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Full text of "Annual reports"

A 

N 
N 
U 
A 
L 



E 



R 
E 

I D 

R 
T 



OF THE 

T 
O 
W 

N 

O 

F 

F 

I 

C 

E 

R 

S 



For the Year Ending 
December 31, 1975 



F 

I 

E 
D 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreports1975medf 



325th Anniversary 




ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 
TOWN OFFICERS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1975 



IN MEMORIAM 



ALLISON T. CARR 

Cemetery Commissioner 1965 - 1975 

Board of Health 1961 - 1967 

Acting Building Inspector 1950 - 1954 

Building Inspector 1955 - 1963 
Enforcing Officer - 

Board of Appeals for Zoning 1956 - 1963 
Sewerage Regulations Agent 

for Board of Health 1957 - 1963 



HARRY E. CONWAY 

Assessor 1925 - 1969 

Finance Committee 1927 - 1933 
Development and Industrial 

Commission 1955 - 1963 



LINDSEY N. RIPLEY 

Police Officer 1937 - 1949 

Keeper of Lockup, Constable 



LAWRENCE G. ROSSI 

Veterans' Director 1948 - 1957 

Park and Planning Board 1947 - 1950 



ERNEST L. SPENCER 
Park and Planning Board 1956 - 1968 

RAYMOND P. WOLLAK 
Dog Officer 1970 - 1971 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 



Population as of March 1, 1975 
Assessed Valuation 1975: 
Tax Rate: 



1/1/75 - 6/30/75 
7/1/75 - 6/30/76 



10,031 

$71,062,335.00 

55.75 
61.50 



Area: 14.43 Square Miles 



Miles of Highway: 



56 



Elevation at Town Hall approximately 180 feet above mean sea level. 



Medfield is in the following Voting Districts 

Representative to Congress - 
10th Congressional District 



Governor's Councillor - 
2nd District 



State Senator - 

Middlesex and Norfolk District 



State Representative - 
59th Middlesex 



Margaret M. Heckler 
30 Colburn Road 
Wellesley Hills. Mass 

George F. Cronin, Jr 
58 Cerdan Avenue 
Boston, Mass. 

David H. Locke 
15 Ordway Road 
Wellesley Hills, Mass 

George R. Sprague 
5 Powderhouse Lane 
Sherborn, Mass. 



United States Senators: 



Edward W. Brooke 

J. F. Kennedy Memorial Building 

Boston, Mass. 



Edward M. Kennedy 

J. F. Kennedy Memorial Building 

Boston, Mass. 



ANNUAL REPORT 
TOWN OFFICERS 



MODERATOR 



Ralph C Copeland 



Term expires 1976 



TOWN CLERK 



Nancy J. Preston 



Term expires 1976 



TREASURER 



Edward F. Barrett, Jr 



Term expires 1978 



SELECTMEN 



Arthur L. Farrar 
Harry A. Kelleher 
R. Edward Beard 



Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 



ASSESSORS 



Joseph S. Kennedy 
Roger E. Hardy 
Melville J. Mills 



Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Dawn I. Austin 


Term expires 


1976 


I. Jerome O'Connor, Jr.* 


Term expires 


1976 


David E. Hansen, resigned 


Term expires 


1977 


Thomas McMurtrie 


Term expires 


1977 


Phillip J. Burr 


Term expires 


1978 


John C. Rudisill 


Term expires 


1978 


*elected to fill unexpired term 






TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 







Kenneth G. Fettig 
Jane M. Guthrie 
James F. Barton 
David Wilmarth 
Mary Ellen Donahue 
Barbara A. Houck 



Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



Charles H. Rayner, Jr, 



Term expires 1977 



PLANNING BOARD 



Burgess P. Standley 
Sandra G. Munsey 
Kenneth M. Childs , Jr, 
Donald J. MacDonald 
C. Richard McGullough 



Term expires 
Term expires 
Term expires 
Term expires 
Term expires 



1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 



PARK COMMISSIONERS 



William J. Heller 
Andrew F. Thompson 
Arthur F. McEvoy 
Barbara F. Maliff 
Eric W. O'Brien 
Genie T. Roberts 
Warren F. Sheard 



Jr, 



Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



Hazel R. Frank, State Appointed 
Richard D. J. Palson, Resigned 
Dorothy Anastasi* 
Bruce J. Oravec 
Michael Tammero 
Richard Knopf, Resigned 
Lawrence M. O'Dell* 

^elected 



Term 


expires 


1976 


Term 


expires 


1976 


Term 


expires 


1976 


Term 


expires 


1978 


Term 


expires 


1979 


Term 


expires 


1980 


Term 


expires 


1976 



to fill unexpired term 



FIRE CHIEF 

Joseph E. Ryan 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

William H. Mann 

SERGEANTS 



E. Nina Iafolla 



George W. Kingsbury 



PATROLMEN 



Anthony A. Bertone 
Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
Parick W. Clancy 
John T. Garvey, Jr. 
Ronald E. Kerr 



Robert E. Naughton 
Robert B. Ripley 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 
Raymond J. Wheeler 



PERMANENT INTERMITTENT PATROLMEN 



Edward J. 
Patrick J, 
Edward J. 
>ph P. 



Buckley, Resigned 

Caulf ield 
Farioli 
Flaherty, Jr. 



PLUMBING INSPECTOR 
George E. Nye 



Russell N. Mulgrew 
David S. Sloan 
Gregory Tanger 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

Michael J. Sullivan Term expires 1976 

SUPER INTENDENT OF STREETS, WATER AND SEWER 

Term expires 1976 



William E. McCarthy 



Thomas A. Caragliano 
Joseph A. Marinella, Resigned 
Richard H . Whelan 
Francis X. Curry 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. 
Allison T. Carr, Deceased 
Peter C. O'Brien 
Joseph A. Roberts 



WATER AND SEWER COMMISSIONERS 



John D. Williams 
Bruce 0. Tobiasson 
Charles F. Cotton, Resigned 
Allen F. Holmes, Resigned 
Leland D. Beverage 



TREE WARDEN 



Ellis N. Allen 



Ellis N. Allen 



Hebert B. Burr 
Rebel L. Palumbo 



SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 



FIELD DRIVERS AND FENCE VIEWERS 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 



Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 



Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 



Term expires 1976 



Term expires 1976 



Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 



Richard A. Ellsworth 



Term expires 1976 



POUND KEEPER 



Roy Owen 



Term expires 1976 



DOG OFFICER 



William J. Jennet te 



Term expires 1976 



ASSISTANT DOG OFFICER 



Ruth S. Luke 



Term expires 1976 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



Michael Tammero 



Term expires 1976 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 



J. Hardy Henderson 



Term expires 1976 



PUBLIC WEIGHER 



Richard A. Ellsworth 



Term expires 1976 



OFFICIAL KEEPER OF THE TOWN CLOCK 



Austin C. Buchanan 



Term expires 1976 



CONSTABLES 



Peter Bartkewicz 
Anthony A. Bertone 
Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
Patrick W. Clancy 
John T. Garvey 
E. Nina Iafolla 
Ronald E. Kerr 



George W. Kingsbury 
William H. Mann 
Robert E. Naught on 
Robert B. Ripley 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 
Raymond J. Wheeler 



KEEPERS OF THE LOCK-UP 



Clayton M. Balcom 
Anthony A. Bertone 
Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
Patrick J. Caulfield, Jr. 
Vincent M. Cellucci 
Patrick W. Clancy 
Edward J. Farioli, Jr. 
Joseph P. Flaherty, Jr. 
John T. Garvey 
E. Nina Iafolla 



Ronald E. 


Kerr 


George W. 


Kingsbury 


William H 


. Mann 


Russell N 


. Mulgrew 


Robert E. 


Naughton 


Robert B. 


Ripley 


Kevin W. 


Robinson 


Robert D. 


Roy 


David S. 


Sloan 


Raymond J 


. Wheeler 



POLICE INTERNS 



Raymund S. Rogers 
Daniel J. Hutchinson 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr 
Robert C. Gallo 



Term expires July 1975 
Term expires July 1975 
Term expires Jan. 1976 
Term expires Jan. 1976 



Jessie A. Erskine 
Elizabeth Hinkley 
Joyce F. Johnson 
Mary I. MairEtienne 
Priscilla Mahoney 



POLICE MATRONS 



TRAFFIC SUPERVISORS 



Elisabeth T. Mann 
Mary T. Nyren 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Marie E. St. Pierre 
Mary L. Solari 



Elizabeth R. Hinkley 
Joyce F. Johnson 
Priscilla Mahoney 
Elisabeth T. Mann 
Mary T. Nyren 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Marie St. Pierre 
Mary L. Solari 



Term 


expires 


June 


1976 


Term 


expires 


June 


1976 


Term 


expires 


June 


1976 


Term 


expires 


June 


1976 


Term 


expires 


June 


1976 


Term 


expires 


June 


1976 


Term 


expires 


June 


1976 


Term 


expires 


June 


1976 



HONORARY SPECIAL POLICE OFFICER 

William H. Bowman 

SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 



Michael Alberta 
James 0. Aronson 
Albert Baima 
Clayton M. Balcolm 
Steven E. Bassett 
Allan K. Belcher 
Herbert Bennett 
Donald J. Bickel 
Leo M. Brennan 
James A. Brown 
Herbert B. Burr 
Herbert L. Burr 
James Campbell 
Richard T. Cantrell 
Edward L. Carreiro 
William Carlson 
Herbert Carr 
Joseph Carvalho 
Michael J. Cellucci 
Vincent M. Cellucci 
Paul Conant 
Joseph Concannon 
Russell A. Devereau 
Michael J. Donahue 
Kenneth W. Dunbar 
David C. Egy 
Robert Eklund 



Jr. 



Jr. 



Howard L. Kilmer 
Robert Kreger 
John Kubacki 
Thomas M. LaPlante, 
Donald H. Lee 
Alfred Leverone 
Edward Mahan 
Warren Maloney 
William J, Marchand 
Robert McGrath 
Thomas W. McNeeley, Jr. 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 
William Meau 
George P. Michel 
Hugh Mick 
James E. Morris 
James H. Morris 

S. Newell, Jr. 

W. O'Connell 
James Padula 
Rebel L„ Palumbo 
Mario Pederzini 
Leo J. Prince 
Harold F. Pritoni 
Walter F. Reynolds 
Walter F. Reynolds 
David Riggs 



Frank 
James 



Jr. 

Sr. 



Special Police Officers Cont. 



Richard A. Ellsworth 
Jeffrey M. Farrell 
Tassos P. Filledes 
Dana P. Friend 
John Geraghty 
Arnold U. Giard 
Elwin Graves 
John T. Grover 
Vincent Hallowell 
Joseph Harkins 
George W. Hinkley 
Paul Hinkley 
Peter S. Hinkley 
Frank S. Hoffman 
John Holmes 
William J. Jennette 
Samuel Johnston 
William D. Jones 
George Katapodis 
James T. Kashalena 



Warren H. Robinson 
Raymund S. Rogers 
Joel Rosenfeld 
Joseph E. Ryan 
George St. Pierre 
Robert J. Sessa 
David M. Sexton 
Carl Sheridan 
George E. Smith, Jr 
Robert D. Taylor 
Robert G. V. Taylor 
J. Robert Tosi 
William Triefol 
Joel Udstuen 
John E. Varnum, Jr. 
Edmund Waitkevich 
Thomas Ward 
Thomas Watson 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



Leslie J. Howlett , Resigned 
Michael J. Sullivan 



Term expires June 30, 1975 
Term expires April 1976 



TOWN COUNSEL 



Charles Fuller, Jr. Resigned 
John F. St. Cyr 



Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 



VETERANS' AGENT 



Paul F. Ci 



Term expires 1976 



VETERANS' DIRECTOR 



Paul F. Curran 



Term expires 1976 



VETERANS' GRAVES OFFICER 



G.Marshall Chick 



Term expires 1976 



BURIEL AGENT 



Paul F. Curran 



Term expires 1976 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 



Beatrice Bangs 
John F. Ganley 
Mary MairEtienne 



Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 



10 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 

Herbert B. Burr Term expires April, 1976 

ASSISTANT INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 



Richard Ostrander, Resigned 
Rebel L. Palumbo 



Term expires April, 1976 
Term expires April, 1976 



PLUMBING INSPECTOR 



George E. Nye 



Term expires 1976 



ASSISTANT PLUMBING INSPECTOR 



Walter R. Nye 



Term expires 1976 



Joseph F. Erskine 



WIRING INSPECTOR 



ASSISTANT WIRING INSPECTOR 



Term expires 1976 



Thomas J. f Toole 



Term expires 1976 



GAS INSPECTOR 



Walter R. Nye 



Term expires 1976 



ASSISTANT GAS INSPECTOR 



George E. Nye 



Term expires 1976 



BOARD OF APPEALS FOR ZONING, SUBDIVISION CONTROL 



James 0. Aronson 

Ralph C. Copeland, Resigned 

Robert F. Sylvia 

James T. Regan 

William F. Spang, Associate Member 



Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1976 



BOARD OF APPEALS FOR ZONING ENFORCING OFFICER 



Thomas V. Sweeney, Jr. 
Herbert B. Burr 



Term expires Aug. 1975 
Term expires 1976 



BUILDING CODE COMMITTEE 



Herbert B. Burr 

Joseph E. Ryan 

Francis J. Mastropieri 

Nicholas Laverghetta 

Joseph T. Cunning 

James W. Brock, Associate Member 



Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1975 



11 



DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 



Walter M. Frank 
Benjamin Astley, Resigned 
Truman W. Netherton 
John 0. Ekstrom 
George M. Graham, Jr. 
Donald H. Harding 
Arnold C. Coda 
William P. Mikelonis 
Clayton H. Haigh, Resigned 



Austin C. Buchanan 



John E. Varnum, Jr. 



DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 



DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 



UNDERWATER RESCUE AND RECOVERY 



Term 


expires 


1976 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1978 


Term 


expires 


1978 


Term 


expires 


1978 


Term 


expires 


1979 


Term 


expires 


1979 


Term 


expires 


1979 



Term expires 1976 



Term expires 1976 



Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. 



Term expires 1976 



SHELTER MANAGER 



Constance E. Waite 



Term expires 1976 



Frederick A. Rogers, Jr. 



DISPATCHER 

CIVIL DEFENSE MESSENGER 

Donald A. Gottberg 

CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE 



Term expires 1976 



John E. Varnum, Jr. , Captain 



James 0. Aronson, Lieutenant 
Vincent M. Cellucci, Lieutenant 
Mario Pederzini, Sergeant 



Thomas J. Barry 
Blair Belcher 
Bruce Berry 
Jeffrey F. Bibby 
Leroy Carter 
Kenneth M. Childs, Jr 
Laurence Costello 
John Costello 
Ghassoub P. Frangie 
William J. Jennette 



OFFICERS 



Warren Robinson, Sergeant 
Robert J. Sessa, Sergeant 



James T. Kashalena 
William J. Marchand 
J. Michael Roman, Jr. 
Edward Spita 
Herbert Talerman 
Edward A. Taraskiewicz 
Robert D. Taylor 
Robert G.V. Taylor 
John E. Varnum, Sr. 
Constance E. Waite 



CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE RESCUE 



Michael J. Cellucci, Sergeant 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr., Sergeant 



David M. Sexton, Sergeant 
Dana P. Friend, Corporal 



12 



Civil Defense Police Rescue Cont 



OFFICERS 



Richard Armstrong 
Ralph W. Chadsey, Jr, 
Aldo D. D'Angelo 
Robert C. Gallo 
Walter Hersee 



Robert Grover 
Janice Newell 



CIVIL DEFENSE RESCUE 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Jane Mine singer 

Mario Pederzini 

Robert A. Kinsman 

Hanson C. Robbins 

Robert W. MacLeod 

Erwin A. Seidel 

William D. Walsh 

Frederick D. Harris, Associate Member 

Alden H. Pember, Associate Member 

Caroline Standley, Associate Member 



Daniel J. Hutchinson 
Timothy M. Kleczek 
Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr. 
Frederick A. Rogers, Jr, 
Wayne R. Stokes 



Jean St. Pierre 
Martha Ann Tripp 



Term 


expires 


1976 


Term 


expires 


1976 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1978 


Term 


expires 


1978 


Term 


expires 


1978 


Term 


expires 


1976 


Term 


expires 


1976 


Term 


expires 


1976 



SEWER ASSESSMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 



Graham Blandy 
Kenneth S. Brock 
Charles F. Cotton 



Robert L. Melican 
Charles H. Peck 



POLICE STATION STUDY COMMITTEE 



Charles W. Griffin 
Marvin W. Kushner 
William H. Mann 



Thomas A. McGinnis 

Thomas V. Sweeney, Sr. 

Michael J. Sullivan, Ex officio 



INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Edward J. MacDonald 

Alfred B. Chaplin, Resigned 

Robert S. Capers, Jr. 



MEDFIELD DESIGNEE ADVISORY BOARD, MBTA 



Michael J. Sullivan 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 



Term expires 1976 



Harry A. Kelleher Term expires August 3, 1977 

COMMITTEE TO STUDY NEEDS FOR EXPANSION OF MEMORIAL LIBRARY FACILITIES 



Kenneth F. Hunt 
Thompson S. Lingel 
Sandra G. Munsey 
Alexander J. Smith, Jr. 



Ward C. Smith, Resigned 
Paul H. Snyder 
Robert F. Sylvia 
David L. Wilmarth 
John F. Wissler 



13 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



Gerald Bangs 
Virginia Couper 
Barbara Fetteroll 
Charles A. Doyle 
Madeleine I. Harding 
Elizabeth L. Martin 
Dorothy Anastasi 
Edwin C. Flaherty 
Alison M. Ulrich 



Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1975 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1975 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1975 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1976 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1976 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1976 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1977 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1977 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1977 



SPECIAL BICENTENNIAL AND 325TH ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE 



Pauline Coulter 
Robert Coulter 
Barbara Cronin 
Edward Doherty 
Robert E. Dooley 
Ralph C. Good, Jr. 
Pauline M. Goucher 
Beverly L. Hallowell 
William L. Hallowell 



Dorothy Kane 
Shirley Maples 
James Moynihan, Resigned 
Edward A. Otting 
Patricia Rioux 
Claire Shaw 
Michael Tammero 
Marie M. Burke, Assoc. Member 
Joseph L. Marcionette, 
Honorary, Chairman 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



Donald J. MacDonald 

Roy A. McQuillan 

Laura H. Smith 

Robert H. Luke, Jr., Resigned 

Eleanor Anes 

Ann S. Mentzer 

David L. Wilmarth 

William E. McCarthy, Associate Member 

William F. McCarthy, Associate Member 



Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1976 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1976 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1976 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1977 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1978 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1978 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1978 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1976 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1976 



AMBULANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Austin C. Buchanan 
William H. Mann 



Resigned 



James D. Sullivan, M.D 



Robert E. Meaney 
Joseph E. Ryan 



Jr, 



DATA PROCESSING ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



James B. Brennan 

Harold Plough 

Frank R. Roberts 

Morris Simson 

Robert Stokes 

Tobey, J. E. Reed, Assoiate Member 

Michael J. Sullivan, Ex officio 



Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING TEAM 



Arthur L. Farrar 



Neal R. Olsen 



Charles Peck 



14 



MEETING HOUSE POND COMMITTEE 



Margaret Bancroft 
Arnold C. Coda 
Pauline Coulter 
William Heller 



William E. McCarthy 
Roy A. McQuillan 
Elmer 0. Portmann 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY PLANNING BOARD 



MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 



Sarsfield Brennan 
Jane Minesinger 
Alexander J. Smith, 
Margaret Bancroft 
Hanson C. Robbins 
Carol Shaw 
Sandra Fitch 
Francis Rossi 
Robert N. Zabe 



Jr, 



Term expires June 28, 1976 

Term expires June 28, 1976 

Term expires June 28, 1976 

Term expires June 28, 1977 

Term expires June 28, 1977 

Term expires June 28, 1977 

Term expires June 28, 1978 

Term expires June 28, 1978 

Term expires June 28, 1978 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY BOARD OF HEALTH 



William R. Domey 



INSPECTORS OF SANITATION 

John J. Keefe Ferial R. Morrissette 

BOARD OF HEALTH ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Marie M. Burke 
Madeleine I. Harding 
Nancy C. Kashalena 
John J. Keefe 



Ferial R. Morrisette 
Nancy J. Preston 
A. Ritchie Stagg, M.D. 
Arlene H. Whitney, R.N.-VNA 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 



JUNIOR HIGH ADULT ADVISORY BOARD 



Irene Barr 
Harold Barr 
Patricia Bryda 
Anthony A. Coffone 
Nancy M. Coffone 
Mary Louise Cribbin 



Mary E. Harrison 

Mary E. Fahrenkrog 

Kathryn Zabe 

Joseph J. Zuccarini, Sr, 

Mary T. Zuccarini 



15 



RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Philip J. Burr 
Arthur L. Farrar 
Robert Kinsman 
Elizabeth L. Martin 



C. Richard McCullough 
Carol P. Shaw 
Paul Valzania 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY MODERATOR 



WARRANT COMMITTEE 



Ellen E. Gifford 

Charles H. Peck 

Elmer 0. Portmann 

James A. Sproul, Resigned 

Charles W. Griffin 

Richard J. Lyman 

Paul F. Valzania 

William M. Heyer 

Jane P. McCarty 

Paul H. Snyder 



Term expires April 1, 1976 

Term expires April 1, 1976 

Term expires April 1, 1976 

Term expires April 1, 1976 

Term expires April 1, 1977 

Term expires April 1, 1977 

Term expires April 1, 1977 

Term expires April 1, 1978 

Term expires April 1, 1978 

Term expires April 1, 1978 



SCHOOL PLANNING AND BUILDING COMMITTEE 



Philip J. Burr 
Ralph A. Parmagiane 
Robert S. Capers, Jr. 
David R. Iverson 
Maryellen M. Valzania 



Neal R. Olsen 
Robert P. Ceresi 
Loren G. Eaton 



R. Edward Beard 
Pauline M. Goucher 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



Term expires April 1, 1976 

Term expires April 1, 1976 

Term expires April 1, 1977 

Term expires April 1, 1978 

Term expires April 1, 1978 



Term expires November 30, 1976 
Term expires November 30, 1977 
Term expires November 30, 1978 



MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 



Lindsey Ripley 
Thomas Seeley 



James Tubridy 
DEPUTY MODERATOR 
Tidal B. Henry Term expires April 1976 

REGIONAL REFUSE DISPOSAL COMMITTEE 
Robert P. Ceresi Frank J. Cusack Steven M. Rudnick 



16 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TAX COLLECTOR 



DEPUTY COLLECTORS 
Peter Bartkewicz Virginia F. Kinter Clarissa C. Supko 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY FIRE CHIEF 



Walter Reynolds, Jr., Deputy Fire Chief 

Frederick A. Rogers, Captain 

Clinton M. Clark, Lieutenant 

Ellis N. Allen, Lieutenant 

William B. Reynolds, Lieutenant 

Mario Pederzini, Clerk 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TOWN CLERK 

Marie M. Burke, Ass't. Town Clerk 

ASSISTANT CLERKS 

Kathleen N. Conners Pauline M. Goucher Charlotte R. Randolph 



APPOINTED BY CHAIRMAN OF SELECTMEN, 

CHAIRMAN OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 

and MODERATOR to 

REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

James A. Sproul Term expires July 1977 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TREASURER 

Charlotte R. Randolph, Assistant Treasurer Term expires March 1978 






17 



DEPARTMENTAL 
REPORTS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1975 



19 




20 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



The year 1975 marked the start of difficult times for the Town of Med- 
field and for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. As the year progressed, 
the true financial picture of the Commonwealth began to emerge and it was not 
at all bright. At the end of the year, there was still much debate and un- 
certainty as to what the actual financial condition of the Commonwealth was 
but there was no doubt that it was bleak. In addition to the major operating 
deficiencies facing the State, the high unemployment rates, the impact on the 
bond market resulting from the near default of New York City and the prelimi- 
nary report on the pension systems make the situation even more critical. 

At the local level, after several years of a stable tax rate, Medfield 
experienced a substantial increase of $5.75 in the property tax rate. At the 
close of 1975, there was every indication that the town would be facing an- 
other substantial property tax increase in 1976. The amount of this increase 
will depend greatly upon the level of State Aid which in recent years has not 
been keeping up with the cost of local government. Now given the financial 
plight of the State, we have less reason to hope for property tax relief. 

To make matters more difficult, the State and Federal governments have 
been mandating more and more programs at the local level and turning back 
over to the cities and towns programs for which they had earlier assumed res- 
ponsibility. To give some perspective on the problem, the following illustra- 
tions break down Medfield 1 s revenues and expenditures by major categories. 




.:■:* '. . ..'■ '..V. . 

: 

■■■■ ■■ .;■■■■«.■:■ >- :-. : 




V 



W 



'"■-''-MSM- 




SELECTMEN EDWARD BEARD AND EXECUTIVE SECRETARY MICHAEL SULLIVAN RECEIVING AN 
AWARD OF A CERTIFICATE OF MERIT FROM HAYDEN WILBUR OF THE MASSACHUSETTS 

SELECTMEN'S ASSOCIATION 



21 





EXPENDITURES 








1. 


Education 


$5 


,026,375 


00 


70 


2% 


2. 


Town Operations 


1 


,712,395 


24 


23 


9% 


3. 


County Assessments 




187,004 


39 


2 


6% 


4. 


State Assessments 




157,196 


00 


2 


2% 


5. 


Other 




24,956 


94 





3% 


6. 


Overlay including 




54,176 


53 





8% 



prior year deficits 
(reserve for abate- 
ments) 



Total 



$7,162,104.10 



100% 




3. 2.6% 

4. 2.2% 

5. 0.3% 

6. 0.8% 



22 





REVENUE 










1. 


Property Tax 


$4 


370,340 


23 


61 


02% 


2. 


Local Receipts 
(water, motor 
excise, licenses, 
fees, etc.) 




554,558 


23 


7 


74% 


3. 


Available Funds 
(stabilization , 
transfers, etc.) 




182,332 


34 


2 


55% 


4. 


Free Cash 




355,000 


00 


4 


96% 


5. 


State Receipts 
including cherry 
sheet overestimates 


1 


699,873 


30 


23. 


73% 



Total $7,162,104.10 



100% 




23 



It should be noted in particular that on the revenue side, more than 
three/fifths of the total revenues derive from the property tax. In the im- 
mediate future, it can be expected that the proportion of revenues derived 
from the property tax will increase. On the expenditure side, more than 

./tenths of total local expenditures are for education. This amount, it 
should be pointed out, includes costs which are carried in various town bud- 
-, but which are directly related to education. 

The proportion of local expenditures which are set aside for education 
should give one pause to reflect on the enormous effect which this one muni- 
cipal service has on the tax bill and of the necessity for reviewing expendi- 
tures in this area with the same scrutiny as is given to all town budgets. 
However, it may well be that this will only come about when educational bud- 
gets are subject to the same town meeting review as are other municipal bud- 
gets. 

In addition, there is another area of local expenditures which has been 
growing and which receives little scrutiny at the local level. This area is 
the State and County assessments. Although at the present time that repre- 
sents a small proportion of total expenditures, their growth has been great 
and in particular the cost of operating the MBTA has increased out of propor- 
tion to the services received. In this case as well as with other instances 
of government agencies which are not directly responsive to the taxpayer, 
there has been a disregard for the opinions or financial condition of the per- 
son paying the bill. Such neglect can no longer be tolerated, given the eco- 
nomic conditions of the times. 

A further area of local concern in recent years has been the prolifera- 
tion of employee unions at the local level. At the present time in Medfield 
the following associations represent various municipal employees: 



Jurisdiction 



Union 



Board of Selectmen 
School Committee 



Medfield Police League 

School Administrators Association 

Medfield Teachers Association 



The American Federation of State, County 
and Municipal Employees, AFL-CIO, State 
Council #41, Local #1298 (Custodians) 

Cafeteria Workers of the Town of Medfield 

Medfield Central Office Secretaries 
Association 

Medfield Educational Secretaries 
Association 

While to date these organizations are confined to employees of the police and 
school departments, they have nevertheless transformed the entire approach to 
personnel management at the local level. 

One might well ask what all of this portends for the home owner and pro- 
perty taxpayer in Medfield. The answer to this is not simple and will only 
evolve over a period of time. However, one thing is clear. If we are to 



24 



bring the property tax back into line it will be necessary for the towns- 
people to familiarize themselves with local issues and local programs and to 
make known their opinions to the local, state and federal officials. Without 
the input and support of the taxpayer, the elected officials will undoubtedly 
succumb to the demands of interest groups, seeking new programs and new ex- 
penditures. 

On the more positive side, 1975 saw developments for the town in many 
areas. 

CONSERVATION 

Funding was approved for the acquisition of 257 acres on Noon Hill. At 
the end of 1975, the town had acquired the major portion of this land. In 
addition, the 1975 special town meeting in November authorized the acquisition 
of 2 additional parcels of land between South Street and Stop River, which 
will protect the scenic view of Noon Hill. The efforts of the Conservation 
Commission in securing this land for future generations are certainly to be 
commended. 

SEWER TREATMENT 

On March 3, 1975, the Medfield Wastewater Treatment plant began operating. 
During the course of the year, the flow was augmented with the completion of 
the various segments of interceptors and street sewers. The town was host to 
numerous groups from throughout the State and New England who wanted to tour 
the new facilities. The town is most fortunate in having highly qualified and 
dedicated plant personnel who have made this treatment plant a model through- 
out the region. We are now negotiating with the State Hospital to tie in to 
our treatment facilities. The Town of Millis is now in a study phase which 
may eventually lead to a tie-in with Medfield. During the year, preliminary 
work was also done on extensions of the sewer system to the Longmeadow and 
Belknap areas with construction expected to commence during 1976. 

TOWN HALL 

Physical improvements to the Town Hall were acted upon favorably by the 
town meeting with the appropriation of $12,000. for landscaping and other im- 
provements to the area in front of the Town Hall and with an appropriation of 
$6,000. for the paving of the parking lot at the rear of the Town Hall. In 
addition, the lobby and stairway to the second floor was renovated to provide 
space for the Chenery Bicentennial Store which opened in November. Finally, 
as a result of a boiler failure, new heating facilities were installed in the 
Fall. 

RECREATION 

As a result of application to the Federal Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, a grant of $25,000. was made to the town for improvements to 
Metacomet Park in line with the recreation facilities improvement program 
which was prepared by the Park and Recreation Commission and submitted to the 
Town in January of 1975. A Community Gardens Committee was appointed by the 
Board of Selectmen to investigate the potential for development of a community 
garden program; reported to the Town Meeting and was given an appropriation _of 
$500. to implement a community gardens program for the Spring of 1976. The 
site chosen for the community gardens was the location of the former sewer 
beds off Dale Street. Also the town land adjacent to the Medfield State Hospi- 
tal was used for the Lumberjack Show and the Lions Club Carnival. 

25 




o 

c_> _i 



2: o 

O M 

C_> I— 

IS) 



26 



COMPREHENSIVE EMPLOYMENT TRAINING ACT 

In January of 1975, the town was notified that it had been authorized 
ten CETA positions and that hiring could commence immediately. These posi- 
tions were utilized thoughout the various town departments and overall the 
town benefited greatly from the efforts of these employees . The program was 
particularly useful in that it allowed the town to experiment with a variety 
of programs. One such area in particular was that of grounds maintenance. 
As a result of a series of meetings of the Selectmen's Grounds Maintenance 
Committee, CETA employees were given responsibility for maintenance of various 
town properties and equipment. A flail mower attachment was purchased for use 
by all town departments. 

HOUSING 

Our Housing Authority, who was designated by the Selectmen as Housing 
Selection Committee, selected tenants for the Wilkins Glen complex which was 
completed during the summer of 1975. In addition, as a result of the diligent 
efforts of the Housing Authority, ground was broken for the new 60-unit Hous- 
ing for the Elderly Project on Pound Street. 

COMPUTER OPERATIONS 

During 1975, the computer leased by the town was put into operation and 
by year's end, all payroll, billing, accounting and water billing operations 
were being processed on the machine. The Data Processing Committee which was 
instrumental in the selection of this computer installation was of great assis- 
tance in. implementing the various applications. 

WATER 

A new 12" water main was installed on Rocky Lane which will increase the 
water supply to the Indian Hill area. A test well was constructed for well 
No. 4 off Elm Street and this well should be completed in 1976, substantially 
augmenting our water supply. In addition, the Water and Sewerage Board de- 
cided to submit an article to the 1976 Annual Town Meeting to update the Mas- 
ter Plan for water to determine the future need for capital improvements in 
our water facilities. 

HIGHWAY 

As a result of the diligent efforts of our Highway Superintendent, im- 
provements to railroad crossings at South and Elm, Dale and Cottage Streets 
were completed and improvements at the Main Street and West Street crossings 
were tentatively scheduled for the summer of 1976. Route 27 was formally 
turned over to the town by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the town meet- 
ing appropriated funds for the installation of traffic signals at the inter- 
section of Route 27 and Dale Street. As part of its maintenance program, the 
Highway Department resurfaced a section of Route 27 in the High Street area. 

In following a long time tradition, carried out every five years, the 
perambulation of the town borders was carried out and the officials of our 
neighboring towns were most cooperative in marking off the town bounds. As 
the oldest town, Medfield is charged with initiating this perambulation. It 
is a truly memorable occasion for town officials and a rare opportunity to 
get together with our neighboring town officials on an informal basis. All 
bounds were found to be in their proper place. 



27 




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28 



BICENNTENNIAL 

Medfield's participation in the Bicentennial Celebration commenced on 
April 19th with a commemorative program at the Town Hall and Peak House which 
included a reactivation of the Medfield Company of Militia and Minutemen un- 
der the command of William McVicar. The Bicentennial Committee also spon- 
sored a wide variety of events, including a lumberjack show, flea market, 
a period wedding and house tour. The various historical items gathered by 
the committee were made available for sale at the Chenery Commemorative Bi- 
centennial Store. In addition, the Historical Society prepared a reprint of 
Tilden's History which was published in December. As 1975 closed, the Bi- 
centennial Committee was already well underway with its plans for the commem- 
oration of the 325th anniversary and from the work that they have done to 
date, the town can look forward to an outstanding series of events. 

REORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD 

In February, Selectman Joseph L. Marcionette announced he would not be 
a candidate for re-election. With more than twenty years of service as a 
Selectman and over forty years service to the town in various other capacities, 
Mr. Marcionette relinquished his seat on the board with an offer to assist the 
town in any way possible — an offer which the board accepted quickly when they 
appointed Mr. Marcionette as honorary chairman of the Medfield 325th Anniver- 
sary and Special Bicentennial Committee. Joe was honored by more than 300 
members of family and friends at a testimonial, and subsequently was made per- 
manent chaplain of the Norfolk County Selectmen's Association and given tri- 
butes from numerous State and local officials. 

Joe was succeeded to the board by R. Edward Beard at the election in 
March. At the Board's organizational meeting in March, Harry A. Kelleher was 
elected chairman and R. Edward Beard was elected clerk with Arthur L. Farrar 
serving as third member. 

During the course of the year, the Selectmen in joint meetings with the 
Housing Authority and the School Committee, filled vacancies to each of these 
boards respectively as follows: 

Housing Authority Dorothy Anastasi and Lawrence O'Dell 

to the vacancies created by the resig- 
nations of Richard Knopf and Richard C.J. 
Palson 

School Committee I. Jerome O'Connor, Jr. to the vacancy 

created by the resignation of David E. 
Hansen 

On February 10th, Michael J. Sullivan took office as the new Executive 
Secretary, replacing Frederick C. Conley who resigned the prior year. The 
Town Accountant, Leslie J. Howlett, retired in June after 33 years of service 
to the town. Town officials and friends honored him for his longevity and 
dedication to the town. His position was filled by Michael J. Sullivan. 
After nine years on the job, Town Counsel Charles Fuller, Jr. announced his 
resignation from that position, effective in November. The resignation was 
accepted with deep regret. He represented the town extremely well while 
serving as Town Counsel. Attorney John St. Cyr of Millis was then appointed 
Town Counsel. 



29 




-Q 



o- 



30 



NEW LEGISLATION 

Two bills directly affecting the town of Medfield were passed by the 
State Legislature during 1975 with Representative George R. Sprague providing 
the leadership in securing their passage. The first of these authorized Med- 
field to employ a combined front foot residential unit basis for apportioning 
sewer betterment costs and the second enabled cities and towns to indemnify 
municipal officials up to limits of one million dollars. 

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS 

In an effort to augment town revenues and to make as many town services 
as possible self-financing, inspection fees were revised during the course 
of the year and license fees were upgraded. An out-of-court settlement in 
the school suit between the town and ten registered voters over the school 
appropriation was reached with the town agreeing to reinstate 50% of the 
amount deleted from the budget. 

CONCLUSION 



While 1975 was disturbing in a financial sense, it may well be that the 
emergence of the State's many financial problems will lead to their solution. 
In 1976 it is hoped that elected officials and citizens at all levels will 
face these problems with the same spirit and tenacity as the residents of 
Medfield and the Commonwealth faced with oppressive taxation policies of 
England in 1776. It is ironic that we are facing the same problems 200 years 
later as we are celebrating our Bicentennial. 

The great response to the talent bank program instituted this year in 
Medfield gives hope that the residents of Medfield are willing to accept 
such responsibility and to tackle their problems in the spirit of community 
which has always made Medfield a desirable place to live. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HaAAy A. KoJUith^A, Chairman 
R. EdiAJOAd B&aAd, Clerk 
AnXkuJi L. fcwiasi 
Board of Selectmen 



31 




Photo by Edward Carreiro 



APRIL 19th RE-ENACTMENT 
32 



PROCLAMATION 



REACTIVATION OF THE MEDFIELD COMPANIES OF MILITIA AND MINUTEMEN 



WHEREAS , 



the rolls at the State House show that the patriots of 
Medfield were roused to arms by the alarm of April 19, 
1775, Captain Sabin Mann in command of the company of 
twenty-seven minutemen and Captain Ephrain Chenery in 
command of a company of militia numbering fifty-four 
officers and men. Both companies marched at once to Rox- 
bury, ready for whatever service that crucial time of 
peril might demand. And from that time onward, through 
all the years of a long and terrible struggle for na- 
tional independence, the members of the Militia of Med- 
field bravely fulfilled their duty at home, in the camp, 
and on the field of battle. The patriotic spirit which 
declared itself in the doings of the town meetings, such 
as the support of the Suffolk Resolves, long before the 
battles of Lexington and Concord, gave itself expression 
when the time came in heroic service of the march, and on 
the field of conflict: 



AND WHEREAS, 



the Bicentennial of the American Revolution and the birth 
of this nation is being observed during this and the on- 
coming years ; 



AND WHEREAS 






THEREFORE , 



interested citizens are reorganizing the Militia Companies 
in order to render proper observances of the historic 
events shortly forthcoming, and to honor those citizen 
soldiers and their families of our towns during the Ameri- 
can Revolution. The Medfield Companies of Militia and 
Minutemen will participate in historical re-enactments 
of events pertaining to the Revolution; present programs 
to interested groups and organizations on the history of 
that period, with special interest given to the part 
played by the Medfield Militia; and cooperate with appro- 
priate committees and commissions of the town in present- 
ing appropriate programs. 

be it resolved, that we, the Selectmen of Medfield, do 
hereby proclaim the reactivation of THE MEDFIELD COMPANIES 
OF MILITIA AND MINUTEMEN, and urge our citizens to support 
it in spirit and deed. 



Signed and sealed on the Fifteenth day of April in the year Nineteen Hundred 
and Seventy-five. 

HaAAij, A. Ke££efieA, Chairman 
R. EdwaAd BzctAd, Clerk 
AtuthuA L. VoJVWJi 
Board of Selectmen 



33 



THE SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS, 
WATER AND SEWER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: 

The Annual Report of the several departments assigned to me is hereby 
respectfully submitted. 

LANDFILL : The Operational Plan for the present Landfill site was ap- 
proved by the Regional Engineer of the State Board of Health on January 23, 
1975. At the present time, work at the Landfill is being directed toward 
compliance with the plan and a minimum of inconvenience to the users of the 

Landfill. 

For the first five years of operation as a Landfill operation fortunately 
the Town has not been required to purchase gravel for the daily cover. Cover 
has been supplied from excess materials from other construction projects. 
Included in the budget for fiscal 1977 is an amount for that purpose. 

The Metcalf and Eddy report of September 1974 projects that the present 
approval site will have been exhausted by mid-1977. The Operational Plan 
requires, in accordance with State Regulations, that the final cover consist 
of two feet of suitable material; the final cover add substantially to a 
normal budget. 

In 1970 the Town purchased a 955K Tractor-Dozer for use at the Landfill. 
It was scheduled for trade in 1975 but other equipment priorities precluded 
trade last year. Again funds will be requested this year. Last year's repair 
costs plus proposed costs for repairing the machine for another year equals 
the original purchase price, which indicates that it is time to trade the 
equipment. 

A 1966 White Dump Truck will be assigned to the Landfill operation as 
soon as a new truck that was ordered last year is delivered to the Street 
Department and this addition will improve the efficiency and operation of the 
site. 

Operation of a Landfill site in accordance with an operational plan and 
good practice, in large measure, depends on the operator. It is hoped that 
the provision for annual step raises will induce good personnel who have be- 
come experienced to remain in the Town employ. 

The equipment needed for a Landfill is very expensive and must be main- 
tained properly by a qualified operator. The operator of a Landfill operation 
must be familiar with the Operational Plan and know how to implement it. The 
operator becomes more qualified by attending seminars on Landfill, reading 
articles appearing in various publications and attending classes provided by 
equipment suppliers. 

Appreciation is expressed to the Garden Club for the plantings at the 
entrance to the Landfill area. 



34 






WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT: The new Wastewater Treatment Plant off 
Bridge Street started operation on March 3, 1975. The Plant is classified as 
a Class 5 Plant, which requires an Operator with a Class 5 license. The Town 
was able to meet this requirement in that it had an Operator in training for 
the previous nine months. A new regulation of the Water Pollution Control 
Division requires in the absence of the Operator-in-Charge that his substi- 
tute be qualified by a license equivalent to the Plant's rating. Because of 
the interest of the personnel at the Plant, the second Operator had also ob- 
tained his Class 5 license and the Town experienced no problem meeting the new 
requirement. Through the C.E.T.A. program the Town was able to obtain a 
graduate biologist who was of great assistance in setting up and operating 
the lab. 

Through the ability of operating personnel, within a month, the E.P.A. 
standards for effluent were met and shortly thereafter efficiency of treatment 
was obtained. State officials and other agencies have commended the Town for 
the efficient operation of its Sewer Treatment Plant and it is used as a part 
of the training for new operators. 

The manpower needs to properly operate the plant have been determined. 
It will be necessary to continue the employment of the three full time employ- 
ees if the Plant is to be maintained. If a plant is not maintained, equipment 
deteriorates and the cost of replacement is expensive. 

C.E.T.A. personnel assigned to grounds maintenance mowed the grass during 
the summer. 

It is planned to conduct an open house tour of the Plant for the residents 
of the Town when the weather becomes favorable. 

The assistance of Eliot Tucker and Michael Madigan of Weston and Sampson 
for the start up of the Plant is appreciated. 

The Operators at the Plant have performed excellently during the start 
up and the continued operation of the Plant. As long as they are in the em- 
ploy of the Town, there will be a minimum of concern for the efficient opera- 
tion of this new facility. 

WATER : Since the Town developed its own water supply system in 1955, 
there has been daily maintenance of the equipment at the three pumping sta- 
tions. Under the aegis of the Water and Sewer Board, a more formal preventa- 
tive maintenance program has been developed that will give longer life to the 
equipment and assure residents of a more reliable water supply. 

There is an ongoing program of checking hydrants and repairing them so 
that they will operate when needed for fighting fires. The Town now owns an 
electric valve turner which permits street valves to be worked periodically 
so that when it is necessary to turn water off in the mains due to an emer- 
gency, there will be no delay. 

The personnel of the Water Department consists of a Foreman and three 
Water Technicians. In addition to maintaining the water system, this Depart- 
ment monitors street sewers and interceptors. The Foreman now has the added 
responsibility of inspecting the installation of new sewer services. 

During the next fiscal year this Department will be maintaining Well #4. 
In addition to performing its own functions, personnel assist the Street 
Department in snow removal. 

35 



Personnel from the Water and Street Department built the Community Gar- 
dens on the site of the old sewer beds off Dale Street. 

Interdepartmental cooperation has been excellent and results in better 
public service to the townspeople. 

HIGHWAYS; One of the reasons advocated for the construction of a new 
Town Garage by the Selectmen and the Garage Committee was that it would be 
possible to repair all Town owned equipment. In addition to repairing and 
maintaining its own fourteen pieces of equipment, the Street Department is 
now repairing and maintaining twenty-four pieces of equipment belonging to 
other Town departments. Preventative maintenance schedules have been estab- 
lished and implemented. 

In addition to major pieces of equipment, smaller tools such as power 
saws and lawn mowers are repaired and returned to service. 

As a result of many meetings with various Town committees a flail mower 
attachment was purchased for the Ford tractor. A C.E.T.A. employee was as- 
signed to operate it. In addition to mowing parks and playing fields, the 
roadsides were mowed frequently to the extent that the appearance of the Town 
was improved. The Town Garage area and the Treatment Plant grounds were mowed 
with C.E.T.A. help. The three C.E.T.A. employees assigned to mowing the parks 
also mowed the various islands at intersections. 

In turn, the Street Department assisted C.E.T.A. personnel in clearing 
and improving fire lanes on the newly acquired Noon Hill conservation land 
during the late winter months of 1975. 

Since the C.E.T.A. employees assigned to Park and Recreation Commission 
and the Conservation Commission assisted the Street Department by mowing road- 
sides, the Street Department was able to assist in cleaning Meeting House Pond 
and assisted in other related work. 

In preparation for the Bicentennial and 325th Anniversary Celebration, 
the Street Department painted and repaired guard fences throughout the Town 
and made other improvements. The parade route was reviewed and improved in 
anticipation of that event. Four-way street signs have replaced the two-way 
signs along the parade route which may assist the conduct of the parade. Cur- 
rently, signs for use at the time of the parade are being made. It is expect- 
ed that the Street Department will be called upon to assist various committees 
during the Celebration activities. 

Two years ago, a law was passed requiring municipalities to maintain and 
repair railroad grade crossings. The same law (Chapter 601, Acts of 1974) 
provides that upon application and approval, State and Federal funds will be 
reimbursed if available. State and Federal funds for this purpose are very 
limited and are assigned to major route roads. The Town has been assured that 
it has a very high priority for the Main Street grade crossing. 

The South Street grade crossing was in extremely bad condition and since 
the ties holding the rails were rotted, the Town could do nothing about im- 
proving the crossing. The Penn Central Railroad was requested to install new 
ties with the understanding that the Town would assist them in the work. In 
this way, not only was the South Street crossing improved, but also the Cottage 
and Dale Street crossings were reconstructed. Due to the foresight of the 
Foreman of the Street Department, appropriate size drain pipes were installed 
while the tracks were up. The installation of the pipes will eliminate very 

36 



costly jacking when drainage is installed in these three streets at some fu- 
ture time. 



At the Special Town Meeting of November 1975, funds were appropriated for 
replanking the Causeway Street bridge. The bridge will be rebuilt as it is 
and has been for many years. The bridge should last for many years. 



For many years the Town received funds in 
Chapter 90 programs, but these programs after s 
discontinued in 1973. Several acts of the legi 
funds for construction but the last of the fund 
1977. Plans are being formed at the State leve 
for State Aid. State Aid funds were voted last 
a part of North Street. The remaining funds wi 
for North Street. The Massachusetts Department 
there will be sufficient funds to rebuild North 
Frairy Street. A safe tie-back to the old surf 



accordance with Chapter 81 and 
ixty years of existence were 
slature provided State Aid 
s will be received for fiscal 

I to establish a new program 
year for the construction of 

II be requested again this year 
of Public Works estimates that 
Street from Main Street to 

ace can be made at that point. 



There has been excellent coordination and cooperation between the several 
departments. During the winter months the Police Department is of great help 
in correcting dangerous street conditions by their alertness in notifying the 
Street Department. 

It is a pleasure to work with and for dedicated Town employees and Town 
officials, providing essential services to the residents of the Town. 

The assistance of the Town Hall secretaries and Mr. Sullivan, the Execu- 
tive Secretary, is acknowledged and appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WWLlcun E. McCarthy, 

Superintendent 

STREETS, WATER AND SEWER 







Photo by Edward Carreiro 
MINUTE MAIDENS HONORING LOWELL MASON 



37 



THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my sixth annual report for the year ending December 31, 
1975. 

This year our records show a 13 per cent increase in services rendered, 
due to the increase in population and new building going on in the town. 

Under the Comprehensive Employment Training Act we were able to put two 
men on duty in the station between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. which 
in turn gave a quicker response to any emergency. By having these people in 
the station, the apparatus and station are getting regular maintenance, thus 
allowing me to be out inspecting the schools, businesses, and inspecting the 
home fire alarm systems which are now required by law for new buildings and 
additions to buildings. 

This year Firefighters Austin C. Buchanan and Tracy Mitchell resigned 
and were replaced by David Sloan, Dana Friend, and William Jennette. This 
being a call department, it wilL be my policy to fill any vacancy that exists 
with a person who works within the town. 

In February, Firefighters Thomas LaPlante and Henry Marcel attended a 
tire Service Training Course in Walpole held by the Massachusetts Fire 
Academy. 

In October, Firefighters Robert Bond, James Callachan, Charles Evans, and 
Robert Kennedy attended a "First Responders First Aid Course" as required by 
the State's "First Responders Law." Firefighter Carreiro attended an Instruc- 
tors Course in Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation. Firefighters Phillip Pember 
and James Tubridy attended an "Emergency Medical Technicians" Refresher Course 
in Wrentham. 

During the year, quarterly inspections were made of all public buildings, 
schools, and the nursing home. 

In November, the Wilkens Glen Apartments were tied into the town's fire 
alarm system. 

In December, Firefighter Carreiro attended a course in Standard First Aid 
and Personal Safety and was appointed the department's instructor. 

Again this year, I will be asking for funds to replace the 1941 Ford 
Pumper and I will be asking the town to fund the two positions that were funded 
under the C.E.T.A. Program. 

I would like to extend my sincere thanks to the officers and men of the 
department, members of the Police Department, Secretaries in the Town Office, 
building and gas inspectors for their close cooperation this year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

lo&Q-ph E. Ryan 
Fire Chief 

38 






THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Services rendered for the year ending December 31, 1975 

Buildings 5 

Brush and Grass 79 

State Hospital 15 

Automobiles and Trucks 29 

Rubbish 20 

Gasoline Washdowns 9 

Highway Accidents 8 

Electrical 17 

Investigations 33 

Oil Storage Permits 63 

Inspections 76 

Propane Gas Permits 2 

Model Rocket Permits 28 

Oil or Gas Burners 4 

Mutual Aid 14 

Outside Assistance 8 

Lock Outs 2 

Water Problems 8 

Searches 4 

Home Fire Warning Systems 42 

Bomb Scares 11 

Pumping Cellars 4 

Box Alarms 141 

Still Alarms 211 

False Alarms 30 

Explosive Permits 2 

Station Duty 13 

Dump 5 

Blasting Permits 12 

Outdoor Cooking Permits 16 

Televisions 3 

Rescues 3 

Ovens 5 

Chimneys 4 

Outdoor Burning Permits 129 

Details 7 

Duplicating Fluid Permits 5 

Black Powder Permits 3 

Accidental Alarms 5 



39 



THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit the annual report of the Medfield Police Department for 
the year ending December 31, 1975. 

Personnel 

For the first time since 1967 we have a full complement of men. Robert E. 
Naughton of Norwood, who has been working full time provisionally since 1970, 
was appointed permanent on March 23rd. Anthony A. Bertone of Franklin, who 
has been working as a special auxilliary, and provisional from time to time 
since 1967, was appointed permanent on June 1st. Patrick W. Clancy, who began 
work in 1970 and had resigned in 1973 was reinstated on July 1st. Officer 
Robert Brady has been out sick since November 14th. Hopefully, he will be 
able to return soon. 

The intern program from Northeastern University entered its second year 
on July 1st. During the year we have had three pairs of interns; William 
Donlon of Canton, and Robert Meaney, Jr., of Medfield from January to April; 
Raymund Rogers of Bridgewater, and Daniel Hutchinson of Waltham from April to 
July; Robert Meaney, Jr. of Medfield and Robert Gallo of Westwood from July to 
January. The interns have made a very valuable contribution to the Town of 
Medfield. 

It may be wise to increase the number of interns to help with the ambu- 
lance as well as records and other functions within the department. During 
the past few years we have had an ever-increasing call for service as we in- 
crease our number of multiple family dwellings which now includes Upham Road, 
Pleasant Street, Wilkins G]en, with the possible addition of multiple dwellings 
on Frairy Street, West Street, and the Housing for the Elderly on Pound Street. 
More personnel must be added to the department to assure proper patrol to the 
town. An addition to the regular walking beat should be added during warm 
weather because of numerous complaints of vandalism, littering, and loitering. 

The Auxilliary Police Officers under the direction of John Varnum have 
aided very much during the year, adding to our patrols on weekends and Fourth 
of July, Hallowe'en, and more particularly during the Bicentennial events that 
were conducted through the town. 

Training 

Officers Raymond Wheeler and Robert Roy have successfully completed a 10 
week basic police course at Boston Police Academy. Officers Ronald Kerr and 
Kevin Robinson began a 12 week basic police course at Boston Police Academy on 
October 27th. Two more officers on the department must complete the course, as 
required by law. 

Several officers have received investigation instruction from the State 
Police crime scene section of the Academy in Framingham, designed to teach the 
first officer responding to a crime to properly protect the crime scene to aid 
in gathering evidence to ultimately conclude a successful investigation. This 

40 



training has been beneficial in several instances. We now are making more use 
of photography and fingerprints etc., in criminal investigations. 

Officers Wheeler and Roy completed the EMT course at Leonard Morse Hospi- 
tal as did several auxilliaries and firefighters. We are required by the am- 
bulance law to use only EMTs on the ambulance as of July 1, 1977. The law also 
requires refresher training to maintain the EMT status and each police officer 
must complete a forty-hour "first responder" course in first aid by July 1, 
1977. 

Special officers Robert Meaney, Jr., Michael Cellucci, and Officer Rich- 
ard Bishop have completed a course at the Boston Red Cross Headquarters quali- 
fying them as instructors to implement the first responder law. 

I believe we are going to conduct first aid training on a continuing 
basis in order to comply with the EMT refresher requirements and the first 
responder requirements. 

Equipment 

We have had far less cost to maintain cruisers since we have had daily 
preventative maintenance at the Town Garage. Our two 1975 Chevrolets have run 
better, also as has our 1973 Ford. We were fortunate to receive a 1975 Ply- 
mouth from the Governor's Highway Safety Committee for the purpose of increas- 
ing patrols on major streets. We have received several films and slides, as 
well as a 16 mm. projector and slide projector from the Highway Safety Commit- 
tee also for the purpose of safety education, especially within our schools. 

Our radio maintenance costs have risen greatly during the year because of 
the age of the radios and repair costs have increased almost 100% in the past 
two years. We must consider purchasing new radios in the next two years. 

It becomes increasingly difficult to operate out of the grossly inade- 
quate facilities we now have for a police station. I have been working with 
a fine group of citizens acting as a police station study committee. I be- 
lieve the town needs to vote funds for a police station at once. 

Summary 

If our total work load was put on a graph, it would be fairly even in all 
periods of the year, because in each season there seems to be a particular 
type of problem arising; however, a graph on nuisance complaints and vandalism 
complaints would show a low at the coldest time of the year to a high during 
the warmest time of the year. Therefore, I have budgeted for two additional 
patrolmen during the summer months in the event we are unable to appoint two 
full-time men as I have requested for several years. This may help curb much 
of the aforementioned complaints. 

The average citizen does not realize what is happening in law enforcement 
today. I recommend all citizens pay close attention and demand to know what 
laws are being considered. Laws enacted in the past several years have all 
benefited the loudmouthed liberal such as the right to privacy law, which prac- 
tically handcuffs the police as well as employers from finding out any back- 
ground on anybody. Law and policies concerning crime and correction are put- 
ting more dangerous criminals on the street, either on furlough or in halfway 
type houses, which coupled with the liberal bail regulations in Massachusetts 
is responsible for the ever increasing list of crimes. All this is under the 
guise of rehabilitation. 

41 



The most recent slap at police departments is the proposal to lower the 
passing grade on police entrance exams. Complaints have been that police 
should be upgraded, better educated, better trained etc., and this is an exact 
opposite. We of the Medfield Police Department need support of all the citi- 
zens in town now more than ever. Please get involved in crime prevention and 
repeal of the liberally motivated laws so homeowners can stop being prisoners 
in their own home. 

Statistics for the year 1975 are as follows: 

Accidents Reported 242 

Personal injuries 31 

Fatalities 4 

Ambulance Trips 280 

Arrests 48 

Assaults 16 

Arson 12 
Assistance 

Other Departments 238 

Motorists 249 

General 391 
Automobiles 

Reported Stolen 13 

Stolen Motor Vehicles Recovered 19 

Citations issued 517 

Bomb Scares 18 

Breaking and Enterings 71 

Attempted 16 

Burglar Alarms Answered 471 

Civil Matters and Family Problems 49 

Closed Home Checked 368 

Court Attendance 218 

Disturbances 17 

Doors Found Unlocked or Open 69 

Windows Found Unlocked or Open 23 

Emergency Calls 169 

Fires Responded to by Police 95 

Funeral Escorts 28 

Indecent Exposures 7 

Investigations for Miscellaneous Complaints 1576 

Investigations With Other Departments 19 

Larceny 236 

Under $50.00 122 

Over $50.00 47 

Bicycles 43 

Motor Vehicles 13 

Shoplifting 11 

Attempted Larceny 17 

Lost Children Reported 21 

Lost Children Located by Police 10 

Malicious Destruction to Property 257 

Missing Patients Reported by State Hospital 111 

Missing Patients Returned by Police 72 

Missing Persons Reported 52 

Missing Persons Located by Police 7 

Messages Delivered 63 

Murder 1 



42 



Permits Issued: 

Gunsmith 1 

Ammunition Dealer 3 

Dealer License 1 

Firearms Identification Cards 447 

Pistol Permits 70 

Drunks Held in Protective Custody 36 

Bicycles Registered 163 

Stolen Bicycles Recovered 10 

Property Reported Lost 48 

Lost Property Turned In To Police 138 

Prowlers 59 

Rape 

Attempted Rape 

Summons Served 259 

Suspicious : 

Motor Vehicles 197 

Persons 134 

Phone Calls 58 

False Alarms Investigated 30 

Stolen Property Recovered 31 

Sudden Deaths Investigated 12 

I wish to thank department heads and personnel in all town departments 
for their cooperation throughout the year. Thanks especially to the Board of 
Selectmen, the Executive Secretary, and his town hall staff. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Wlttiam H. Mann, 
Chief of Police 

REPORT OF THE POLICE STATION 

STUDY COMMITTEE 

OCTOBER 28, 1975 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I. Town Meeting Charge 

The 1975 Annual Town Meeting authorized the appointment of a committee of 
five, consisting of the Police Chief, a member of the Warrant Committee 
and three citizens to investigate the need for additional Police facili- 
ties. This committee was organized during the spring and has been meet- 
ing since then. The committee initially took no position as to whether 
new facilities were needed and came to its conclusion only after several 
months of investigation. 

II. Approach 

A. Review of Prior Reports 

The committee began the investigation by reviewing the work of pre- 
vious committees, including the Report of the Fire and Police Station 
Building Committee, February 1960, and the Report of the Town Hall 
Facilities Committee, January 1974. Both of these reports concluded 
that police facilities were inadequate, and the 1974 report conclud- 

43 



ed "that alternative plans for expansion and improvement of the Med- 
field Police Department facilities and feasibility and implementation 
of such plans should be developed and with the least practical delay." 

B. Review of Present Police Facilities 

The present Police facilities in the Town Hall consist of approxi- 
mately 850 square feet, consisting of 3 rooms, a toilet, closets and 
cell area. The front room approximately 18' x 20' contains three 
desks, radio equipment, filing cabinets and serves as a reception 
area for the public, communications center and office. 

Behind this is a 5 ' x 18' space with the bulletin boards, finger- 
printing desk and filing cabinets; a 9' x 11' locker room, which in- 
cludes a toilet area, 4' x 8'; a 9' x 12' office for the Chief which 
also serves as a passage way to the cell area; an 11' x 13' cell 
block containing two cells, a toilet and a sink. 

III. Justification 

The committee requested information from the Chief justifying need 
for additional facilities, and indicating how the facilities would 
improve the operation of the Police Department. The main justifica- 
tions given by Chief Mann were: 

A. Lack of Security 

The present facilities do not allow separation of a prisoner from the 
general public during interrogation, booking or fingerprinting. Fre- 
quently, prisoners must be brought in the front door bringing them 
into direct contact with the public who might be standing in the re- 
ception area. In addition, the back entrance to the station offers 
convenient egress to a prisoner since it cannot be secured properly. 

In addition, prisoners wishing to use toilet facilities must be re- 
moved from the cell block since the toilet facilities are not located 
within the cell area. 

The public wishing to use toilet facilities in the Police Station must 
pass through the locker area to do so where firearms may be exposed. 

Finally, the lack of storage space presents a problem in the secure 
storage of stolen property or evidence. 

B. Privacy 

The lack of separate facilities for fingerprinting, booking and in- 
terrogation denies the prisoner and the public adequate privacy. The 
use of the Chief's office as a passageway to the cell area and, in- 
deed, the small size of the Police Station prevents the Chief or in- 
vestigating officer from conducting interviews in private and on 
occasion the Police Department has been forced to use the Town offices 
for interviewing witnesses or prisoners. The Chief feels strongly 
that the general public and prisoners are entitled to a certain mea- 
sure of privacy in their dealings with the Police Department and that 
the present facilities do not permit this. 

The employees of the Department must share their locker area, which 
serves as storage space for their uniforms, firearms and personal pro- 
perty, with the public since the only public toilet facilities are 
located within this area. 

44 



The lack of cell facilities for females and juveniles prevent segre- 
gation of these prisoners from adult males, which again is made worse 
by the lack of adequate toilet facilities in the cells. 

C. Public Safety 

The Police Station receives calls for police, fire and for ambulance 
services and serves as a dispatching area for all three departments. 
The distractions created for the dispatcher by the frequent presence 
of several people in the reception area, which is immediately adja- 
cent to the radio equipment, is highly undesirable. The separation 
of the radio dispatching facilities from the public areas in the sta- 
tion would improve dispatch operations. 

IV. Additional Facilities Needed 

Additional space needed for an adequate police station would include a 
larger lobby area with a small waiting room to better serve the public, 
a secure dispatching area, a records room with easy accessibility to the 
dispatch room, three small offices for a secretary, Sergeants, and inter- 
rogation; a conference area for departmental meetings, training sessions 
and meetings with public groups; a separate locker room with shower and 
toilet facilities for departmental personnel; a small dark room for photo- 
graphic work and a small booking area; a larger storage area, separate 
cell facilities for females and/or juveniles; public toilet facilities, 
storage space for departmental vehicles and stolen vehicles and property. 

The Chief would also like to see a pistol range within an expanded police 
facility and more storage space. 

V. Location of Police Facilities 

In reviewing the best location for a police facility the committee start- 
ed with two basic assumptions: 

A. That it is advantageous to have Police facilities located in or near 
the town's central business district and main arteries. 

B. That with the town's present financial situation at the present time, 
facilities should be provided at the least possible costs to the tax- 
payers. 

With these assumptions, the committee investigated the use of existing 
town buildings and/or land, existing private buildings and private land 
which could be acquired for such purpose. The public buildings consi- 
dered included the Library, the Town-owned house behind the Library, the 
Town Hall, the Recreation Center and the Fire Station. 

The Library and the Youth Center were ruled out because of deed and use 
restrictions. The house behind the Library was ruled out because of its 
size and location and since it was acquired for Library purposes. The 
Town Hall was ruled out because of the lack of available space and the 
large cost of renovating what space would be available to meet police 
needs. 

The land was ruled out because it would require new construction starting 
from scratch, which the committee felt was not financially feasible at 
this point. Private buildings were ruled out because of the cost of ac- 
quisition and renovation and because of the tax loss which would , result 

45 



from taking such property off the tax rolls. Private lands were also 
ruled out because of the cost of acquisition and the cost of construction. 

The location which was finally agreed upon by the committee as the most 
practical for additional police facilities was the area adjacent to the 
Medfield Fire headquarters. The site was favored because it was central, 
the land was already owned by the Town and certain facilities of the Fire 
Station could be utilized by the Police. The same location was original- 
ly recommended in the 1960 Report of the Fire and Police Station Building 
Committee. At the time a Police facility, somewhat smaller than the one 
recommended by the Chief, could have been built for approximately $19,000, 

VI . Recommendation 

Based on the above, the Police Station Study Committee concludes that: 

A. Additional Police facilities are necessary to provide for adequate 
security, privacy and public safety. 

B. The space for such facilities is not available in the present 
location. 

C. The most feasible location for such a facility from both the finan- 
cial and policing point of view is on Town-owned land adjacent to 
the Medfield Fire Station. 

D. That further delay in the construction of such facilities will in 
the long run only cost the Town more money. 

E. That the Town should appropriate $3,000 for preparation of prelimi- 
nary plans and specifications for police facilities to be located 
adjacent to the Medfield Fire headquarters, consisting of approxi- 
mately 3,000 square feet so that construction of such a facility can 
begin during the summer of 1976. 

Respectfully submitted, 

IhoJwJun W. KuAknQA., Chairman 

ZhaxJLu, W. Gnlhiin 

U-ilLiam H. Mann 

TkomaA A. McGinniA 

TnomaA I/. Sweeney, Si. 

Police Station Study Committee 



46 



THE AMBULANCE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

During 1975, the Ambulance Committee comprised of Dr. James Sullivan, 
Austin C. Buchanan, Chief William H. Mann, Fire Chief Joseph Ryan and Execu- 
vice Secretary Michael Sullivan, met many times in an effort to improve 
Emergency Medical Service in the town of Medfield. 

In May our new van-type Dodge ambulance was placed in service. A few 
minor problems with the air conditioner and the suspension have been correct- 
ed, and the ambulance has been used extensively. We completed a total of 280 
trips in 1975, most of which were from Medfield to a hospital. Some were 
transfers of Medfield residents from hospital to home or to a nursing home. 
We also responded to Millis A times, Dover 3 times, and Walpole on mutual aid. 
We called for aid from Millis 2 times, Westwood 2 times, and Walpole 1 time. 

Because we utilize volunteer people to man the ambulance, I am hoping to 
have twenty Emergency Medical Technicians available. We now have ten and 
seven others in the process. We do comply with the law as far as trained 
personnel being available to respond. Each EMT must complete refresher train- 
ing to maintain his knowledge and to be recertified every two years. I have 
requested a sum of money to defray personnel expenses in attending the re- 
fresher courses. 

The Ambulance Committee would like to purchase a digital blood pressure 
unit for inside the ambulance and a tone-alert system for calling the person- 
nel. I have inserted a request for money for these items in the 1976-77 
budget. 

We have found over the years that we have the most difficulty getting 
ambulance attendants during the daytime. For the past year, we have been for- 
tunate to have a CETA employee, Edward Carreiro, working as a firefighter- 
ambulance attendant during the daytime, solving the problem and lessening our 
response time considerably. I have requested this program be continued and 
if not available through CETA to create the position with town funds. 

We have the ambulance completely equipped in accordance with the ambu- 
lance rules and regulations except for the ambulance-to-hospital radio. Now 
that the office of EMS has released the criteria for the radio, we will pur- 
chase it shortly. 

We are participating in area 33 EMS, a group of ten communities in the 
area of Norwood hospital. Fire Chief Joseph Ryan and myself have attended 
monthly meetings to discuss mutual problems concerning ambulances and hospital 
relations and general upgrading of EMS. As a result of this active participa- 
tion and our efforts put forth during 1974 and 1975, I expect to receive a sum 
of money from OEMS to assist in the purchase of the ambulance-to-hospital 
radio. 

Austin C. "Buck" Buchanan was promoted to Deputy Director in charge of 
training in OEMS and resigned as a member of our Ambulance Advisory Committee. 
We all appreciate his valuable contribution to the town and wish him success 

47 



in his new position. In September, the Board of Selectmen appointed Robert E. 
Meaney, Jr. to replace "Buck" on the committee. Robert is an EMT and an 
instructor as well as a police intern and an ambulance attendant. 

During 1975, I was officially placed in charge of the ambulance by vote 
of the Board of Selectmen following a recommendation of the Ambulance Advisory 
Committee. Fire Chief Ryan still maintains the ambulance in good order and 
houses it in the fire station. 

I would like to thank all members of the committee who assisted me and 
also thank members of Auxiliary Police and others who have so ably operated 
the ambulance during all the emergencies we have had throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WUlstam H. Mann, 
Chief of Police 



48 



THE CIVIL DEFENSE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I submit herewith the annual report of the Civil Defense Department. 
1975 has been a year of continued activity by the many volunteers who make 
up the various services of the department. The most active being the Auxili- 
ary Police who hold monthly meetings and drills, provide additional manpower 
for special town activities and support to the regular police. The training 
and skills obtained by the Auxiliary Police under the direction of Deputy 
Director John Varnum, provide a ready source of trained manpower for supple- 
menting the regular police force. Over the years there have been many offi- 
cers inducted and trained in the civil defense program who later transferred 
to the regular department. The officers and members of the auxiliary police 
force are to be commended for their continuing efforts. 

There have been many members of the civil defense department who have 
become trained as Emergency Medical Technicians, and as such, provide emergency 
medical care and transportation of the sick and injured with the Town Ambulance 
Several of the members have obtained additional certification and have con- 
ducted emergency life saving care classes for the public within the school 
system and other community oriented facilities. It is planned that there will 
be more emergency care courses presented for the general public in the coming 
year. It is most important that there be at least one emergency care trained 
person in each household. This has been a national goal for some years. In 
Medfield we are doing something about it. 

The Federal Government conducted a survey of leading Civil Defense Depart- 
ments in the Commonwealth and Medfield was one of those evaluated. A report of 
the successful evaluation should be forthcoming to the Board of Selectmen soon. 

I wish at this time to thank all who have given of their time and talent 
to the efforts of this department to make Medfield a safer and more healthful 
community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Aa6£6a C. Buchanan, 
Director 






49 



THE TOWN CLOCK 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The town clock located in the tower of the Unitarian Church at the corner 
of North and Frairy Streets continues to indicate the hours and minutes in 
good fashion. If it were not for the power outages caused by storms, Boston 
Edison Company construction and resulting interruptions of power, individuals 
turning wrong switches, the clock would continue to indicate the correct time 
without fail. 

The hands and face of the clock should be painted. I suggest that this 
be looked into and that the painting be scheduled with any painting that may 
be planned for the church building. It should be less expensive to paint the 
face and hands while the necessary scaffolding is in place for the rest of the 
building. 

I have received several requests to look into the possibility of reacti- 
vating the striking mechanism so that the clock would again toll the hour. 
If the Selectmen think this a good idea, I shall obtain some cost estimates 
for the necessary parts, and the Board might prepare an article for the Annual 
Town Meeting to appropriate the funds. 

I would like to suggest that the Board consider the appointment of one or 
two additional "Keepers of the Clock." My work is keeping me out of town a 
good deal of the time and I am not always immediately available to re-set the 
clock following power failures, storms etc. There are others in the community 
who I am sure would be willing to share the honor of the position, and such 
additional coverage would tend to provide a more reliable indicator of the 
hour. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Austin C. Buchanan, 
Keeper of the Town Clock 



50 



THE WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 





1974 


1975 


1976 




Actual 


Actual 


Estimate 


Total Services 


2,385 


2,430 


2,460 


Added Customers 


40 


45 


40 


Thousand Gallons Pumped 


308,482 


328,658 


348,000 


Thousand Gallons Sold 


203,328 


214,300 


230,000 


Water Sold 


$122,046. 


$128,579. 


$138,000. 


Expenses 


$ 81,521. 


$ 98,118. 


$115,546. 


Debt Services: 








Smith Station &' Wells 


$ 32,675. 


$ 31,575. 


$ 30,525. 



The Rocky Lane water main was completed in September, 1975. The 12 inch 
diameter main has improved the pressure problems experienced in the Indian 
Hill area. It has also created a loop between Granite and South Streets, im- 
proving distribution in those areas of High Street. 

Well #4, off High Street, was successfully developed and a contract for 
construction of the pumping facility was signed in December 1975. The sched- 
ule for completion is July 1976. Operation of this facility will assist in 
sustaining adequate pressure and volume in the southern end of town and in- 
crease the overall water supply. 

The new Waste Water Treatment Plant began accepting sewage on March 3, 
1975. The plant is functioning very well and the Town has been commended by 
several State Agencies for the quality of the effluent entering the receiving 
waters of the Charles River. The initial phase interceptors have been comple- 
ted and street sewers in the Lowell Mason, Marlyn Estate and Kamark areas have 
been completed. Flow from existing and recently connected users is being 
treated at the plant. The old sewerage beds have been dismantled and covered, 
eliminating the odor of past years. 

The Board was reorganized in September due to the resignations of Allen 
Holmes and Charles Cotton. The time and effort expended by these men on behalf 
of the Town is truly appreciated by those who served with them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Zhix.(L<L 0. TobloA&on, Chairman 
John V. \$WUumt>, Clerk 

LoIXLYld V. %<L\)VW.Q<L t 
Water and Sewerage Board 



51 



THE MASTER PLAN 
IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Medfield Master Plan Implementation Committee hereby submits its 
Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 1975. 

The initial task for MPIC in connection with the fourth phase of the 
Master Plan updating (a Commercial and Industrial Impact Study, Plan and 
Program) was a full day traffic and parking space utilization count. This 
was accomplished with assistance, much appreciated, from Scout Troop 89. 
Following that, a complete listing of businesses and professional people in 
Medfield was compiled. Due to the great interest expressed, this list was 
distributed to many town departments and will be updated early in 1976. 

A business survey was then developed with valuable contributions made 
by representatives of the Planning Board, Medfield Development and Industrial 
Commission, League of Women Voters and the business community. The survey 
was conducted by personal interview, with considerable help from the League 
of Women Voters and Development and Industrial Commission members and a small 
number of volunteers. The results were tabulated in three parts: Central 
Business District, Outside the Central Business District and resident res- 
ponses, and will be included in the Metcalf & Eddy report. 

Because of MPIC's concern for and interest in the improvement of the 
Central Business District, close contact was and continues to be maintained 
with the Planning Board and Medfield Development and Industrial Commission. 
In addition, the Selectmen appointed MPIC representatives to the Meeting 
House Pond and Library Study Committees. 

The financial strains on the Town were such that many articles sponsored 
by various town departments, in accordance with the Master Plan, were dis- 
missed at both the Annual Town Meeting and November Special Town Meeting. 
Annual Town Meeting did support the continued program of planned replacement 
of capital equipment and the repair and reconstruction of streets needing such 
work. Approval was given to the water main loop closing between Rocky Lane 
and Granite Street, as well as Development and Industrial Commission articles 
to complete the parking facility behind Town Hall and to improve the appear- 
ance of the area in the front of Town Hall. Funding was also voted for 
Meeting House Pond and the adjacent area. The complete rewriting of the 
Zoning Bylaws received approval at the Special Town Meeting called within the 
Annual Town Meeting. 

The November Special Town Meeting voted to correct wording and include 
two parcels of land relative to the original Noon Hill article #10 of Annual 
Town Meeting, 1974. Support was also expressed for converting the former 
sewer beds to a community garden project, to be initiated in the Spring, 1976. 

The Medfield Master Plan is used and accepted because of the interest and 
cooperation of all town departments and personnel. MPIC gratefully acknow- 
ledges the support of all those employed or involved in town government and 



52 



the residents of the Town of Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Jane fJLbie^ingeA, Chairman 

MaAgcuieX BancAofit 

SaAA^zld Bimnan 

SandAa. TiXok 

Hanson C. Robbing 

fiancAA Rot>i>i 

Caxol Shaw 

MnumdoJi J. Smith, 3k. 

Robert N. labo. 

Master Plan Implementation Committee 

BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Board of Appeals on Zoning submits herewith their report for the year 
ending December 31, 1975. 

The Board was organized as follows: 

James T. Regan, Chairman 
Ralph C. Copeland, Clerk 
James 0. Aronson, Member 
William F. Spang, Associate 
Mildred E. Willis, Secretary 

Mr. Ralph C. Copeland resigned from the Board and on July 10, 1975, Mr. 
Robert F. Sylvia was appointed to the Board and elected Clerk. 

During the year the following applications were heard and decided: 

1 Special Permit for enlargement of a veterinary clinic and 
Variance from the side line requirements. Allowed. 

1 Variance from lot line requirements. Allowed. 

1 Variance from the Lot Depth and Width requirements for 9 lots. Allowed. 

2 Special Permits for filling of flood plain land. Denied. 

1 Special Permit for motorbike trails and membership club. Denied. 

1 Special Permit for 4 apartments where 3 previously existed. Allowed. 

1 Special Permit for home occupation. Denied. 

1 Special Permit and Variances for area, frontage and depth. Allowed. 

1 Special Permit for home occupation. Allowed. 

1 Variance from frontage requirements for multi-family dwelling. Allowed, 



53 



1 Variance and/or Special Permit for driveway use. Allowed. 

1 Special Permit to operate a commercial dog kennel. Allowed. 

1 Variance from lot line requirements. Allowed. 

1 Petition to override Selectmen's decision. Denied. 

In each case the decision of the Board of Appeals was unanimous, 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jam&A T. Rq.qo.vi, Chairman 
Board of Appeals on Zoning 



THE PLANNING BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Medfield Planning Board hereby submits its Annual Report for the 
year ending December 31, 1975. 

RESIDENTIAL GROWTH OF TOWN 

The Planning Board, after following the procedure as set out in Chapter 41 
of the General Laws - Municipal Planning and Subdivision Control legislation, 
approved one preliminary plan totalling approximately 80 lots. 

The Board released 29 lots for building in subdivisions and signed 21 
plans that did not come under the Subdivision Control Law. 

A table is included indicating subdivision lots approved for building, 
and the number of lots remaining in each subdivision to be built. The table 
runs for 1956 to date. 

(SEE SEPARATE SHEET FOR TABLE) 

CONTINUED UPDATING OF THE MASTER PLAN 

A "Commercial and Industrial Impact Study, Plan and Program for the Town 
of Medfield" is close to completion by our planning consultant, Metcalf & Eddy, 
assisted by the Master Plan Implementation Commission, as well as other Town 
Boards and the League of Women Voters. This will be a valuable aid in Plan- 
ning Board deliberations relative to the Central Business District and Indus- 
trial areas. 

OTHER ACTIVITIES 

Members of the Board have attended various meetings with other Town 
Boards and the Sidewalk Study Committee and, in addition, each Planning Board 
member has several liaisons with other Town Committees to keep the Board ap- 
prised of what other committees are doing. Board members have also attended 
meetings of the MAPC and Massachusetts Federation of Planning Boards and a 
meeting called by Representative George Sprague to explain changes in the new 

54 



Zoning Enabling Act, which has been passed by the State Legislature. 

A complete revision of the Medfield Zoning Bylaw was presented to the 
1975 Town Meeting and was unanimously accepted; however, the Attorney General 
took exception to Section 9.5.1 as voted by the Town and disallowed it. At a 
Special Town Meeting held on November 3, 1975, the Board proposed a new 
Section 9.5.1. At the Town Meeting an amendment was added and voted. A 
ruling has not yet been received from the Attorney General on this vote of 
the Town Meeting. 

Whitman & Howard, an engineering consultant, was again engaged to review 
preliminary and definitive subdivision plans, to inspect subdivision street 
construction for the purpose of estimating surety, and to perform other en- 
gineering services as needed. 

Designs & Devices, a graphics design consultant, was contracted to review 
the Town signage problem and assist the Board in developing a Commercial 
Graphic Standards Bylaw. The Commercial Graphic Standards Bylaw will be pre- 
sented to the 1976 Annual Town Meeting for approval. 

The Planning Board recommended and the Town voted to accept all or por- 
tions of Carmen Circle, Eastmount Road, Evergreen Way, Fieldstone Drive, Grace 
Drive, Indian Hill Road, Lee Road, Longmeadow Road, Nauset Street, Oxbow Road, 
Ridge Road, Spring Valley Road, Steven Lane, Surrey Run, The Paddock Lane and 
Wilson Street. 

The premises of the Frances Cafe on Frairy Street were rezoned to 
"Business" by Town Meeting vote. 

During the year the Planning Board has reviewed sign application requests 
and parking plans for new buildings. 

Four appointments to the MPIC were made; i.e., Sandra Fitch, Francis 
Rossi, Alexander Smith, Jr. and Robert Zabe. 

GENERAL 

The Board acknowledges the cooperation and assistance of other Town 
Boards and departments, with special mention of the Master Plan Implementation 
Committee for its energetic work on the Commercial and Industrial Study. 

All regular Planning Board meetings are open to the public. Requests for 
information may be obtained from the Planning Board Assistant, Mrs. John C. 
Willis, at either 359-8505 or 359-2726. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sand/m G. Mun&zy, Chairman 

KznneXk M. ChildA, M. , Vice Chairman 

Donald J. MaaVonald, Secretary 

C. ZickaAd McCaUoagk 

Bulges* P. Standlzy 

Medfield Planning Board 



55 



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Photo by Edward Carreiro 



LUMBERJACK SHOW 



58 



THE TRUSTEES OF THE 
MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Trustees met eleven times last year in an attempt to maintain and 
improve the services and facilities of the Public Library. 

Efforts this year were made to create a Study Committee to review the 
space needs of the Public Library. Unfortunately, little has been accomplished 
in this direction. Hopefully the committee appointed by the Selectmen will 
meet and commence to study this important need. Our situation is reaching the 
stage where we will have to weed out a sizable portion of our collection, cur- 
tail the purchasing of books and possibly lose state aid. The Trustees bear a 
portion of the responsibility for inaction in this matter. 

This year was one of austerity and few major projects were attempted. 
The Board studied replacing four downspouts on the building but found that 
this project was beyond our means. We are replacing one gutter now with view 
to the replacement of the other three in the future. The Board reviewed vari- 
ous solutions toward refinishing the tables in the reading room. This proved 
very expensive and was postponed until next year. The Trustees are trying to 
make this room pleasant and comfortable for our patrons. The Library Annex, 
present home of the Historical Society, was painted this year. 

The Trustees are very pleased with the work of Connie Jones who has com- 
pleted her first year as Children's Librarian. Under her direction, the 
children's room has become one of the brightest spots in the library. There 
have been many new programs, plays, skits and even pets added to the Children's 
Library and circulation has dramatically increased for the first time in sever- 
al years. 

The library has seen interesting services added this year. The Trustees 
authorized the purchase of three institutional museum passes, and approved 
the offering of a pattern exchange for our patrons. 

The Board regretted losing Mr. Bravo, our custodian, who resigned due to 
a consolidation of town janitorial services. Were were also sorry to lose the 
services of Mrs. Copithorne in the children's department because of a serious 
illness. 

In closing, the Trustees wish to express their thanks for the support 
extended by the Warrant Committee, Personnel Board, our patrons and the town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JamoJs F. Bcuvton, Chairman 
KznneXh G. FeXttg, Vice-Chairman 
Jane P. GuZhtilz., Secretary 
Vavld L. WAlmcvUh 
tAoviy ElZm. Vonahiid 
Banbasia A. Houck 



59 



THE MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report as Head Librarian for the year ending December 
31, 1975. 



STATISTICS 



CIRCULATION FIGURES 

Adult Department 
Children's Room 
Interlibrary Loan 
Museum passes 



Total Circulation 



46 


,748 


19 


,887 




426 




140 


67 


,201 


1 


,089 


20 


,183 



New Books Purchased 
Volumes Presently Owned 

Circulation figures show an increase over 1974 of approximately 3,000 
books in the adult department and 1,500 in the children's room. 

The new registrations we had in 1975 bring the total number of borrowers 
to 4,668 or almost half the town's population. This percentage is considered 
to be high according to state statistics. 

The new books purchased this year pushes the total number owned to over 
20,000. Since the present building has a capacity for about 19,000 volumes, 
we are very crowded and would be out of shelf space if it were not for the 
number of books in circulation. Noteworthy additions made this year are Dun 
and Bradstreet's Million Dollar Directory and Middle Market Directory in addi- 
tion to Standard and Poor's Register of Corporations and Directors and Execu- 
tives . These reference works enable us to serve the businessmen of our commu- 
nity better. 

Several new services have been added this year. One of the most popular 
is the offering of institutional membership passes to the Museum of Science, 
Museum of Fine Arts and the Children's Museum. The passes, which allow fami- 
lies to be admitted free, were made possible through the Peters Fund. The 
library also began a food coupon and sewing pattern exchange which are appre- 
ciated by thrifty shoppers. 

Art exhibits of paintings by local residents featured works by Mrs. 
Kathleen Fiske, Mrs. Margaret Munger, Edward Band and Kurt Kellar. In June 
the Medfield Garden Club held a three day Flower Show at the library, which 
not only added beauty to the reading room, but also gave people a chance to 
vote for their favorite arrangement. 

Films from the collection at Boston Public Library were borrowed during 
the year for the Medfield State Hospital, Med-Vale Nursing Home, St. Edward's 
Church and the Boy Scouts. Special interlibrary loan requests for books came 
from as far away as the University of Texas Library and the Tennessee State 
Library. 

60 



During the year we were pleased to bring library service to the residents 
of S.H.A.R.P. (South Shore Alcoholic Rehabilitation Program) , who are located 
on the grounds of the Medfield State Hospital. 

Connie Jones has completed her first year as Children's Librarian and 
has made many noteworthy changes. The story and craft hour has grown to four 
sessions, two held in the fall and two in the spring. One-hundred children 
ages four and five participate. The Jaycee-ettes of Medfield have generously 
donated their help with the afternoon session in addition to giving money for 
decorations in the Children's Room. 

During the winter months, a Creative Drama Group was held for second 
through sixth graders, which culminated in an afternoon of skits for the 
Story Hour children. 

A new Summer Program was begun which included a weekly morning story time 
for four to seven year olds and an afternoon special event conducted by sever- 
al of Medfield' s talented people. Among the most popular programs were the 
magic show and the making of stained glass cookies. 

A birthday box which can be borrowed for children's parties has been 
added. It contains games, decorations, books and party ideas. The children's 
room has resident gerbils and during the year has also had a rabbit, hamster 
and chameleons as guests. 

Special thanks is due to the Meadowland Players, a local drama group, 
who generously donated $200.00 for the purchase of books on plays and the 
theater. We also wish to thank Corning Glass for their donation of five 
copies of the recently reprinted History of Medfield . To the numerous people 
who volunteered their time and services to the library during the year, we owe 
a debt of gratitude. I would also like to add my personal thanks to the 
Library Trustees who have given their continued support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jane 8. kiokoji 
Head Librarian 



STAFF 

Jane B. Archer, Head Librarian 
Barbara Friend, Assistant Librarian 
Connie Jones, Children's Librarian 

Constance Yena, Senior Aide 

REGULAR AIDES 

Ruth Justice Deborah Kalweit 

Marilyn Erickson Lillian Kalweit 

Elizabeth Downey Sandra Flagg 



61 



THE HOUSING AUTHORITY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

and Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

In March Mr. Charles Sloan completed his time of service on the Medfield 
Housing Authority after faithfully serving as treasurer since 1968. Mr. Rich- 
ard Knopf was elected for a five year term. Unfortunately, later in the year 
Mr. Knopf as well as Mr. Richard Palson who also had been on the Housing Autho- 
rity since its formation and served as Chairman for many years, found it neces- 
sary to resign. The Housing Authority in a joint meeting with the Selectmen 
elected Mrs. Dorothy Anastasi and Mr. Lawrence O'Dell to fill these unexpired 
terms. 

The Housing Authority is extremely pleased to have signed a contract for 
the construction of its Pound Street project, Housing for the Elderly, in 
August 1975. Our contractor, Paul Sardella Construction Co., Inc., began al- 
most immediately thereafter. It is now expected that the project will be com- 
pleted on time and be ready for occupancy in July or August of 1976. The 
Housing Authority was most gratified by the large number of citizens who at- 
tended the groundbreaking ceremonies and sincerely hopes that the completion 
of the Pound Street project will repay the many individuals in Medfield who 
have supported its efforts in the past. 

In August 1976 the Housing Authority employed Mr. Frank Gardner as Clerk 
of the Works for the Pound Street project. Mr. Gardner essentially acts as 
the Housing Authority's inspector in conjunction with our architect, Robert 
Charles Associates, Inc. 

All individuals who have applied in the past for apartments at the Pound 
Street project now appear on the Housing Authority's list and will be notified 
at a later date as to the availability of the apartment and the date on which 
they can expect to occupy the apartment if they so choose. The Authority 
expects that all individuals who have applied for occupancy at the Pound 
Street project and are qualified under state regulations will have an apart- 
ment if they so desire. In addition, the Housing Authority urges any person 
who desires an apartment and who has not made an application to the Housing 
Authority to make such an application as soon as possible. The secretary to 
the Housing Authority, Marie Roberts, is available at the Town Hall to receive 
applications and to answer any questions. The Housing Authority is most 
pleased to have the capable assistance of Mrs. Roberts and also wishes to ex- 
press its appreciation to Helen Rohnstock who is employed as accountant. 

The Housing Authority is very pleased with the progress of the Pound 
Street project and feels that it has partially fulfilled its obligation to the 
elderly citizens of Medfield. However, much to its dismay, most of its time 
during the past year has been devoted to a continued conflict with the Massa- 
chusetts Housing Finance Agency (MHFA) . 

The local press has reported the continued dispute on an almost weekly 
basis. In addition, the Housing Authority made a report to the Town Meeting 
held in November. Essentially, the conflict revolves around the question of 
who will select tenants for the project and what the criteria will be. The 
Wilkins Glen project received the approval of many organizations and indivi- 

62 




Photo by Ann Thompson 

CHAIRMAN BRUCE ORAVEC AND REPRESENTATIVE GEORGE R. SPRAGUE AT GROUND BREAKING 
CEREMONIES FOR ELDERLY HOUSING PROJECT - POUND STREET 






63 



duals in Medfield because of the representation that a local body would select 
the tenants based upon general criteria related to need. Over the past year, 
MHFA has asserted its position that the Housing Authority does not have the 
right to select tenants except in very limited circumstances and that it must 
select tenants in accordance with a rigid selection system developed by the 
MHFA. In addition, the MHFA has insisted that the Housing Authority take 
steps to meet the Affirmative Marketing goal. The Housing Authority stands 
firm on its position as the duly named tenant selection committee with the 
complete right to select tenants. The tenants have been selected on the basis 
of need and with an order the Housing Authority believes to be fair and equit- 
able. At all times, it has attempted to solve the housing problems of Medfield 
citizens, but realizes it also has an obligation to residents of other towns 
because of the involvement of state funding. The Housing Authority believes 
that it has more than met its obligations under any reasonable type of Affir- 
mative Marketing program. 

The Housing Authority's ability to negotiate effectively with the MHFA 
has been in large part due to the unanimous support which it received at the 
Town Meeting held last November. The Housing Authority is extremely grateful 
for that support. 

The ability to solve the problem of WiJcins Glen on a practical level and 
to acknowledge almost completely what was set out to be done is attributable 
in large measure to the fact that the developer, McNeil and Associates, and 
the individuals associated with the developer have stood 100% behind their 
representations to the Town of Medfield. They have in fact placed the Housing 
Authority's selected tenants into Wilkins Glen at its direction and at great 
risk to their relationship with the MHFA. The developer has dealt with the 
Housing Authority in a manner which the Authority believes is completely in 
accord with the best interests of the Town of Medfield. 

It is the earnest hope of the Housing Authority that the problem with the 
MHFA can be fully resolved in the coming year and that the Pound Street pro- 
ject and the Wilkins Glen project can proceed to be operated in the best inte- 
rests of the citizens of the Town of Medfield and the Commonwealth. 

It is because of the cooperation of the Board of Selectmen and the Execu- 
tive Secretary that the Authority has been able to establish a temporary office 
in the Town Hall. This arrangement has enabled the Housing Authority to carry 
on its duties in a more efficient manner. The Housing Authority is grateful 
to Mr. John Bradstreet for helping to set up the accounting procedures. Also, 
the assistance of Town Hall personnel is very much appreciated. 

The Housing Authority continues to meet on the second and fourth Tuesdays 
of every month in open meeting at the Town Hall. All interested persons are 
very welcome to attend. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Bluce J. Oiavec, Chairman 
UlchazZ W. TammeAO, Vice Chairman 
Law/tewce M. O'VelZ, Treasurer 
Voiotky V. KvicUitCbdi., Asst. Treasurer 
Hazat R. Flank, Secretary 
Medfield Housing Authority 



64 






THE CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The members of the Conservation Commission have had a very active year 
with regular meetings, hearings in regard to Chapter 131, Section 40 of the 
Wetlands Protection Act, land acquisition, as well as working with other 
boards of the Town trying to help resolve violations of the flood plain laws 
which require a hearing by the Board of Appeals. 

Four parcels of land were acquired along Noon Hill Street for which nego- 
tiations were started some time ago. Also, we are very grateful to Mr. & Mrs. 
Elmer Morse of Walpole, Mass. for their gift to the citizens of the Town of 
3.4 acres in the Plain Street area. 

We are happy to report that the Noon Hill acquisition is progressing and 
that the main part of the project is under control. Our sincere thanks go to 
the taxpayers and citizens of the Town for their help, cooperation and patience 
regarding delays at the State and Federal levels. It is hoped that any remain- 
ing problems will be resolved in the near future. 

The annual Fader Conservation Award was presented this year to Mrs. Ellen 
Gifford for her many years of devoted service to the Conservation Commission 
as a regular member and as its chairman during the acquisition of land for the 
sewage disposal plant. 

A considerable amount of work was done on Town owned land in the Noon Hill 
area by trimming roads and trails, installing culverts and making roads acces- 
sible to fire equipment. Also, dead and sickly trees were removed and a re- 
forestation program is being discussed. We are grateful for the help received 
from the highway and other departments of the Town in these projects which 
were partly funded by the C.E.T.A. program of the Federal government. 

Due to the economic conditions of the country, we are not contemplating 
any large projects in the near future. However, we are still trying to acquire 
land either by gift or conservation easement as well as by tax title. 

We would like to express our sincere thanks to all department superinten- 
dents, secretaries and all other personnel at the Town Hall who have always 
had time to help with the many questions and problems that arise during the 
course of a year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WoJbio V<L&<LXZMll, Chairman 

RoboAt KsLnAman 

J ant Min&>yLngoA 

Robwt Mcleod 

HaviAon C. Robbing 

Ituaui SZsLdoJL 

WMJUam WaUk 

RoboJiX Bryant, Associate Member 

Vn.2,dQAA,ck HcWUAOn, Associate Member 

Ald&n H. VmboA, Associate Member 

Conservation Commission 

65 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

and Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

The Board of Health activities during the calendar year 1975 included 
the following: 

FOOD SERVICE AND RETAIL FOOD STORES 

All food service establishments and retail stores were inspected at least 
twice, and most were checked four times as is our current policy. A few in- 
stances of improperly operating equipment and substandard facilities were 
found and corrected to comply with our rules and regulations. Also, in view 
of the problems some surrounding towns had with mobile food service vendors, 
we initiated the licensing and inspection of these units. 

As proposed in last year's report, we plan to initiate food handler sani- 
tary training courses this spring as soon as the proposed Federal Food Service 
Sanitation Guidelines become effective. 

Our Registered Sanitarian, Mr. John J. Keefe, made 137 inspections during 
1975. Most of these inspections were at food service establishments and retail 
food stores. 

SEWAGE AND WATER SUPPLY 

Beginning in April 1975, we acquired the services of Mr. William R. Domey, 
a registered professional engineer, to act as our agent in matters concerning 
on-site sewage and water supply. Mr. Domey 's professional assistance has been 
valuable in coping with a number of borderline lots, failed systems, and in 
the development of a new set of rules and regulations for water supply and 
sewage scheduled to become effective in January 1976. 

The Board of Health, acting in cooperation with the Water and Sewerage 
Board, developed a set of rules and regulations regarding the abandonment of 
on-site sewage systems and the disposal of septic effluent and transportation. 
With the availability of the common sanitary sewer in new areas, a number of 
on-site system abandonments were approved. 

GARBAGE COLLECTION 

The garbage contract was renewed with Francis J. Cassidy of Medway. 
Collections continue to be made once a week during the winter seasons and 
twice a week during the summer. 

HINKLEY MEMORIAL POND 

The Hinkley Swim Pond was inspected weekly during the summer of 1975. 
Although bacteria counts remained low, visability was marginal and the pond 
was closed once for two days. Based on this unfavorable experience, the 
Board informed the Park and Recreation Commission that it appeared as if the 
pond could not be operated in accordance with the requirements of Article VII 

66 



of the State Sanitary Code unless some modifications were made in the operating 
of the facility. Specific modifications were recommended, and we await further 
word on these plans. 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

In order to cope with the increasing number of animal control complaints, 
the Board of Health has drafted a new set of animal control rules and regula- 
tions which are scheduled to be adopted in January 1976. Residents are reminded 
that the keeping of horses, livestock and certain other animals and fowl, ex- 
cept by permit of the Board of Health, is prohibited. 

All horses must be immunized against Encephalitis annually and dogs must 
be immunized against rabies by the age of six months and revaccinated at inter- 
vals not exceeding 24 months, as a condition to being licensed. 257 dogs were 
immunized at the 1975 Rabies Clinic. The 1976 Clinic will be held on April 10. 

Our Animal Inspector, Mr. Richard Ellsworth reminds the residents that all 
animal bites or scratches must be reported immediately to him, or to the Board 
of Health, in order that he may quarantine the animal, and if necessary, ar- 
range for a laboratory examination. 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE 

The Visiting Nurse Association of Dover, Medfield, Norfolk has again been 
certified by the Social Security Administration, Inc. , as a participating home 
health agency in the Medicare and Medicaid programs, having met all the require- 
ments. We are happy to welcome a new member to our staff this year. She is 
Mrs. Annette Fraser, R.N. of Medfield, and she will be working with Mrs. Arlene 
Whitney, R.N. , and Mrs. Lynda Pollock, R.N. All three staff members attended 
the seven sessions of in-service education; six at Norfolk County Hospital in 
Braintree, and 1 in Medfield. Mrs. Pollock attended a several session seminar 
sponsored by Norfolk Mental Health Association. Total meetings attended = 27. 
Four L.P.N, students from the Peabody School in Norwood each spent one day ac- 
companying a nurse on her rounds to become acquainted with the many facets of 
public health. We also prepared statistics for various state agencies. 

Medfield Statistics for 1975: 

Senior Citizens Blood Pressure Clinics 8 Total attendance 144 
Immunization Clinic 1 Immunized 71 

Four Day Care Centers (Nursery & Kindergarten) were visited for exami- 
nation of childrens' health records, teacher T.B. certifications, and 
one teaching session on health and hygiene for each school. 

Assisted school nurses with pre-school vision screening clinic spon- 
sored by the Lions Club. 

Worked on general public Blood-Pressure Clinic at Baptist Church. 

Orientation, Instructions and Evaluation of Home Health Aids. 

Equipment loaned to twenty patients. 

Several trips made to State Biological and Diagnostic Laboratory. 



67 



Mantoux testing and reading done for anyone requesting T.B. test, 
with the school nurses doing some of school faculty and personnel. 

Communicable disease follow-up: T.B., Salmonella, Hepatitis, etc. 

Many phone calls for advice, referral and resources available. 

No. Cases = 79 No. Visits = 722 - Nursing Visits 

No. Cases = 3 No. Visits =8 - Physical Therapy 

No. Cases = 5 No. Visits =79 - Home Health Aids 

PERMITS ISSUED 



Food Service - Restaurants and Counter Bars 

Food Service - Stores and Markets 

Temporary Food Service 

Food Service - Mobile 

Milk Licenses - Vehicle and Stores 

Bakeries 

Ice Cream Making 

Laundromats 

Funeral Directors 

Syringe Permits 

Horse and Animal Permits 

Septic Installers Permits 

Septic Pumpers 

Carters 

Septic Abondonments for common sanitary sewer 

Board of Health Permits for Building 

Sub-Division Plans (Preliminary) 

TOTAL INCOME OF BOARD OF HEALTH 



12 

6 

7 

2 

10 

2 

1 

1 

3 

2 

37 

15 

4 

4 

48 

33 

1 

$3,022.40 



OUTREACH PROGRAM 

The 1975 town meeting approved $6,000 to partially fund the Outreach pro- 
gram currently being administrated by The Medfield Committee, Inc. The six 
month statistics from the new Outreach worker, Mrs. Isabel Rabe, follows: 

One hundred and thirty-five specific individuals have been in contact 
with the Outreach worker for a total of four hundred and twenty-eight contacts 
(telephone and/or personal visits) during this six month period. Most of the 
individuals involved were in the 16-18 year old group and the problems relat- 
ing to these contacts fell into the following areas (in decreasing order of 
predominance) : 

1. Family Problems 

2. Drug/Alcohol Problems 

3. Vocation Related Problems 

4. School Problems 

5. Crisis Intervention Contacts 

Additionally, in order to familiarize the students with the Outreach pro- 
gram, seven hundred and seventy seven contacts were made during weekly ses- 
sions at the high school. As a result of the above, the Outreach worker made 
contact with groups such as the police, courts, guidance, special service and 
professional social service agencies. 



68 



Plans for the balance of February 1976 include working with the school 
department to provide an in-service training workshop related to drug and 
alcohol, and holding meetings with townspeople, youngsters and school person- 
nel on related problems. Of course the prime purpose of this service contin- 
ues to be aimed at crisis intervention and short term counseling. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Mr. Whelan participated in a discussion on the duties and responsibili- 
ties of the Board of Health with Mr. Bernard J. Shea's social studies class. 

BOARD OF HEALTH MEETINGS 



The Medfield Board of Health normally holds meetings on the first and 
third Mondays of each month at the Town House. These meetings are open to 
the public and citizens are invited to attend. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HichaAd H. Wholan, Chairman 
TkomaA A. CaAagtiano, Clerk 
V/iancjJ) X. CuAAy 
Medfield Board of Health 




Photo by Ann Thompson 

MRS. DAVID F. PERLMUTTER OF MEDVALE NURSING HOME PRESENTS AWARD "MS. MEDVALE 1 
TO 94-YEAR OLD ANNIE CARMICHAEL. SUBSEQUENTLY, SHE WAS AWARDED "MS. MASSA- 
CHUSETTS NURSING HOMES & PRINCESS OF THE QUEEN'S COURT" in the UNITED STATES 



69 



THE NORFOLK COUNTY 
MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Submitted herewith is the report of the Norfolk County Mosquito Control 
Project of its activities in the Town of Medfield for the year ending December 
3l/l975. 

Aerial applied larvicide 

Larvicide by backpack and mistblowers 

Catch basin application for larvicide and adulticide 

Adulticide mistblowing from trucks 

Aerial U. L. V. adulticide application 

Ground U. L. V. adulticide application 

Drainage ditches cleaned 

Brush obstructing drainage cut 

Culverts cleaned and opened 

Recorded calls for information and assistance 

Respectfully submitted 
Superintendent 



1609 


acres 


90 


acres 


1060 




6310 


acres 


1815 


acres 


2560 


acres 


11500 


feet 


775 


feet 


32 




49 





70 



THETREE WARDEN AND 
INSECT PEST CONTROL DIRECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Gypsy Moth population decreased remarkably this year from the previous 
season. Because of this decline, it was not necessary to apply an aerial spray 
and only a little spot spraying with ground equipment. There will be more Gyp- 
sy Moths around this coming season but only of nuisance value with little dam- 
age. We continued our regular control program for Elm Leaf Beetle, Fall Webb 
Worm, Birch Leaf Miner and Poison Ivy. 

Routine pruning of roadside trees consisting of raising low limbs, remov- 
ing deadwood and clearing for visibility was carried on under our Care of Trees 
appropriation. Considerable pruning was undertaken in the cemetery for the 
first time under this appropriation. Our tree planting program continued with 
the planting of several kinds of trees consisting of Pin Oaks, Planetrees, Lo- 
custs, Sweetgum and Flowering Crabs. Many of these were planted within the 
central business district. Our intent is to again have shade in the center of 
town along Main Street. 

We applied the dormant spray to the Elms for the control of the Dutch Elm 
Disease. There were only eighteen trees infected this year but we do not have 
many elms left, particularly large Elms. Several years ago we tried six Elms 
of a disease resistant variety and they have all survived to date. We are 
planning to plant more in the near future. 

One aerial spray instead of the usual two sprays was applied for Mosquito 
Control this past season at the request of the Warrant Committee. This worked 
out well as there were not as many mosquitoes as in previous years and the Nor- 
folk County Mosquito Control tried to give us additional coverage with ground 
equipment. We will be trying this system again this season. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EWU W. Mian, 

Tree Warden 

Insect Pest Control Director 



71 




72 



THE PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The manner in which an individual utilizes his leisure not only reflects 
his own character and happiness but also reflects his value to the community 
in which he is a citizen. 

It is the prime objective of this Commission to foster the wholesome and 
beneficial use of leisure through the expansion of recreational opportunities 
by providing the best programs and facilities for all Medfield residents, 
within fiscal constraints. 

The past year resulted in the rehabilitation of Meeting House (Baker's) 
Pond. It is hoped that this beautif ication of property in the center of town 
will serve as a stimulus for the rest of the downtown area and businesses. 

Many new recreational programs were initiated while some of the existing 
ones were strengthened. Soccer still remains the most popular sport for some 
400 boys and girls participating in Fall and Spring sessions. 

The newly constructed tennis courts at Metacomet Park proved to be ex- 
tremely popular for all age groups and with lights, provided evening recrea- 
tion for additional playing time and maximum utilization of the facility. 

A giant step forward was made in the area of maintenance of park and 
recreation property with the consolidation of groundskeeping duties under a 
program funded by the Federal government. This pilot program allowed the 
Commission to evaluate the worth of having day to day care of our property. 
It is our opinion that such daily care is necessary to protect the Town's 
original investment and it is hoped that the Town will accept this need and 
concept. 

A major problem facing the Commission and the Town is the condition of 
swimming at Hinkley Memorial Park. Your Commission is continuing to try and 
solve the problem of turbidity and without some major work, it is doubtful 
that the Board of Health will allow the opening of the facility in 1976. 

As in all recreational programs much of the success depends on the volun- 
teers who so untiringly give of their time to help make them meaningful. To 
these people the Commission wishes to express their sincere thanks and grati- 
tude. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EnXd W. O'BsU&n, Chairman 

AsutkuA F. McEvoy, Clerk 

AndA&A) Thompson, 3n. 

Gznie. RoboAte 

WUUam J. WqJULvi 

Wclmjw F. Shzjtvid 

BaAbcuia MaLi^ 

RickaAd CcLYVtAdlZ, Co-ordinator 

Park and Recreation Commission 

73 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report for Veterans' Benefits Assistance and Veterans 
Services for the year ending December 31, 1975. 

The following is a breakdown of service and assistance rendered Medfield 
Veterans and their dependents as authorized by the Commissioner of Veterans' 
Services : 

VETERANS' BENEFITS 

This assistance includes food, clothing, fuel and medical expenses for 
Veterans and their dependents which the state reimburses fifty percent to the 
community. 

Application for Ordinary Assistance 31 

Benefits Administered 22 

VETERANS' SERVICES 

This program is designed to orient and educate the veteran with regard 
to Federal and State programs of assistance and direct them toward the insti- 
tutional program. 

Hospitalization 9 

Education 31 

Burial Allowance 14 

Civil Service 14 

Social Security 31 

Pension Assistance 24 

I wish to thank Charlotte Randolph and town officials for their coopera- 
tion and assistance this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul F. CuAAan, 
Veterans' Agent 



74 



THE COUNCIL ON AGING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Medfield Council on Aging has completed another active successful 
year. We have seen several of our areas of major interest come to reality in 
the year 1975. The Wilkins Glen Housing, although an area of controversy at 
times during the year with the MHFA, has seen the occupancy begin for senior 
citizens. With ground breaking ceremonies having taken place on Pound Street, 
construction is well underway for the Town of Medfield' s own Housing for the 
Elderly. These two housing areas will contribute much toward the improvement 
of living conditions for the senior citizens of Medfield. 

The Senior Citizens group has continued to grow in numbers and activities , 
The Senior Citizens have contributed a great deal toward the many Bicentennial 
activities which have taken place in town in 1975. The Council has provided 
entertainment for a number of their meetings and outings, whether held at the 
Community Center or Rocky Woods. We have also furnished buses for a number of 
trips, both social and educational, to keep Medfield' s active Senior Citizens 
"on the go." 

In the area of health, the Council again provided flu shots for all sen- 
ior citizens desiring them with the late Dr. George Gagliani donating his time 
and service to give them. The Visiting Nurses continue to provide a monthly 
clinic for checking blood pressures and providing counseling service on gene- 
ral health matters. 

It has long been a Council on Aging desire to reach ALL senior citizens 
in the town of Medfield, whether they are able to actively participate in all 
the programs or not. In November 1975 this goal was reached with the mailing 
of our first monthly newsletter "HOPE" - Helping Older People Enjoy. This is 
a monthly publication of information, educational news, and a calendar of 
events for the coming month. Our current mailing list has 560 names. As of 
this report we have made three mailings and are already seeing a marked res- 
ponse to all our programs. 

As an added effort to reach all senior citizens, we have employed a sen- 
ior citizen, Mrs. Olga Harrington, under the CETA program, to act as a "Sun- 
shine Visitor." Among her activities are the visiting of senior citizens at 
home, in nursing homes, and in hospitals and assessing the needs of senior 
citizens. The information gained will provide the Council with input neces- 
sary for planning future programs to fulfill the needs of Medfield Senior 
Citizens. 

There was one resignation from the Council during the year which at this 
time has not been filled. Two members were reappointed to continue serving 
on the Council. One member of the Council continues to serve as liaison be- 
tween Council and Park and Recreation Commission and one member serves as a 
liaison between Council and the Medfield Housing Authority. 



75 



We wish to thank all who have contributed in any way to making the year 
one of success for the Council on Aging and the Senior Citizens of Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

VaJiqIvUjOL CoupeA, President 
Madeleine Ha/iding, Vice President 
EHzabeXk Mcuutln, Secretary 
Ldmin FlakeAty, Treasurer 
CkaAleA Doyle, 
klluon UlAlck 
BaAbcuia FeJXeJioll 
Voiotky AnaAtaAA, 
Medfield Council on Aging 



THE BUILDING CODE COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

and Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

The Building Code Committee functions as an advisory Board for the Inspec- 
tor of Buildings on problems that originate with his department. 

Meetings are held when required and not with regularity. 

This Committee recommends that the present Committee continue in name as 
the local or regional building code board of appeals as specified in Section 
126.8 of the State Building Code. 

Also, we recommend that interest in the position be a major qualification 
in the consideration of applicants by the Board of Selectmen. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HlckoliU LaVeAgheXta, Chairman 
Building Code Committee 



76 



THE BUILDING INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

and Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

The following is my annual report for the year ending December 31, 1975, 

I have issued a total of 230 Building Permits (1974 - 239) as listed 
below, and have made a total of 1,350 inspections (1974 - 743) together with 
Rebel Palumbo, Assistant Building Inspector and Richard Ostrander. Thomas 
Sweeney also filled in with assistance with Zoning Enforcing Duties. 

The following is a breakdown of permits issued: 

New Single family dwellings 48 

Additions to private dwellings 39 

Renovations to private dwellings 52 
Multi-family, 60 units 

6 bldgs., plus 1 community building 1 

Renovations to business buildings 10 

Additions to business buildings 2 

New business buildings 3 

Private swimming pools 12 

Private horse stables 1 
Reshingling roofs and installation 

of new sidewalls 38 

Accessory buildings (sheds, cabanas etc.) 8 

Residential garages 1 

Demolitions 3 

Tents (temporary) 8 

Signs 1 

Structures other than buildings 3 

TOTAL PERMITS 230 

Total income from Building permit fees $6,164.21 

(1974 - $5,872.00) 

Total income from inspections for Certifications $3,301.50 
(1974 - 0) 

Total income 1975 $9,465.71 

(1974 - $8,973.71) 

Estimated construction costs on new dwellings $1,810,000.00 
(1974 - $1,604,000.00) 

Estimated construction costs on renovations, $375,044.00 
additions, pools, shingling & sidewalls 
(1974 - $1,393,603.00) 

Renovations & additions on industrial 

(1974 - $50,000.00) 



77 



Renovations and additions on business $57,250.00 

(1974 - $120,300.00) 

New construction on industrial business $179,000.00 

(174 - 0) 

New multi-family building $1,262,717.00 

60 units, 6 buildings and 
1 building for recreation 
(1974 - $1,530,000.00) 

With Chapter 802 of the Acts of 1972 taking effect on January 1, 1975, 
the Building Inspector began to enforce the State Building Code which re- 
quired additional inspection time and incurred more expenses while at the 
same time added more income from fees charged for the issuing of certificates 
and sign applications. 

Additional inspections of schools, churches, rest homes, as well as all 
places of assembly, now are the responsibility of local building inspectors 
(formerly under the jurisdiction of state inspectors). As a result of Town 
Meeting vote on the Zoning By-law, applications for signs in the business 
district also now must be reviewed and inspected by the office of the 
Building Inspector. 

I wish to thank the Town officials, the other department inspectors, the 
administrative secretaries in the Town Hall and Mrs. Mae Otting for the 
assistance and cooperation they have rendered me during this transitional 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HeAbeJti 8. Buaa, 
Inspector of Buildings 



78 



THE ANIMAL INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The following is my report for the year ending December 31, 1975. 

Thirty-four dogs alleged to have bitten or scratched people were quaran- 
tined for a period of ten days. When these animals were checked at the end 
of the quarantine period, none of them showed any evidence of rabies. 

One (1) dog and one (1) squirrel were sent to the Wasserman Laboratory 
for examination for rabies. Neither showed any evidence of rabies. 

Thirty-one (31) stables and paddocks used for shelters for horses, cat- 
tle, sheep, swine, or goats were examined for general cleanliness, sufficient 
water, adequate light, and conformation to Board of Health rules and regula- 
tions. 

For the annual inspection, a total of 80 horses, 15 ponies, 25 cattle, 
30 sheep, 3 goats, 2 swine, and 1 donkey were inspected for and appeared to 
be free from any communicable disease. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ZichaAd A. EUUmnXk, 
Animal Inspector 



THE WIRING INSPECTOR 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report for the year ending December 31, 1975. 

Permits issued 240 

Inspections made 405 

Income from wiring permits $2447.50 

Departmental expenses $3072.56 

At this time I would like to thank the Town House Secretaries and the 
other inspectors for their help and cooperation during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

3o&zph F. EsulUm, J/t. , 
Inspector of Wiring 



79 



THE GAS INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report as Gas Inspector for the year ending 
December 31, 1975. 

Number of permits issued 74 

Total fees collected $687.00 

Number of inspections by Gas Inspector 143 

Number of inspections by Acting Inspector 9 

I wish to thank the Town Secretaries and the other Inspectors for their 
help and cooperation during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

OJcuUzA R. %e 
Gas Inspector 



THE PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

For the period of January 1, 1975 to December 31, 1975 - 

Plumbing permits issued 127 

Plumbing inspections made 270 

Permit fees turned over to Treasurer $2196.00 
Inspections made by Plumbing Inspector 219 

Inspections made by Ass't. Plumbing Inspector 51 

I wish to thank Marie Burke and the office personnel for their help in 
the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ge.ox.ge. E. Nyz, 
Plumbing Inspector 



80 



THE DOG OFFICER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report as Dog Officer for the year ending December 
31, 1975. 

Amount of money assessed in fines $640.00 

Dogs killed by automobiles 16 

Dogs picked by Dog Officer 442 

Court citations given 294 

People required to attend court 6 

People found guilty by District Court 6 

Injured animals attended to 37 

Dogs registered 1975 1059 

Kennels registered 1975 18 

Dogs returned to other towns 42 

At this time I would like to thank the Animal Humane Society of Medfield 
for their generous gift to the Dog Officer of a medical first aid kit, and 
also for their diligent work in finding homes for countless animals given up 
by their owners. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WUJUam J. JmnoJXe., 
Dog Officer 



81 



THE SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The following is my annual report for the year 1975. 

Scales 

Over 10,000 lbs. 

5,000 to 10,000 lbs. 

100 to 5,000 lbs. 

Under 100 lbs. 
Weights 

Avoirdupois 

Apothecary 
Automatic Measures 

Gas Pumps 

Grease Pumps 
Yard Sticks 
Tapes 

Total 

Trial Weighings of Commodities 

Weekly Checking of Unit Prices in Stores 



Sealed 

1 

1 

6 

23 

27 
22 

30 



3 



113 

210 



Expenses 
Salary 

Telephone and Transportation 
Bond 
Supplies 



Receipts 

Sealing Fees 









$225. 


,00 


ion 






80. 
20. 


00 
,00 






Total 




$325. 
$161. 


00 
,50 


Respectfully 


submitted. 


i 



\kioka.2JL W. TammeAo, 

Sealer Weights and Measure* 



82 



DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The work of the Commission, with reference to its primary obligatory 
function of industrial development, was slowed by a recession in the national 
economy, which seemed to have its greatest impact during most of the year 1975. 

In spite of a negative atmosphere for industrial plant expansion, the 
Commission was partly instrumental in bringing about a sale of property, until 
now lying fallow, to a firm whose intention it is soon to develop it into a 
small but productive industrial complex. In addition the Commission was in- 
directly responsible, due to its prompt response to an urgent inquiry for in- 
formation concerning the town, for the signing of a lease by a newly formed 
company with a local plant owner, with the company's ultimate plan being to 
buy property and build a plant of its own, as its business expands. 

During the year the Commission designed and had printed a four page bro- 
chure describing the town and its industrially zoned land, outlining for 
potential developers, the town's intentions for proper growth and development. 
The brochure was distributed to a limited number of corporations and real 
estate concerns, and several encouraging responses were received. Sufficient 
funds remain under the original article so that an additional distribution can 
be made during 1976 with an updated circular. 

In its secondary function - the improvement of the central business dis- 
trict, several forward strides were made. The town voted at the annual town 
meeting to raise and appropriate $6,000. for the construction of a parking 
area to accommodate approximately 35 cars behind the town hall, and this pro- 
ject was promptly completed. As a hoped for consequence, the owner of the 
plant, occupied by Hillcrest Motors, directly adjoining the parking lot, res- 
ponded by bringing about improvements to the building, including painting, 
thus enhancing the general appearance of the entire area. In addition, the 
Town provided the Commission with a total of $12,000. for the development of a 
pedestrian mall in front of the town hall, including the planting of trees, 
shrubs and ground cover. At year end, planning had begun for this area, and 
substantial help had been offered in a preliminary way, by several of the 
other town departments, and the Medfield Garden Club. Work is expected to 
begin in April or May 1976, hopefully for completion prior to Memorial Day. 
(It is noteworthy that three unsuccessful attempts were made by the Commission 
during the year to raise $6,000. in matching funds from the Massachusetts 
Bicentennial Commission before the Warrant Commission recommended at the 
special town meeting last November to vote the entire $12,000. for this pur- 
pose) . 

The Commission met frequently with other town departments for forward 
planning, and also to prevent duplication of effort. In addition, the Commis- 
sion met with potential industrial developers and with landowners to discuss 
future possiblities. Repeated follow-up letters were sent to prospective 
buyers. An on-site inspection of industrial land under some question was made 
with members of the Conservation Commission in order to learn more about the 
quality of the land to be developed. 



83 



The Commission studied the final system plan published by the United 
States Railway Association. A letter was sent to the Association through the 
Board of Selectmen to confirm that the Conrail System would continue to pro- 
vide rail freight service through Medfield junction via the Framingham branch 
and the Dover secondary track, in order to protect the growth and development 
of the industrial area. 

Benjamin P. Astley and Clayton Haigh submitted their resignation to the 
Board of Selectmen which was regretfully recorded by the Industrial Commission. 

The Commission is grateful to the other town departments for their advice 
and support, and to Mrs. Pauline Goucher, Mr. William McCarthy and Mr. Michael 
Sullivan for their valuable assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WoJLtZA M. Tnank, Chairman 

WXJUUum P. \kl\ioJlovuA, Secretary 

Arnold C. Coda 

John 0. EkAViom 

0><LOKa<L M. Gfiakam, J/i. 

Vonaid H. Holding 

T human U/. tinth&vton 

Development and Industrial Commission 



84 



THE HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Historical Commission of the Town of Medfield submits herewith its 
third annual report, covering the calendar year 1975, in which the Commission 
held thirteen meetings, saw two projects completed, continued the listing of 
the town's historic assets, and touched on some new fields of concern. 

It was through the joint efforts of the Commission and the Medfield His- 
torical Society that the following were accomplished: 

1. The Peak House was listed as of September 26, 1975 on the National 
Register of Historic Places maintained by the National Park Service. 
This status was achieved primarily through the action of the Medfield 
Historical Society, owners of the Peak House, in calling upon the pro- 
fessional services of Abbott Lowell Cummings , Director of the Society 
for the Preservation of New England Antiquities, and an outstanding 
authority on early New England architecture. After two visits to the 
Peak House in 1974, Mr. Cummings gave his written opinion that the 
house, with the exception of the cellar, was definitely 17th century; 
and that such replacements as were necessary in the 1924 restoration 
were most carefully done under the expert supervision of the late 
William Sumner Appleton, then corresponding Secretary of the Society 
for the Preservation of New England Antiquities. 

Reinforcement of Mr. Cummings' opinion on the 17th century origin 
of the Peak House appeared in the title search conducted by Donald J. 
MacDonald and Laura H. Smith of the Historical Commission. Investiga- 
tion of town, county, and state records showed definitely that Benja- 
min Clark was one of the Medfield residents who finally in 1680 re- 
ceived from the General Court abatement of their "rates" (i.e., taxes) 
in consideration of the reduction of their houses "to sad ruinous 
heapes" by King Philip's Indians in 1676. 

An important contribution to the attainment of National Register sta- 
tus for the Peak House was the photographs taken by Barbara Leighton 
of the Historical Society, especially the interior views showing the 
17th century elements of the construction, and thus supplementing 
Mr. Cummings' written statement. The real start of investigation in- 
to the probable age of the Peak House was the booklet written by Mar- 
jorie Meaney, and published by the Historical Society in 1969. Basic 
to the success of this application, as well as that for the First 
Parish Meeting House (April 18, 1974) was the work on the inventory 
of Medfield' s historic assets. This work was started by the Histori- 
cal Society, and carried on since 1972 by Eleanor Anes and Ann Mentzer 
of the Historical Commission, aided by Carol Hilton and others of the 
Historical Society. 

2. The second joint success of the Commission and the Society was the re- 
publication of William S. Tilden's History of Medfield, Massachusetts 
(1650-1886) , originally printed in 1887 by the George Ellis Co-, of 
Boston. The book was reproduced in its entirety by offset, a modern 
photographic process, at the plant in Ann Arbor, Michigan, of the 



85 




Photo by Edward Carreiro 
PEAK HOUSE ON NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES 



86 



Edwards Brothers, specialists in reprints. A short new preface to 
the 1975 edition gives an account of Mr. Tilden's life, and of the 
difficulties attending the original publication. 

The Historical Commission sought proposals for the reprinting, started 
the solicitation of prepaid subscriptions, and inserted in the warrant 
for the April Town Meeting an article which was passed by the voters, 
advancing $1500 as a loan to facilitate the reprinting, conditional 
upon the raising of an equal amount by the Historical Society from 
other sources. As of December 31, 1975, it is possible that sales 
of the History of Medfield, Massachusetts (1650-1886 ) which arrived 
in Medfield on December 23, will be sufficient to make the proposed 
loan unnecessary. 

Historical Inventory work has continued in 1975, (as mentioned under the Peak 
House heading above) , with emphasis directed toward the area on Main Street 
east of the centre of town. 

New fields of interest for the Historical Commission in 1975 were as follows: 

1. Cemetery - possible identification of stones connected with inscrip- 
tions that are listed in a book compiled in 1899 by several members 
of the Historical Society. Mr. Joseph Roberts has given the Histori- 
cal Commission a plan of the old section of the cemetery, with each 
plot numbered. However, the lists stating the ownership of each lot 
and the names of those buried therein were lost in the Town House fire 
of 1923. When weather permits, a start can be made on a file coordi- 
nating lot numbers and epitaphs, as suggested by Robert Luke of the 
Historical Commission. As our cemetery was laid out in 1651, and has 
always been the only burying ground in the town, a great deal of early 
history can be read on its stones, many of which need preservative 
measures. 

2. Indian artifacts - possibly buried along the routes of the sewer inter- 
ceptors projected for 1976 as part of the Sewer Improvement. State 
law requires that the State Archeologist must approve construction in 
areas where Indian artifacts are likely to be found. Since the pro- 
posed interceptors follow in general the course of streams where Indi- 
an relics are apt to be buried, and in the case of Medfield have been 
found, the Historical Commission is keeping in touch regarding this 
matter with the State Archeologist, the Selectmen, and Town Counsel. 

Our thanks to several good friends in the Town House, especially Pauline 
Goucher, and Charlotte Randolph for assistance or suggestions regarding our 
work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

laxxMjd H. Smoth, Chairman 
VonaJtd J. MacVonatd, Vice-chairman 
Elzanoi knQJ>, Secretary 
RobQAZ H. Lukz, J/l. , Financial Secy.* 
Arme MuntzeA 
Roy A. McQuMan 
Vavld L. Wilmcvutk 

WMMxm E. McCa/itky, Associate Member 
WilLLam F. McCcuUky, Associate Member 
Resigned Historical Commission 

87 



325th ANNIVERSARY AND 
SPECIAL BICENTENNIAL COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

and Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

Your Anniversary Committee has continued to meet at least bi-monthly, but 
as 1975 "Sounded the Gun" for starting events, sub-committees have and are 
meeting bi and tri-weekly. 

1975 also brought the final state approval of the 325th Anniversary and 
Bicentennial Corporation, a non-profit corporation, the members of the corpo- 
ration being the same as those of the town committee. 

Funds voted at town meeting thus far are committed to the purchase and 
sale of commemorative items at your Bicentennial store; specifically, commemo- 
rative coins, pewter soldiers in the Putnam Greys uniform, Staffordshire chi- 
na, and Medfield Reflections , the forthcoming pictorial history of our town, 
town beautification and the Bicentennial parade. 

The State Bureau of Accounts had ruled that the income from town raised 
funds must revert directly back to the town free cash account. This meant, 
therefore, that the funding of various events would not be possible. The 
funding of on-going events to celebrate our nation's Bicentennial and Med- 
field' s 325th Anniversary meant, therefore, the formation of a non-profit 
corporation. 

Thanks to the generosity of Attorney Ralph Good, committee member and 
legal advisor, the proper recording forms were purchased. The initial cash 
deposit of $15.00 was received through the generous donation of the Unitarian 
Women's Alliance. 

The Bicentennial year opened on April 19, with the tolling of church 
bells, the raising of your town bicentennial flag, reactivation of Medfield' s 
Militia by proclamation of the Selectmen, marching of Militia through town, 
including appropriate ceremonies at the Cemetery, Town Hall and the Peak House, 

Police officer Robert Naughton aided and advised a corporate committee in 
the execution of a Lumberjack Contest and thanks to many of our fellow towns- 
people and organizations, such as Tom Seeley and the Sportsmen's Club, the 
day was a complete success. Advance sale tickets had not sold well, but 
thanks to excellent weather and participants (two of which are World Champion 
Lumberjacks), a profit was realized. Proceeds were utilized to pay outstand- 
ing invoices and provided the necessary funding of the next corporate event - 
the Flea Market. 

Mr. Donald "Dutch" Bickel and Mrs. John Edgar chaired the Flea Market and, 
because of their efforts, a successful day was realized, which again paid the 
bills. The Flea Market Committee is particularly grateful to the Corning Com- 
pany for the use of their parking lot which was used for the event. 

The Senior Citizens Committee, coordinated by Mrs. Robert Coulter, pre- 
pared and served food at both the Lumberjack Contest and Flea Market. The 
proceeds of these sales are being held in escrow by the Corporation for our 

88 




Photo by Edward Carreiro 



FLEA MARKET 
89 




\ — 



Photo by Edward Carreiro 



WEDDING 



90 










Photo by Edward Carreiro 



ICENTENNIAL HOUSE TOUR 
91 



Senior Citizens to finance and donate a permanent gift to our town. The 
Bicentennial Committee wishes to express our thanks to our Senior Citizens 
for all of the thousands of hours that they have donated to our town in nume- 
rous ways. 

"Chenery Commemorative Corner," your Bicentennial store, opened on Novem- 
ber 15, 1975, co-chaired by Mrs. William Hallowell and Mrs. Richard Whelan. 
The commemorative store thus far has been an overwhelming success, returning 
to our town a profit on the money expended by the town on the articles sold 
in the store. It will continue to be open through 1976, with additions of 
new items periodically. 

The Home Tour and Period Wedding, coordinated by Mrs. Michael Cronin and 
chaired by Mrs. Mary Flynn and Mrs. Joan Orlando, again was a complete suc- 
cess. Special thanks should be given to the "New ' N Town" Club for the dona- 
tion of the Champagne Breakfast that preceded the home tour. Home owners of 
the houses on tour received as a special small thanks, date plaques, purchased 
by the corporation. The wedding cake, used for the period wedding, was dona- 
ted to the residents of the Med-Vale Nursing Home by "Pastor" David Daniels, 
"Bride" Jeanne Nightengale, and "Groom" Kevin Lyall. 

The 325th Anniversary & Special Bicentennial Committee has been dili- 
gently working and striving to assure that our town has, is, and will be 
holding a proper and befitting birthday of our town and nation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WWULam L. HallowolZ, Chairman 

VojuJUlvkl CouJUqa 

RoboM. ConttzA 

Banbaxja CKonin 

Edwcuid VohoAty 

Rob&it E. Voolzy 

Ralph C. Good, In.. 

PauLLne. M. GouchoA 

BavzAly L. HoJULomqM 

Vonotky Kane. 

ShJJiZay Maples 

EdwaAd Otting 

PoVlIcJjl Ryioax 

Michael. TammeJio 

MaAie, M. BuAke., Associate Member 

JoAtph L. MaACsLoneXtH, Honorary Chairman 

Special Bicentennial and 

325th Anniversary Committee 



92 



THE TRICOUNTY REGIONAL 
VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Although we have been engaged in many and varied activities throughout 
the year 1975, probably the most significant activity has been that of facili- 
ties and program planning. At times the job has seemed insurmountable, but 
in the final analysis accomplishments have been most satisfying. Our archi- 
tect, Day & Zimmermann Associates, has been most efficient in providing a 
building design that meets the criteria that we had set forth. Our educational 
specifications have been prepared and approved by the appropriate state agen- 
cies and interior layout and equipment needs have been determined. The Massa- 
chusetts Board of Education has approved our project assuring sixty-five per- 
cent reimbursement on all construction and initial equipment costs. Site work 
has been completed, the General Contract has been awarded, foundation has been 
poured, and steel is being erected. 

Other less visible activities, but equally important, has been the plan- 
ning of programs and the manner in which programs will be provided. In an 
effort to asure the best programs to the most children at the least cost, we 
have spent considerable time investigating various alternatives. Other pro- 
cedural matters such as admissions practices and conformance with special 
needs and equal opportunity laws have been planned. Curriculum development 
including basic philosophy, goals and objectives, content guides and time 
frames have been of great concern. And not to be overlooked is planning for 
staff. This committee obviously recognizes the necessity to establish meaning- 
ful programs in a functional structure, but more importantly we recognize that 
it will be the responsibility of people to stimulate the learning process. 
Specific positions with well-defined roles are considered critical to our total 
plans. 

Between January and September, the Tri-County Project had been financed 
by $1.5 million in bond anticipation notes acquired in three equal install- 
ments. On September 24, this committee approved a nineteen-year bond issue 
sale of $8.5 million. The low bid was offered by the Shawmut Bank of Boston 
and Associates at a rate of 7 ..5%. Another issue of the remaining $6.5 million 
is scheduled for July, 1976. 

On May 28, the site preparation contract was awarded to C. Pezza & Son, 
Inc. of Johnston, Rhode Island. There were eleven bidders and the low bid as 
awarded was for $526,048.00. Our 62-acre site in Franklin, close to the inter- 
section of Route 140 and 1-495, was cleared and official groundbreaking was 
held on the morning of July 12. General Contract bids were opened on August 
20th and awarded to the low bidder, Northgate Construction, Inc. of Waltham, 
Mass. on September 9th. There were eleven bidders, bids were very competitive 
and low was $10,288,293.00. 

Such progress has not been a result of the labor of some few people. We 
have been fortunate to have had the assistance of a great number of district 
residents who have unselfishly given of their time and talent as advisory com- 
mittee members. Participants from the Town of Medfield and their area of ex- 
pertise are as follows: Kenneth Childs, Drafting; Clyde 0. Deering, Electri- 
city/Electronics; Moyna H. Geller, Child Care, Health Services & Home Economics: 

93 



William O'Donnell, Graphic Arts and John E. Sprague, Commercial Arts. 

Dr. Bruce Pulsifer, Superintendent of Medfield Public Schools, has con- 
tinued to actively participate in the development of Tri-County. With his 
support and that of advisory committees and town officials, we will remain 
on schedule and will be fully prepared to provide meaningful educational 
opportunities in September, 1977. 

Respectfully submitted, 



AnXhuA C. HULlman, Chairman 

Vfi. Jame-5 A. Sprout, J/i. Medfield 



THE MEDFIELD-NORWOOD MENTAL HEALTH 
AND RETARDATION AREA BOARD 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Medf ield-Norwood Area Board for Mental Health and Mental Retardation 
of the Department of Mental Health consists of 21 citizens appointed by the 
Governor to act as representatives of their communities in issues regarding 
the comprehensive delivery of mental health and retardation services. 

The Area Board representative (s) from Medfield for 1975-1976 are: 

Anthony Chiodi P.O. Box 276 359-4312 

Dr. Norine Johnson 55 Sawmill Lane 359-4065 
Margaret Vasaturo 1 Emerson Road 359-4320 

For questions or suggestions regarding mental health and retardation 
services, call your Area Board representative or the Area Office at 359-4312, 
or 326-4741. 

Respectfully submitted, 

The Medf ield-Norwood Mental Health 
and Retardation Area Board 



94 



JURY LIST 1975 



Paul F. Alvarado 
John H. Armacost 
John A. Auld 
Ralph A. Baker, Jr. 
Sandra Lee Buchanan 
Mary D. Burks 

Donald L. Bush 
Glenn R. Clancy 
William S. Cleary 
Phyllis P. Cohen 

Isaac M. Colbert 
David F. Cook 
James R. Coolman 
Karolyn Davey 
Nelson A. Davis 
Arlene E. Dinsmore 
Edward J. Dornig 
Clifford G. Doucette 
Mae A. Emery 
Walter B. Eppich 
Rolin C. Fahrenkrog 
Ann E. Ferguson 

Stanley C. Fisher 
Priscilla Cook Flynn 
Eugene T. Gallagher 

Cheryl A. Grover 
Linda M. Grover 
David R. Guenette 
Fred A. Hallock 
Vincent D. Hallowell 
John T. Hansen 
Muriel F. Harris 

Patrick S. Harris 

Carol A. Hilpert 

Paul E. Hinkley 
Peter S. Hinkley 
Raymond 0. Hollis 
Albert J. Houde 
Ann Lee Howell 

Edith C. Howlett 



Gregory S. Hurd 



2 Evergreen Way 
16 Penobscot St. 

25 Charlesdale Rd. 
36 Frairy St. 

63 Pleasant St. 
39 Vinald Rd. 

12 Carmen Circle 

45 Elm St. 

91 Pleasant St. 

7 Country Way 

5 Rocky Lane 
78 Adams St. 
19 Emerson Rd. 
5 Bartlett Ave. 

26 Marlyn Rd. 

I Maplewood Rd. 
44 Spring St. 
71 Pleasant St. 
49 Cypress St. 
9 Cross St. 

99 Granite St. 

II Woodfall Rd. 

19 Philip St. 
16 Knollwood Rd. 
5 Oxbow St. 

25 Frairy St. 

89 Pleasant St. 

28 Cross St. 

4 Elm St. 

149 South St. 

34 Blacksmith Drive 

11 Partridge Rd. 

198 Causeway St. 

1 Tamarack Rd. 

106 Harding St. 

8 Pheasant Rd. 

67 Blacksmith Drive 

21 Lee Rd. 

22 Arnold Drive 

23 Pleasant St. 



Regional Program Director 

District Sales Manager 

Fleet Service Manager 

Machine Operator 

Store Manager 

Housewife; 

Husband: Technician 

Asst. Dept . Manager 

Programmer 

Chauffeur 

Housewife ; 

Husband: Sales Engineer 

Asst. Prof, of Psychology 

Carpenter 

Dist. Sales Manager 

Keypunch Operator 

Sales Engineer 

Secretary 

Field Auditor/Agent 

Foreman 

Sales Clerk 

Service Man 

Operations V.P. 

Housewife ; 

Husband: Area Manager 

Welder 

Secretary 

Manager, Systems & Data 

Processing 

Assembler 

Assembler 

Student 

Project Engineer 

School Custodian 

District Manager 

Housewife ; 

Husband: Reg. Supervisor 

Consultant - Electronics 

Engineer 

Housewife; 

Husband: Group Director 

Driver 

Steam Fireman 

Manager 

Supt. of Engineering 

Housewife ; 

Husband: Teacher & Writer 

Housewife; 

Husband: 

Manager 

Teacher 



Asst. Personnel 



95 



Leona R. Hurd 

Donald C. Johnson 
Charles H. Justice 
Ruth M. Justice 
Joseph M. Keefe 
Stephen D. Kristof 
Stephen Logsdon 
Francis A. Logue 
Arthur L. Lomker 
Bruce G. Macleod 
Robert F. Maples 
Benjamin A. Martin 
Richard Mastronardi 
David A. McGinnis 
Richard L. Middlesworth 
Garth S. Moss 
Margaret A. Munger 
Robert T. Norton 
Muriel C. Palumbo 



Joseph R. Parker, Jr. 
Harold E. Plough 
Jack E. Reed 
Toby J.E. Reed 
Hanson C. Robbins 
Florence E. Roberts 

Ronald Robertson 
Robert E. Ryall 
James A. Ryan 

Jeanne Savage 

Louise A. Sears 
George M. Sherman, Jr, 
Earle C. Smith 
Jean T. Swaim 



Thomas V. Sweeney 
Horace M. Thayer 
Robert T. Toubeau 
Ronald 0. Vartabedian 
Sandra L. Wallace 
Annamae Ward 

Mary M. Welch 
Joan M. White 
Arthur E. Wills 



3 Westview Rd. 

27 Pound St. 
215 South St. 
215 South St. 
10 Arnold Drive 

23 Belknap Rd. 

24 Emerson Rd. 
348 South St. 

14 Stoneybrook Rd. 
322 Main St. 
3 Camelot Lane 
12 Pine Grove Rd. 
12 Green St. 

28 Philip St. 
41 Colonial Rd. 
21 Hilltop Circle 
1 Steven Lane 

24 Charlesdale Rd, 
17 West St. 



8 Metacomet St. 
28 Snyder Rd. 
17 South St. 

64 Green St. 

72 Elm St. 

15 Miller Street 

5 Carmen Circle 

6 Wildewood Drive 
15 Lantern Lane 

9 Evergreen Way 

68 Philip St. 

7 Pleasant Court 
86 Adams St. 

66 Foundry St. 



78 Harding St. 
35 West Mill St. 
52 Brook St. 
31 Vinald Rd. 
91 Pleasant St. 
8 Haven Rd. 

115 High St. 

16 Flintlocke Lane 

56 Philip St. 



Housewife ; 

Husband: Chief Engineer 

Owner - Service Station 

Regional Representative 

Library Aide P.T. 

Paymaster 

Golf Course Superintendent 

Program Manager 

Insurance Claim Supervisor 

Analyst 

Engineering Clerk 

Marketing Manager 

Sales Representative 

Engineer 

President - Machine Shop 

Manager-Owner 

Broadcast Engineer 

Housewife, Artist 

Pressroom Supervisor 

Housewife ; 

Husband: Owner - VET 

Package Store 

Silversmith, Self Employed 

Sr. Systems Engineer 

District Manager 

Statistician 

Investment Banker 

Housewife; 

Husband: Funeral Director 

Manager, Personnel 

Agent 

Coordinating Marketing to 

Manufacturers 

Housewife; 

Husband: Sales Manager 

Office Worker 

Hersey Products 

Mason-Plasterer-Foreman 

Housewife; 

Husband: Self-Employed, 

Insurance Broker 

Retired 

Maintenance Supervisor 

Utility Sander 

Letter Carrier P.T. 

Licensing & Order Clerk 

Housewife; 

Husband: Accountant Treas 

Secretary 

Manager 

Self Employed 



96 



PUBLIC SCHOOL 
REPORTS 






FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1975 



97 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



The 1975 year has seen the recently elected Mr. David Hansen resign his 
post because of moving from town. We appreciate Mr. Hansen's valuable service 
to your School Committee. We have welcomed Mr. I. Jerome O'Connor who was 
appointed in November, and has been an able addition to our Committee. 

This year has- been gratifying to us in that we have had a great increase 
in citizen attendance at our meetings. Their interest is encouraging, their 
questions and opinions are welcome, and their presence has influenced our 
deliberations . 

Much of our time this year has been spent responding to groups in our 
community, many of whom had strong feelings about School Committee decisions 
made as a result of the $100,000 cut in our 1975-76 school budget request. As 
expressed at the 1975 Town Meeting, we have been re-examining priorities with 
an end to keeping our 1976-77 budget at no more than a 5% increase over last 
year's request. 

Our continuing emphasis on development of fundamental skills has led to 
changes in the English curriculum under the direction of Mr. Charles Sullivan, 
recently hired English Coordinator. Specifically, increased attention to 
basic skill development, proposed requirements in High School English to 
ensure that students are exposed to grammar and composition, literature, and 
public speaking, as well as a move toward Honor English, have been developed. 
We have also undertaken an examination of our entire testing program to aid 
us in a more accurate evaluation of our total program. 

This Fall the school survey was developed to allow us to assess the 
opinions of Medfield citizens as to your feelings about the quality of the 
existing educational system and the direction you favor for the future. The 
survey points out areas where the schools must provide the public with infor- 
mation about our programs, as well as providing feedback for us in making 
policy decisions. 

Our continued gratitude goes to the many citizens who have serviced the 
school children as volunteers, as well as the Town departments, such as 
Highway, Police and Park and Recreation, for their support and cooperation. 
We must also thank our own staff who, in its many capacities, has shown the 
dedication which enables us to provide sound education for our children. 

Dawn 7. Alls tin, CkcuAman 
John C. Ru&uiLt, J/l. , Vice. ChcuAman 
Thomcu, McMuA&iie., Ro.con.dU.ng ShcaoXxxalj 
7. JoAomc O'Connor, Jn. , 

VlnancAjxl SacAnWty 
Pkitip J. 8uaa 



98 




School Committee Members (standing) Philip Burr, Thomas McMurtrie, I. Jerome 
O'Connor, (seated) John Rudisill, Jr., and Dawn Austin. 



REPORT OF THE 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the Chairman and Members of the School Committee: 

I have the privilege of submitting my fourth annual report which is the 
twenty-fourth in a series of annual reports of the Superintendent of Schools 
in Medfield. 



99 



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109 



SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM 



Avery, Dorothy E. 


Director 




Hallett, Elaine C. 


Secretary 




Boulter, Jean L. 


Dale Street 




Catenacci, Rita 


Memorial 




Coffone, Nancy M. 


High School 




Collins, Marsha A. 


Junior High 




Dick, Doris R. 


Junior High 




Flynn, Janet M. 


Junior High 


(Mgr.) 


Ganley, Phyllis A. 


Dale Street 




Grover, Mildred H. 


Dale Street 


(Mgr.) 


Horgan, Mary E. 


Wheelock 


(Mgr.) 


Howard, Ruth D. 


Junior High 




Hutt, Mary Rita A. 


High School 




Ingraham, Dorothy M. 


Wheelock 




Leslie, Patricia E. 


Dale Street 




O'Donnell, Lenora M. 


Dale Street 




Oglesby, Loretta A. 


High School 




Petersen, Leonora M. 


Wheelock 




Sloan, Marjorie 


Memorial 


(Mgr.) 


Smith, Jean M. 


Junior High 




Stewart, Alice L. 


High School 


(Mgr.) 


Szylkonis, Irene F. 


Junior High 




Thayer, E. Ruth 


Memorial 




Wenz, Shirley A. 


High School 





CUSTODIANS 



Pritoni, Harold F. 


Director of Buildings and Ground: 


Boudreau, Joseph I. 


Groundskeeper 


Boudreau, William F. 


Wheelock 


Bridges, Frank W. 


Dale Street 


Brock, James W. 


Maintenance 


Capocci, William L. 


Dale Street 


DiNardo, John 


Groundskeeper 


Giard, Arnold U. 


Junior High 


Grover , John T. 


Maintenance 


Hallowell, Vincent D, 


Wheelock 


Hennahane, Michael V, 


High School 


Kilmer, Howard L. 


High School 


LaPlante, Thomas M. 


Junior High 


McCormack, John D. 


Memorial 


Motes, Carlis E. 


Dale Street 


Mott, Harold S. 


Memorial 



110 



Suereth, Eric T. 
Sweet, Reginald 

T irnme rman , Joseph W. 
Walls, Thomas R. 



Groundskeeper 
Junior High 
High School 
Wheelock 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



New Personnel 



Appointment Effective 



SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



Bolesky, Edward M. 
Fletcher, Frances 
Knowles, M. Jewel 
Norwell, Dorothy 
Staruk, Paul J. 
Sullivan, Charles 



September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
September 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



Ekstrom, John 
Hoffman, Janice 
Horgan, Mary Sue 
Ide, G. Douglas 
McVicar, Cornelia 



September 

September 

September 

October 

September 



DALE STREET 



Gottfried, Laurel 
Plough, Judith 

Supple, Elizabeth 



September 
September 
September 



WHEELOCK 



Bolger, Margaret 
Cameron, Gail 
Colley, Edward M. 
Kristof, Ann 

Leigh, Iris 



September 

February 

September 

September 

September 



111 



MEMORIAL 



Eckert, Nanette 
Sullivan, Virginia 



September 
September 



SPECIAL SERVICES 



Wood , Joan 



September 



CUSTODIANS 



Brock, James W. 
Hennahane, Michael V. 



March 
May 



TERMINATIONS 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



Dugger, Rozann 
Georgian, James 
Jackson, Ann 
Lockhart, Louise 
Riley, Joan 
Ruggiero, George 
Timrud, Carol 



June 
July 
March 
June 
June 
June 
August 



DALE STREET 



Rose, Daniel 



June 



WHEELOCK 



U8han, Jessica 



June 



GUIDANCE 



McGue, Judith 



August 



112 



SPECIAL SERVICES 



Dwyer, Margaret 
Harding, Madeleine 
Ribak, Sidney 



July 
July 
June 



LEAVES OF ABSENCE 



Guenette, Claire (Sabbatical) 
Reinemann, Richard 
Viera, Robert 



June 
June 
June 



CUSTODIANS 



Belcher, Blair 
Chevare, Paul 



February 
April 



ENROLLMENT COMMENTARY 



The review of enrollments during the past ten years (see below) suggests 
that some modest decreases in student enrollment are likely during the next 
three to five years. As noted last year, the number of teaching stations 
(classrooms) throughout the school system does appear to school authorities 
to be adequate. 

All schools are operating at maximum utilization of classroom and support 
spaces. In the primary grades the declining enrollments are providing needed 
spaces for music, art, and small group instruction rooms which have been very 
scarce in recent years. Enrollments will continue for at least another year 
in the mid 700' s and the mid 600' s at the junior and senior high schools, 
respectively. 

With the opening of the Tri-County Regional Vocational-Technical School 
in the fall of 1977, enrollments will begin a three to four year decrease to 
the mid to low 600 's at the junior high school and to the upper to mid 500' s 
at the senior high school. These projections are based upon current home 
building rates in Medfield . As noted in the 1974 report, the senior high 
school continues to need expanded and improved facilities. These are 
especially needed for science laboratories, the instructional materials center 
(library), guidance and health, offices, and athletic facilities. 

Tables and commentary on Medfield Public School enrollments follow: 



113 



Table I: Ten Year Comparison of Enrollments, October 1 
66-67 67-68 68-69 69-70 70-71 71-72 72-73 73-74 74-75 75-76 



SPED 


9 


(10) 


10 


12 


14 


16 


12 


11 


17 


13 


Kg. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


181 


183 


187 


1 


227 


228 


243 


235 


229 


247 


221 


203 


201 


185 


2 


200 


228 


227 


235 


220 


223 


240 


212 


205 


192 


3 


187 


210 


249 


233 


233 


232 


224 


218 


218 


211 


4 


211 


195 


225 


259 


235 


238 


246 


209 


215 


212 


5 


183 


209 


204 


237 


248 


236 


249 


251 


210 


221 


6 


182 


193 


219 


222 


236 


253 


237 


247 


253 


225 


7 


173 


189 


197 


228 


227 


244 


251 


230 


250 


255 


8 


157 


179 


188 


210 


234 


236 


248 


242 


227 


250 


9 


146 


165 


178 


194 


209 


240 


235 


233 


235 


219 



10 111 145 160 177 201 207 232 231 220 230 

11 115 115 148 172 165 193 203 221 227 212 

12 88 113 116 155 169 149 183 188 207 215 

Totals 1989 2179 2364 2569 2620 2714 2781 2877 2868 2827 
Comments on the 1975-76 column above: 

1. The incoming first grade class for 1975-76 was 22 students 
smaller than the outgoing graduating class of the previous 
year 1974-75. 

2. The kindergarten program in its third year enrolled 187 
pupils compared with 183 and 181 in previous years. First 
Grade ^increased by only 2 pupils over the kindergarten enrollment 
of last year, vs. a 20 pupil increase the year before. Thus a 
higher percentage of all eligible students are attending 
kindergarten. 

3. The total number of pupils in grades 1-11 in 1974-75 decreased 
by 19 as they became grades 2-12 in 1975-76. This is an 
average loss of 1.7 students at each grade level, or 0.7% 
decrease. The net of in and out migration, while still negative, 
was not as severe as last year's 30 pupil loss, 2.7 students per 
grade, and 1.2% decrease. 

4. The over-all enrollment in 1975-76 decreased by 41 students or 
1.43% vs. last year's 9 students and 0.31%. 



114 



Table II: Comparison of Enrollments 



Year to Year 

66-67 to 67-68 
67-68 to 68-69 
68-69 to 69-70 
69-70 to 70-71 
70-71 tO 71-72 
71-72 to 72-73 
72-73 to 73-74 

73-74 to 74-75 
74-75 to 75-76 



Comparing Grades 
2-12 with 1-11 
in Pieceding Year 

49 
55 
84 
-25 
14 
-1 
-104 

-30 
-19 



Comparing Grade 1 

with Preceding 
Graduating Class 



Comparing 

Total 

Enrollments 



140 190 

130 185 

119 205 

74 51 

78 94 

72 67 

20 -85 (plus Kg 
of 181 for a net of +96) 

13 -9 

-22 -41 



Comments on above: 

1. During the years 66-67 to 69-70 more students were transferring to 
Medfield than were leaving. During the years 69-70 to 72-73 the 
gains and losses due to transferring students were about even. From 
72-73 to 73-74 a sharp reversal occurred as fewer students trans- 
ferred to Medfield than those who left. From 73-74 to 75-76 this 
loss continued but at a significantly lower rate. Continual net 
losses of this type would not seem logical to assume, with 50-60 new 
homes per year and some leveling of average family size in Medfield 
eventually. 

2. The actual number of first graders during the past eight years has 
been consistently in the 220 f s to 240's, but since 1973-74 through 
1975-76 the figure has dropped to under 200. Meanwhile, the size 
of the Senior class has been increasing from 88 to 207. Together 
these factors have meant increases at a decreasing rate and finally 
a reversal, an actual decrease, in 1975-76. 

a. The incoming first grade classes were 130 pupils larger than 
the preceding year's Senior class from 66-67 to 69-70. 

b. Incoming first grade classes were 75 pupils larger from 69-70 
to 72-73. 

c. From 72-73 to 74-75 another significant decrease in the rate 
of enrollment increase occurred as only 17 more entered first 
grade than were in the previous Senior class. 

d. Finally, this year 22 fewer pupils entered first grade than were 
in the previous class, and this type of loss can be expected to 
repeat in the near future as well. 

3. The trends in both 1. and 2. above have been to reduce the rate of 
increase during the past nine years. A decrease in enrollment 
occurred in 1973-74 of 85 students - although it was blurred by the 
addition of 181 Kindergarten pupils. In 1974-75 an actual decrease 
of 9 students established the first decrease in enrollment in 
recent history, followed in 1975-76 by a decrease of 41 students. 



115 



Analysis and Projections 

Because of the drop in the birth rate it is likely the incoming 
first grade classes for the next two to four years will be 
smaller than during the six year period from 1966-67 to 1972-73. 
This will likely be the case even if the town continues to add 
40 to 60 new homes a year which has been its present rate of 
growth. Thus, some decrease can be foreseen at this important 
entry level to our school system. 

If first grade enrollments do^ hold steady at 180-190 they will be 
less than the graduating classes in the next four years by 
approximately 30-40 pupils, causing a decreasing effect on total 
enrollment by that amount. 

It would appear that any increases in the student body, grades 2 
through 12, have been caused by new home construction. During the 
course of the past eight years, enrollments would have decreased in 
grades 2 through 12 IN EVERY INSTANCE but for new home construction. 
The enrollment loss this year of 19 suggests this out-transferring 
loss pattern still continues, but at a considerably less significant 
level. 

Thus, we can expect slight decreases in the total kindergarten 
through grade 12 student enrollment over the next two to four years. 
A careful watch must be made on out- and in-transferring students for 
the grades 2 to 12 group. This prime factor reflects the relative 
size of incoming and outgoing families, which in turn is a result 
of many economic and social influences. It also is based upon the 
current level of 40 to 60 new homes per year. As the economy 
"heats up" more new homes and apartments may be built than the 40-60, 
thus reversing the 2-12 decreasing pattern. No total increases can 
occur, though, until the smaller first grade classes are also offset. 

During the past four years comparisons of grades 2-12 with preceding 
year's 1-11 reveal that grades 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 generally increase 
their membership by 1-2 pupils per grade year to year, but grades 8, 
9, 10, 11, and 12 have been suffering reductions of 4-5 pupils per 
grade plus the "normal" attrition of about 10 students at grade 12. 
Grade 2 has also experienced consistent losses of about 4-5 pupils 
due in large part to non-promotion of some first graders each year. 
These trends have sharpened significantly in 1975-76. 

By projecting these figures for 1976-77, we may expect an overall 
pupil enrollment reduction of approximately forty to sixty. Sixty 
to Seventy percent of the decrease will be at grades K-3. 



4. The present grades five through eleven are our largest classes. The 
Junior High School is large enough to handle these classes satis- 
factorily. The Senior High is cramped. Enrollments, based upon 
these class sizes, appear likely to approach 690 pupils from 1977-78 
through 1980-81. 



116 



Fortunately, the new vocational technical school will open in 
September 1977 at grades 9 and 10 and can accept 78 Medfield pupils. 
In 1978, grades 9, 10, and 11 can handle 117 pupils. In 1979 and 
beyond the quota will be 156 pupils. Thus, the worst of the enroll- 
ment pressures will thus be lessened, with the effect that grades 
10, 11, and 12 will likely peak at about 660 pupils throughout 
1975-1978 and then taper down to 575 pupils from 1978-1981. 

As noted above, teaching stations will be sufficient in quantity for 
these numbers. But the quality of these classrooms in specialized 
areas needs improvement. Of equal import, support areas for this 
many pupils as well as continually improving program needs require 
expansion and improvement. 

5. Enrollment projections - The above review of the enrollments during 

the past ten years clearly suggests that further decreases in 
student enrollments at a level of 30-50 pupils/year are likely in the 

near future. If construction should increase to the 100 family 

units a. year level , then enrollments would again be on the rise at all 

grade levels. Economic conditions are improving and merit close 
surveillance over the next 2-5 years. 



SPECIAL FUNDING 

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, Public Law 89-10, 
Title I funded $13,000 to a summer school program held at the Dale Street 
School involving primarily from the Memorial and Dale Street Schools, plus a 
few from Wheelock School. The growing Federal emphasis in these programs is 
to provide relatively large sums of money for relatively few children in order 
to make significant educational gains for those in need - especially at the 
pre-school and primary grade levels. Children in Grades 1 through 5 were 
served by this project. The Wheelock attendance area as a whole was again 
ruled ineligible as a primary target group, and this will likely be the case 
in the future. 

A small Title I Year-round program has been funded using volunteer 
mothers as tutors at two of our elementary schools. $700 in Federal funds 
have been used to purchase materials to meet the instructional needs of 
students. 

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Title II, funded over 
$4,000 for library materials. In addition, Medfield was fortunate to receive 
four special project grants amounting to $4,000. 

Under Public Law 864, Title III, N.D.E.A., Medfield received $10,000 
in reimbursements for two Reading projects, one Math project, and one 
Foreign Language project. 



117 



..we applied for Title IV, part C monies in the amount of $53,000 
nd a system directed project in reading and mathematics. 

We have also applied for three (3) Title III, N.D.E.A. in the areas of 
elementary reading, secondary reading, and secondary science. 




Dale Street Librarian, Joanne MacKenzie, discusses books with Laurel Hallowell 



ACKNOWLEDG MENTS 

We continue to benefit from the assistance and cooperation of all town 
departments. 

The continued high quality of professional and non-certificated employee 
contributions to the boys and girls of Medfield is noted with great 
appreciation. These past few years have been difficult for many of our school 
employees, due to the constant strain of the economy and the pressure to do 
more with less. I admire their fine spirit. 

The central office staff and administrative leadership people within 
the system have always been there when needed. Their reliability and 
•rtness are of exceptional quality. 

Increasing citizen involvement with the schools and on behalf of the 
ind the school children is noted with growing appreciation. The 
hundreds of volunteers have made our year much more successful than otherwise 
would have been the case. 



118 



Special credit should be bestowed upon our Medfield School Committee. 
They have had to operate for two years with less money than they felt 
necessary to run the school system. As a group they have wrestled with 
educational, financial, and political questions of real import. They perform 
an often thankless task, with no remuneration. Their civic contributions are 
extremely worthwhile - especially in these times. I salute them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUice C. VudUl^QA 

Superintendent of Schools 




Superintendent of Schools, Bruce C. Pulsifer, and Superintendent's Secretary, 
Virginia Kerr, refer to the town residents listing. 



119 



REPORT OF THE 
MEMORIAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I am pleased to submit the Memorial School annual report for the year 
ending December 31, 1975. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

The total number of students enrolled at Memorial School remained 
constant over the past year. However, the entering Kindergarten class now 
represents the largest grade population at the primary level. Class size at 
the Kindergarten level has increased by three children over the last school 
year. Corresponding decreases in other grades (1-3) enable Memorial School 
to maintain an overall pupil-teacher ratio of 22 to 1. 

The Learning Disabilities staff was increased to a full time position 
for the current school year and a new staff member fills the position of Media 
Specialist. 

PROGRAM 

Memorial School was awarded a competitive Title II federal grant to 
supplement the basic reading system. Through the efforts of the teaching 
staff, this grant proposal was written to provide audio-visual materials and 
supplementary reading books correlated to the basic reading program. 

Parent-Child Art Workshops have enhanced the Art curriculum during the 
school year. Under the direction of Mrs. Burke, parents are invited to 
participate in Art projects with their children at school. Thus far many 
enthusiastic parents have participated and samples of their work have been 
displayed at the annual Art Show. 

Regularly scheduled program evaluations have been on-going throughout the 
year. A new multi-leveled spelling program was adopted for grades two and 
three beginning in September 1975. Staff input and leadership from the 
English Coordinator resulted in the standardization of the Spelling program 
system-wide. Currently a committee is reviewing and evaluating basal Reading 
programs for possible adoption during the next school year. 

COMMUNITY-SCHOOL 

A significant change in format proved very successful during the annual 
Open House in October. Students were invited to guide their parents through 
the building and explain the program. Written curriculum summaries were 
distributed along with daily schedules prepared by the students. 

A positive reinforcement technique has been instituted in the school. 
Children receive written "Remarkables" which note individual achievements and 
positive behaviors sought by parents and staff. The success of this program 
has been outstanding thus far with many significant results noted. 



120 



Three hundred ninety-two parent conferences were conducted during the 
November reporting period. 

American Education Week brought many visitors to observe classrooms and 
the regular program being conducted throughout the building. 

The outstanding cooperative spirit and active support of the Memorial 
School staff have been instrumental in achieving continued improvements in 
our total program. Additionally, the support of parents, volunteers, 
Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent, School Committee, and other school 
support personnel is commendable and deeply appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ra64e££ A. V&veAemi 

Principal 




Memorial School Principal, Russell A. Devereau watches Sandra Higgins practice 
her penmanship. 



REPORT OF THE DALE STREET SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of the Dale Street School, it is my pleasure to submit my 
thirteenth Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 1975. 



121 



PROGRAMS 

The Mathematics curriculum was strengthened this year by the purchase of 
a new text and text materials for grades four, five, and six. The grade four 
Reading and English curriculum was improved and the scheduling changed by in- 
stituting a Language Arts program. The Science and Social Studies areas also 
adapt, change, and/or introduce new materials as conditions warrant and cir- 
cumstances allow. 

An Orientation Handbook, written by the Principal for grade three 
students was distributed in May. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

At present there are sixteen students less than on December 31, 1974. 
Because enrollment has been decreasing, one and one-half teaching positions 
were eliminated for September, 1975. However, the Speech and Learning 
Disabilities positions were increased to full time. With the addition of a 
Regional E.D. class housed at Dale Street all classrooms are utilized, with 
the Music Room also- being used as a homeroom. 

SCHOOL ACTIVITIES 

1. Fire Drills were conducted in May, September, and October. The entire 
school was evacuated in an average of one minute and twenty- two seconds. 

2. There were nine school assemblies for the children during the year. 

3. Each grade went on a curriculum-oriented field trip. 

A. The band and chorus performed for the students of the Wheelock and 
Memorial Schools. 

5. Intramural activities for boys and girls were offered throughout the year, 
All who wished to had the opportunity to participate. 

6. There was a three-game boys' basketball series and a two-game girls' 
softball series with the Wheelock school. 

7. The Annual Art and Music Festival was held in May. 

8. Separate Field Days were held for grades four, five, and six. 

9. Grade six held its annual end-of-the-year Afternoon Dance party in June. 

10. Sixth graders experienced the "Outdoor Classroom" for one week at Ponk- 
apoag in Canton in the Fall. 

SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY 

The community's participation in the Dale Street School educational 
program is welcomed. I wish to thank the many parents and friends who have 
voluntarily given of themselves and their time to enhance the learning ex- 
periences of the children. Some examples of this helpfulness are: 



122 



1. Parents' Advisory Council To the Principal 

2. Room mothers 

3. Community speakers on a variety of subjects in different school 
curriculum areas 

4. Field Trip chaperones 

5. Individual grade-level Open Houses 

6. Coffee and cakes for Open Houses 

7. Six-week Baby Sitting course offered by parents for sixth-grade girls 

8. Parent tutors for Reading and Learning Disabilities 

9. Parent assistance in the IMC 

10. Parent organization and supervision of the Bookmobile 

11. Parents of sixth grade students who participated in fund-raising 
activities for Ponkapoag 

I wish to thank the Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent, School 
Committee, the Faculty, and the citizens of Medfield for their cooperation and 
assistance during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

kUUvi K. B&lcheA 

Principal 




Dale Street School Principal Allan K. Belcher 



123 



REPORT OF THE RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

The seventh annual report is being submitted from the Ralph Wheelock 
School for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1975. 

The Language Arts block has been extended to grade 6, thus providing a 
greater continuity and application of fundamental skills to all areas of 
Reading and English. This increased time allotment enables the teacher to 
become more familiar with each child's strengths and weaknesses and to provide 
for the child a program geared to his or her needs. It also allows the 
teacher flexibility in the implementation of a wide variety of communicative 
activities for small groups and on an individual basis. 

At the intermediate level the following programs have been implemented 
during the study-activity periods to make more productive use of the student's 
time: 

1. The "Magic Circle" and "Duso" (Developing and Understanding of Self 
and Others) developmental guidance programs on the primary level 
have been extended to a regular weekly class of "Human Development" 

in grades 4-6. Through a multi-media approach, including film strips, 
group discussions, role playing, values clarification exercises, art 
activities, etc., basic understandings of human behavior and feelings, 
responsibilities, decision-making skills, and career awareness are 
explored and expanded. 

Emphasis is placed on building a child's self-confidence and a 
respect for self and others. This program is conducted by a joint 
effort of the couselor and teachers. 

2. Study Skills have been scheduled once a week. Students engage in 
specific library locational skills interrelated with other phases of 
the curriculum. Basically, it gives children additional opportun- 
ities to learn and increase such skills as alphabetizing, dictionary 
use, locating reference material, learning parts of a book, using 
the library, interpreting maps, charts and graphs, and organizing 
reports. These exercises are utilized selectively in conjunction 
with the various disciplines. In summary, this program attempts to 
teach children "how to study" and to develop and strengthen parti- 
cular skills as they are needed. 

3. This year, for the first time, chorus and band periods have been 
scheduled during study-activity periods. Two hundred students 
participating in chorus and one hundred students performing in the 
band, has resulted in the improvement of the total music program. 
The culmination and success of these activities are fully realized 
when the majority of the students perform publicly in one or more 
musical events during the school year. 



124 



Open Houses, Coffee Hours, Parent-Conferences, Classroom and School news- 
letters were aimed at achieving an improvement in communications between 
school and home and to provide specific information regarding programs, 
policies and procedures. 

The IMC Program this year incorporated into its open schedule a one week 
per month program whereby every class is assigned a half hour period for 
instruction in library skills and guidance in selecting reading material. As 
a result of this program, every student is able to visit the library at least 
once a month. During this scheduled week, materials may be checked out before 
and after school and during the first ten minutes of each period. Results of 
a survey taken among the teachers overwhelmingly indicated that this program 
is being well received and is of great value to the students. 

Appreciation is extended to the Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent, 
and School Committee for their support and cooperation. A special word of 
gratitude to the excellent faculty at the Wheelock School for their dedication 
and interest in providing for the total development of the children. We 
could not have achieved our school objectives without the assistance of 
coordinators, all other school personnel, volunteers, and parents. 

Respectfully submitted, 

flank J. Hodman 

Principal 




Wheelock School Principal, Frank Hoffman explains schedules to Eric Cannon 
and Grant Cos. 



125 



REPORT OF THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

With pleasure, I am submitting the Annual Report for the year ending 
December 31, 1975. 

Our September enrollment was 733 students distributed over three grade 
levels as follows: 

255 at grade seven, 250 at grade eight, 220 at grade nine, and 
8 SPED students. 

Summer workshops produced three individualized units in Social Science 
which have been implemented since September and in the Science area, the IPS 
program was restructured to provide for different ability groups. 

Under the implementation guidelines of law Chapter 622, the seventh grade 
program now includes experience for all students in Industrial Arts and Home 
Economics. Students at eighth grade level were provided with the opportunity 
to select either Industrial Arts or Home Economics. 

Two new courses have been added to the Social Science curricula at grade 
nine level. These courses are the American Indian and Psychology. 

A language arts bloc has been instituted at grade seven level. This 
program combines both Reading and English into one course for students. 

Two Music Concerts were performed during the year with great success. 
Plans are underway to present a musical for the Junior High. Efforts to 
realize this program are being made by members of the English and Music 
Departments. 

A very successful Combined Arts Show was presented in May. Exhibits in 
the areas of Art, Industrial Arts, and Home Economics were viewed with 
enthusiasm by the public. 

The seventh grade parent orientation program was continued this past fall. 
Parents were provided the opportunity to meet with school officials and staff 
members and to visit and observe classes. Continuing as part of the orienta- 
tion program, seventh grade students began their school year a day before 
eighth and ninth grade students. 

The Student Council held a very successful Dinner Dance for ninth grade 
students in June and have conducted a very good fund raising campaign to help 
sponsor assemblies and other student activities throughout the year. 

New staff members include Mr. Ekstrom in Math, and Mr. Ide, Assistant 
Principal who joined our staff in October replacing Mr. Robert Viera who re- 
signed for health reasons. 



126 



I thank the Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent, parent volunteers, 
the faculty and school personnel for their continued assistance and 
cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jame* W. O'Connzll 
Principal 




Junior High School Principal, James W. O'Connell and school secretary, Doris 
Droste. 



REPORT OF THE 
AMOS CLARK KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of Medfield High School, I respectfully submit our annual 
report for the year ending December 31, 1975. 

The official enrollment for the High School this past fall was 657. There 
were 210 graduates in the Class of 1975. Of these 54.3% went on to a four year 
college; 12.4% to a two year college; 3.3% to other post high school institu- 
tions; 1.4% joined the Armed Services, and 28.5% entered the world of work. 

The faculty of our school consists of 55 certified professionals. 
Advanced degrees are held by 73% of the staff. 



127 



During this past year we have been working closely with the coordinators 
and department heads in order to improve our curriculum offerings. We have 
re-evaluated our elective program and have eliminated several courses which 
we felt were not necessary. We also introduced some new courses which we 
feel will strengthen our curriculum. We have been stressing the teaching of 
fundamental skills in all subject areas. 

Our English department is attempting to correct a problem that has 
existed for some time. Over several years of growing student population and 
increased class size, English classes have become heterogeneous to a point 
where positive educational gains have been problematical. Students of 
extremely high and extremely low abilities have radically different skill- 
levels in reading and composition, grammar and usage, and in the past have 
been grouped together. Assignments have been too difficult for some and not 
challenging for others. Since reading is the common denominator in the vast 
majority of English courses, we have adopted a phased elective program based 
on reading ability. All students were tested and grouped by reading ability 
(phasing). Phasing will assure a multi-level heterogeneous mixture and will 
renew observation of academic standards in each class. Students selecting 
English courses for next year have been advised about courses for which they 
are qualified. 

This year our "Teacher Advisor" program has been expanded. 90% of the 
professional staff have volunteered to serve as advisors. 60% of our student 
body are taking advantage of this program. 

We introduced an "Honor Roll" during this school year. Students who 
receive grades of "A-" or better in all courses will achieve "High Honors". 
Those who receive grades of "B-" or better will achieve "Honors". 

Several parents volunteered to serve on the high school "Parent Advisory 
Committee". These parents have been meeting regularly with the principal, 
the faculty, and the students in order to discuss mutual concerns. 

In closing I wish to thank the Medfield School Committee, the 
Superintendent, the Assistant Superintendent, the professional staff, our 
student body, and the parents for their continued support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T (16 606 P. VUZzd(U 

Principal 



128 



GRADUATION EXERCISES OF 

MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 

CLASS of 1975 

SUNDAY, JUNE 8, 1975 4:30 P.M. 

PROGRAM 

Processional Class of 1975 

Pomp and Circumstance Elgar 

MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL BAND 
Douglas Godfrey, Director 

MARSHALLS 
Lynne T. Breed Stephen W. Johnson 

Invocation The Reverend Dr. Robert L. Wood 

The National Anthem Medfield High School Band 

Welcome Douglas J. Wisniewski, President , Class of 1975 

Honor Essays 

Charles A. McKay, Jr. Michelle F. Mellea 

Glee Club 

Climb Every Mountain Rodgers & Hammerstein 

I Believe Graham & Stillman 

Presentation of Class Gift Paul D. Wood, Vice President , Class of 1975 

Presentation of Student Council Scholastic Awards Stephen C. Bunn 

President , Student Council 

Presentation of American Field Service Representative Harry A. Kelleher 

Chairman, Board of Selectmen 

Presentation of Awards Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 

A Letter to the Graduates of Medfield High School from the 

President of the United States 
Harvard Prize Book 
D.A.R. Certificate 
Bausch & Lomb Science Award 
Faculty Awards of Merit 

Presentation of Scholarships 

Mrs. Edward Byrnes, Hannah Adams Club 

Richard M. Denton, President, Medfield Lions Club 

Stephen A. Nolan, President , Medfield Jaycees 

Paula Judge Brown, President , Medfield Teachers Association 

Paul E. Hinkley, A. L. Auxiliary, Beckwith Post No. 110 



129 



Thomas A. Seeley, Commander , A. L. Beckwith Post No. 110 
Chief William H. Mann, Medfield Police Association 
John C. Rudisill, Jr. .Corning Glass Company 



Presentation of American Legion Medals 



Charles W. Higgins 

Jr. Vice Commander 

A. L. Beckwith Post No. 110 



Medfield High School Concert Band 
Toccata 



Frescobaldi 



Presentation of Diplomas 

Dawn I. Austin, Chairperson, Medfield School Committee 
Dr. Bruce C. Pulsifer, Superintendent of Schools 
Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 



Benediction 
Recessional 

Consecration of the House 



The Reverend David H. Flanders 



Beethoven 



CLASS OF 1975 



Joseph Martin Allen 
Martin Frank Aronson 
Anna Lynne Bailey 
Vickie Amy Barrows 
Stephen Mark Bartnik 
Laurene Anne Battisti 
Barbara Sue Baumann 
Judith Ann Bell 
Scott Bernardo 
William Michael Bernick 
Mark Edward Berry 
Sandra Lynn Berry 
David Joseph Bivolcic 
Mary Patricia Bohen 
Roberta Lynn Boughton 
Susan Carol Bourne 
Matthew Thomas Brady 

*Karen Ann Brangwynne 
Mark McAllister Brayton 
Jeffrey Lynn Brewer 
Michael Wayne Brewer 
Debra Mohr Buchanan 
Thomas Edward Budwey 
Stephen Corey Bunn 
Pamela Anne Burks 

*Edward Gerard Byrnes, Jr. 
Caroline Caissie 
Donald William Scott Camp 
Caryn Jean Campbell 
Sheryl Lynn Capocci 

*Maureen Ann Capone 



Stewart Carlisle 

*Karen Elizabeth Carlson 

*Linda Sue Carroll 
Robert Cornelius Cerulle 
Daniel Joseph Champagne 
Thomas Alfred Chaplin 
+*Gennaro Cioglia,Neto 
George Arthur Cioto 
James B.Clarke 
Anthony Joseph Colella 
Karen C. Collura 

*Jean Louise Colt 
Ruth Christine Comeau 

*Jefre Alan Congelosi 
Robert Peter Conlon 
Glenn Allen Cooke 
Kathryn Lynn Coomber 
Paul J. Corkum 
Jeffrey Ross Crowcroft 
Michael Charles Cushing 
John Francis Doherty 

*Sheryl Marie Doherty 

*Barbara Ann Donovan 

*Pamela Jean Doub 
William A. Dugger 
Cynthia Diane Eilertson 
Kristen Lynn Farrar 
Cynthia Jean Ferreira 

*Cynthia Ann Flanders 
Ferris Reid Fleming 
Judith Ann Fowler 



130 






Dean Hazelton Franke 

Faith Andrea Fraser 

Wendy Elizabeth Fuller 

James Robert Gattuso 

Andrea Ruth Geller 

William James Gilmore.III 

Joy Gayle Graci 

Christopher Ward Greely 

Kenneth William Griffin 

Nancy Ruth Hallo ck 
*Kevin Richard Halloran 

Paula Marie Halloran 

Gail Mary Hamilton 
*Hary Ann Hamilton 

William Wallace Hankey 

H.Steven Hanners 

Lori Jean Hastings 
*Robert Andrew Hay 

Susan Janet Hogg 
*Margaret Elizabeth Holmes 

Cathleen Jean Hughes 

Fredric Evan Hultz 
*Kerry L. Hurd 

Jeffrey John Iafolla 

Kathy Lee Inman 

Robert Allen Jesse 

John Peter Johannessen 
* Jennifer Jones 

James Steven Kadar 
*Richard Frederick Kaerwer 
*Colleen Ann Kean 
*Paul James Kelleher 
*Melinda Susan Kemp 

Stephen Dana Kenney 

Kathleen Marie Kilcoyne 
*Diane Mildred Kneer 

Richard Harvey Larkin 

Virginia Marie Laverty 

Stephen Thomas Lawton 

Lawrence Stuart Lee 

Catherine Lennon 

Mark Francis Logue 

Robert Hardie Lovelace 

David John Lynch 

Gail Leslie MacKenzie 

Kirk Magnus sen 

Elaine Taylor Maguire 

Janice Kay Maguire 

Nancy Jean Martin 

Robert G. Martin 
*Lisa Jane Mastropieri 

Jennifer Tara Mayfield 

Joanne McCarthy 

Neil Joseph McCurry 

Kenneth Allen McGinnis 

Stephanie McHale 
*Charles Alan McKay, Jr. 



John Severance McVicar 

David Wesley Mead 

Ellen Louise Meader 
*Michelle Frances Mellea 
*Viviane C . Menard 
*Tracie Lea Miller 

Marian Lee Moffatt 

Catherine Ann Morris 

Mary Theresa Morris 

Ellen Louise Morse 

Lauryl Jane Munroe 

Joseph Edmund Murphy 

Paul Knut Newman 
*Helen Kimberly Nickerson 

Mark Albert Nyren 

Veda Lee O'Dell 

Nancy Jean O'Donnell 

Colette Mary Oglesby 

Richard Mansfield Olsen 

Janet Marie 'Toole 

Erich Buller Otting 

Paul Francis Quellette 

Douglas Alex Owens 

Gail Murdell Patterson 
*Philip Alan Peterson 

Ruth Ann Peterson 

Denise Elaine Phelan 

Karen Pini 

Elizabeth Ann Plunkett 

Philip Andrew Powell 

George A. Powers 

Scott Beekman Priest 
*Sherrie Lee Ramsauer 

Rajean Rose Randlett 

John Harold Reardon,III 
*Debra May Regan 

Cathleen Mary Ripley 

Stephen E. Ripley 

Jeffrey Philip Robie 

Christine Anne Rodgers 
*Linda Marie Rossier 

Joyce Leslie Rubino 

Lawrence Alexander Rucki 

Lynne Ann Rucki 
*Vanessa Louise Rudisill 

Patricia Ann Ryan 

Janet Dorman San ford 

Richard Adair Schrader 
*Heidi Anne Schultz 

Elizabeth Mary Sears 

Laura Ann Senatore 

Virginia Vallely Sexton 
*Donna Christine Sharkey 

Richard Edward Sharp 

Craig Harrison Sheard 

Michael Charles William Sheridan 

Maureen Ann Shiels 



131 



Spence DeForrest Shinner 

Paula S. Siroka 

Bruce Alan Sloan 
*Nance Lynne Snyder 

John Joseph Solari 

Christine Ann Spaulding 

Marie Spender 

Edward Benedict Sproules 

Mary Joanne Sproules 

Gary Wayne Starkey 

Donna Sue Stewart 
*Christine Louise Sullivan 
*Paul William Swanson 
^Barbara Louise Tannler 

Laura Jeanne Teague 

Andrew Francis Thompson 

Diane Marie Tortorici 



Thea Elizabeth Tringo 
Mark Eugene Twining 
Joyce Freida Vinson 
Donald Philip Vliet 
Gretchen Natalie Volk 
Daniel Steven Vollmuth 
Margot Marie Wallace 
Robert McCracken Watt 
Richard Dana Weiker,Jr. 

*llugh G. Werner 
Catherine Dean Wiggs 
Thomas Armstrong Winans 

*Douglas James Wisniewski 
Carolyn Judith Wood 
Paul Douglas Wood 
Karen Joan Woodlock 
Kim Marie York 



*National Honor Society Member 
+American Field Service Representative 




High School Principal, Tassos P. Filledes confers with secretary Pat Clarke 



132 



REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL SERVICES 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I am happy to report for the first time on the expanded Special Services 
Department. In September, 1975, the School Committee approved the administra- 
tive reorganization which combined the supervision of the guidance staff and 
the "special needs" staff. 

The first priority for the year was concerned with the implementation of 
Chapter 766. During the year changes were made in the evaluation procedures, 
eliminating the dual-level approach of school evaluation and system 
evaluation. The result of this change has been more effective use of time 
and resources, more service to individual schools by the system-wide special- 
ists, and a consistent procedure throughout the system. 

Since many of the "special needs" staff were new to the system, the year 
was spent in developing personal relationships, and becoming accepted as 
individuals; while also delivering direct service to the "special needs" 
students. That morale was maintained throughout the year is a credit to each 
staff member. 

Pre-school screening was offered in May for 3 and 4 year old children. 
Intended for those children suspected of having substantial disabilities, the 
process had no registrants. 

The kindergarten screening was also held in May, 1975. For the sixth 
year it has provided school personnel with much valuable information on how 
best to teach the children as they enter school. Further evaluations under 
the procedures of Chapter 766 were completed on 15% of the kindergarten 
entrants. 

A learning year for the community as well as for the Special Services 
Department, 1975 produced much discussion on the impact of Chapter 766. For 
the parents whose child was already receiving "special education", the 
changes were welcomed. But for the parents who were introduced to the new 
evaluation procedures having had no prior experience with "special education", 
there was a feeling of uneasiness. Yet with the completion of the process, 
most parents were grateful for the thoroughness and support of the team 
members . 

The guidance staff maintained their normal activities, as well as their 
functions under Chapter 766. On the elementary level the emphasis of the 
counselors has been on group work. Their time is split between prevention 
activities, such as conducting human development groups, and more traditional 
forms of couseling with children having adjustment problems. 

On the secondary level the guidance counselors are involved with advice 
on course selection, career guidance, college selection and acceptance 
procedures, and assisting with schedule conflicts and the overall schedule 
development. They are also available for assistance and advice with personal 
concerns of students and parents. The Team Approach to Guidance - Circle - 
involves students, teachers, and guidance counselors in assisting students to 

133 



reach their potential as members of the school and community. 

Immersed in the everyday activities of providing service in 1975, the 
Department also looks forward to 1976. With the development of a smooth 
evaluation process, attention can now be focused on quality service delivery 
The 1975 community survey results will assist us in giving the community the 
kind of service it desires. 

Based on my experience from 1975, I feel that next year will be as 
rewarding for me personally as for the community at large. 

Respectfully submitted, 

K&vin J. FZijnn 

Director of Special Services 



i 







IIIIIIIII 



Director of Special Services Kevin J. Flynn, 



134 



REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF MEDIA SERVICES 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

In the educational world, 1975 marked the maturity of media programs in 
the schools, with the publication of Media Programs: District and School . 
This is a culmination of a nine year project of two national organizations to 
formulate and provide guidelines for an effective educational media program; 
and for the first time, educators have been given a definitive, qualitative 
guide to the media program, based upon its primary function of providing 
resources and facilities for teaching and learning. 

The impact of this publication on Medfield has been an opportunity to 
compare our progress with the guidelines; and it is with a great deal of 
satisfaction that we find that our policies, programs, and services are in 
step with this national assessment, although our present status is somewhat 
behind the ideal. 

We are continuing to conduct a developmental program in media; that is, 
although there have been many new resources added to the schools of Medfield, 
there are many more which we can provide locally. Hopefully, even with the 
increasingly limited funds requested for media programs, we can still pursue 
this development in a limited degree. 

Statistics indicate that there is still increasing use of our media facil- 
ities, based largely upon teachers' increased knowledge of the resources avail- 
able and the large increase in independent studies. In addition, we can re- 
port several additional improvements in the past year. In Dale Street school, 
facilities have been expanded by the addition of a room to the IMC, and pro- 
vision has been made for some needed facilities for the local production of 
teaching materials. The High School has been provided with a microfilm 
reader-printer, for greater utilization and availability of the growing 
reference collection on microfilm. Two major programs have been developed for 
the in-service training of teachers in the production and use of instructional 
materials, and in operating equipment necessary for this procedure; during 
regular in-service days, several workshops have been conducted by media 
personnel, and this staff has also originated and conducted a course, "Media 
in Medfield" , for which participating teachers were awarded three increment 
credits. The staff is to be commended for their dedicated and professional 
conduct of these programs. 

During the current school year (1975-76) , the media personnel in all 
schools, in conjunction with classroom teachers, have been instrumental in 
pursuing a more formal instruction for all students in the use of IMC resources 
By linking this instruction to actual classroom and subject need, it is hoped 
that this will be a very realistic way to improve our students' skills in the 
area of research and reference. 

An increasing amount of our budget is constantly being demanded for the 
purpose of local production of instructional materials in accordance with the 
present availability of facilities in each IMC. It is k felt that this reflects 
an excellent movement by our teachers toward the production of more materials 
which are tailored to their specific needs. 



135 



The volunteer program continues to provide a great deal of help in the 
: of our media services and program, for which we are grateful. 

Once again, we would like to emphasize that our IMC's are open to the 
public, and we would like your participation whenever possible. If you feel 
that we might be of help in providing materials and/or equipment to any 
pubi . ant of Medfield, contact with my office will be welcome. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Van E. HoQan 

Director of Media Services 



mm 




Director of Media Services, Dan Hogan, holds a copy of Tilden's "History of 
Medfield." Several copies of this book were presented to the Medfield Public 
Schools by Corning Glass Company. 



136 



REPORT OF MEDFIELD ADULT EDUCATION 



TO: Members of the School Committee and Dr. Bruce C. Pulsifer, 
Superintendent of Schools, 

January 6, 1975 was the beginning of the second semester of the 1974-75 
Adult Education Program. A total of 22 classes in 17 different courses were 
continued by the director. The courses were Flower Arrangement, Clothing T, 
Typing I, Painting, Driver Education, Drawing, Woodworking, Cym for Men, 
Slimnastics, Tennis, Italian Cooking, Golf, Spanish, Decoupage, Shorthand, 
Advanced Flower Arrangement, and Yoga. Courses discontinued were Leathercraft 
Speed Reading, Bridge, Sewing II, and Painting II. 

The 1975-1976 Adult Education Program had an initial offering of 30 
different courses. 25 of these courses were established witli double offerings 
in Flower Arrangement, Tennis, Woodworking, Drivers Education, Yoga, and 
Italian Cooking. New courses established were Craft Boutique, Needlepoint, 
Photography, Holiday Workshop, and Automotive Maintenance. 515 people regis- 
tered for these courses during the registration period. 

118 students were enrolled for the Drivers Education program in January 
1975. 

This year we requested and received State Funds to support the Adult 
Education Program. The School Committee had approved a tuition increase from 
$12.00 to $15.00 for 15 week courses, and 10 week courses were to be $10.00. 
Both of these increases were to be effective in September of 1975. 

Achievement night for the 1975-1976 Adult Education Program will be held 
on Thursday, April 8, 1976. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joan Cuoco 

Director 









137 



REPORT OF THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my fifth report as the Athletic Director for the 
year ending December 31, 1975. The interscholastic athletic program at the 
Junior High school and the High school is part of the curriculum. 



Junior High teams were fielded in football 
coaching staff was: 



basketball and baseball. The 



Football - eighth & ninth grades 

Basketball - freshman 

- seventh & eighth grad< 

Baseball - freshman 

- seventh & eighth grad< 



Edward Findlen 
George Calimeris 
Gordon Hodne 
Robert Hunter 
Gary Stockbridge 
William Toof 
Richard Connolly 



High school boys teams in cross country, football, basketball, baseball, 
golf, outdoor track, and tennis competed in the Tri Valley League. The boys 
soccer team competed in the Dual County League, while boys indoor track 
competed in the Massachusetts Suburban Indoor Track League. High school 
girls teams in cross country, field hockey, volleyball, gymnastics, basketball 
softball, and tennis competed in the Tri Valley League. Cross country and 
volleyball were new sports offerings for girls in 1975. The coaching staff 
was : 



Football 
Basketball 



Baseball 

Golf 

Outdoor Track 

Boys Tennis 

Soccer 

Indoor Track 

Cross Country 

(boys) 
Cross Country 

(girls) 
Field Hockey 
Volleyball 
Gymnastics 
Basketball 



Softball 
Girls Tennis 
Cheerleading 



(varsity) William Young (head), Gary Youlden (asst.) 

(J.V.) David Gibbs 

(varsity) George Ruggiero, (J.V.) David Gibbs 

(above during January & February, 1975) 

(varsity) David Gibbs, (J.V.) John Eckstrom 

(above beginning December, 1975) 

(varsity) Gordon Hodne, (J.V.) Gary Stockbridge 

James Sproul 

Robert Belmont (head), Gary Youlden (asst.) 

Robert Hunter 

(varsity) Thomas Cowell, (J.V.) Ralph LeClere 

Gary Youlden 

Robert Belmont 



Mary Ellen Rice 

(varsity) Nancy Kelley, 

Judith Noble 

Mary Robbins 

(varsity) Karen Graham, 

(above during January & February, 1975) 

(J.V.) Suzanne Moulton (beginning December 1975) 

(varsity) Suzanne Moulton, (J.V.) Nancy Kelley 

Susan Carney 

Judith Noble & Denise Cashen 



(J.V.) Suzanne Moulton 



(J.V.) Rose Dugger 



138 



The Golf team played at Glen Ellen Country Club in Millis, The Park and 
Recreation Commission provided scheduled practice and game time on the 
Metacomet tennis courts, and allowed junior varsity Softball to play on the 
Little League field. The Big Blue basketball team won the Tri Valley League 
championship and competed in the Eastern Massachusetts State Basketball 
Tournament. 

The Medfield School Boosters sponsored a Sports Banquet for all high 
school interscholastic participants. Trophies were awarded for Most Valuable 
Player in each varsity sport. The Edward Keyes School Spirit Award, a plaque 
and a $300.00 stipend, was presented to Douglas Wisniewski. The Schoral 
Athlete awards were presented to Paul Kelleher and Christine Sullivan. 

The School Committee voted to implement Chapter 622 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws over a two year period. Funds were provided for girls teams in 
volleyball, cross country, and outdoor track at the high school for the 
1975-1976 school year. The Committee intends to phase-in three girls sports 
(field hockey, basketball and softball) at the junior high school during the 
1976-77 school year. The above additions are a part of the continuing effort 
to provide equal opportunity for girls in the athletic curriculum. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SoAviaAd S/ieo. 

Athletic Director 




Chester Banks follows action in Big Blue's game with Holliston 



139 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with pleasure that I submit this annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1975. 

In February a new convection oven, steam kettle, and pressure cooker 
compartments were installed at the High School. With the assistance of "state 
funds" the High School is to have a much needed new dishwasher. 

Due to the increase in food prices it was necessary to charge fifty cents 
for lunches during May and June. In September the price of lunch was lowered 
to forty five cents. This five cent decrease was made possible through an 
increase of state and government reimbursements and a greater selection of 
food commodities. 

The Food Service Program is pleased to be serving a larger number of free 
and reduced lunches this year due to the change in the "income eligibility 
criteria." A new "eligibility criteria" is to be available the first part of 
1976. 

Pizza is on the lunch menu more frequently this past year because it is 
found to be students favorite food. In fact, because of its popularity, every 
Friday at Memorial School is Pizza Day. The participation on Pizza Day has 
increased about forty percent. 

School lunches continue to meet one-third the daily nutritional require- 
ments of every child. A school lunch is really less money than a lunch 
brought from home if the parent is supplying their child with the daily 
nutritional requirements. 

I sincerely thank the Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent, School 
Committee, Cafeteria Staff and other personnel for their assistance during 
the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Voiothy E. AveAy 

School Lunch Director 



140 




Rita Hutt serves student lunch at the High School cafeteria. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 
OF BUILDINGS ANDGROUNDS 



To the Superintendent: 

It is a pleasure to submit my seventh annual report as Director of 
Buildings and Grounds for the year ending December 31, 1975. 

The following is a compilation of repair, replacement, additions and 
preventive maintenance done on our schools during the past year. 

MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

Installed new fluorescent lighting in the corridors of the old wing. 

Installed new breaker panels and switches in all classrooms of the old 

wing . 

Installed two air conditioners, one in the front office and one in the 

Principal's office. 

Paneled the Principal's office. 

Installed exhaust fan in the teachers' lounge. 

DALE STREET SCHOOL 

Repaired and replaced sections of the stage curtains. 
Varnished all doors and window sills. 
Installed partition in speech room. 
Installed 16 new classroom window shades. 



141 



DALE STREET SCHOOL (continued) 

Installed two air conditioners, one in the School Committee Room and one 
in the Principal's Office. 

RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

Installed smoke doors in the corridor leading to the boiler room. 

Rebuilt water circulating pump. 

Repaired folding stage doors. 

Repaired nine univent motors. 

Painted garage doors. 

Installed hoods over all outside fresh air intakes. 

Installed two air conditioners, one in the main office and one in the 

Principal's Office. 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Replaced sixty classroom window shades. 

Painted all outside doors. 

Replaced sewing room exit door which was damaged by a car. 

Repaired motor and pump in the septic system. 

Repaired field house which was damaged by vandals. 

Installed cable for scoreboard. 

Installed eye wash and shower units in classroom laboratory areas. 

Installed three air conditioners, one in the front office and two in 

the Special Services Office. 

SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Installed asphalt for outside smoking area. 

Repaired and replaced sections of the stage curtains. 

Installed five new window shades in the office section. 

Installed eye wash and shower units in classroom laboratory areas. 

Installed three air conditioners in the administration wing. 

Repaired forty foot section of underground pipe for sprinkler system 

in the practice football field. 

Painted complete boiler room. 

ALL SCHOOLS 

Burners, boilers, smoke pipes, chimneys, and fire boxes were all cleaned 

and repaired. 

Locker rooms and receiving room floors all painted. 

Gym floors, bleachers, and stages all revarnished. 

Replacement of glass, and repairs to all of our school property caused 

by vandalism. 

I am grateful for the support given to me by my entire staff. 

Sincere appreciation is extended to the School Committee, Superintendent, 
and Assistant Superintendent for their cooperation and assistance during the 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HaAold VhJjLovil 

Director of Buildings and Grounds 

142 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 
VITAL STATISTICS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1975 



143 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



Chapter 45 of the General Laws of Massachusetts requires that 
every physician shall within fifteen days after the birth at which 
he has officiated, report the same to the Town Clerk of the Town in 
which the birth took place. 

Parents within forty days after the birth of a child and every 
house-holder, within forty days after a birth in his house shall 
cause notice thereof to be given to the Town Clerk of the Town in 
which the birth took place. 

Failure to give such notice is punishable with a fine. 

Blanks for the return may be obtained upon application to the 
Town Clerk. 

Parents and others are requested to carefully examine the 
following lists and if there are any errors or omissions, report 
such at once to the Town Clerk. This is important so that we may 
have as accurate and complete a record of Vital Statistics as 
possible. 



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147 



MARRIAGES RECORDED IN MEDFIELD 

1975 



1974 
August 31 

August 31 

1975 
January 4 

February 2 

February 8 

February 8 

February 9 

February 14 

February 27 

March 7 

March 8 

March 14 

March 15 

March 15 

March 22 

March 22 

March 28 

April 5 

April 7 

April 12 
April 12 
April 18 
April 19 
April 20 
April 23 



Mario D'Eramo of Sherborn and 
Debra J. Poor of Medfield 
Wayne R. Stokes of Medfield and 
Suzanne M. McCarthy of Medfield 

John W. Alban of Lowell and 

Brenda Lee Fralin of Lowell 

Brian T. Laverty of Medfield and 

Joanne S. Rubino of Millis 

Ronald L. Smith of Medfield and 

Alicia Marie Biondi of Medfield 

John G. Faria of Cambridge and 

Barbara Anne Swanson of Cambridge 

Anthony E. Polillio, Jr. of Stoughton and 

Phyllis A. Plausse (Matarazzo) of Medfield 

Cameron Mark Temple of Milton and 

Beverly Jeanne Peebles of Medfield 

Arthur C. Rogers of Medfield and 

Mary Tocci (Shurtleff) of Medfield 

Mark A. Brow of Plymton and 

Susan Travers of Medfield 

Mark 0. Lewis of Framingham and 

Lynda K. Johnson of Natchitiches, La. 

James S. Eppehimer of Medfield and 

Linda J. Kadar of Medfield 

Paul A. Simpson of Medfield and 

Karen L. Boyt of Medfield 

Albert J. Houde, Jr. of Medfield and 

Gillian Mary Poole of Medfield 

Thomas S. Prince of Medfield and 

Linda Adams of Framingham 

Walter J. Hersee of Medfield and 

Marilyn F. Shaw of Millis 

James Mosher of Millis and 

Elizabeth Albee (Loomis) of Medfield 

Edward Foley of Medfield and 

Elaine Aho (Jacobs) of Medfield 

John Kawana of Medfield and 

Virginia Walsh (Fair) of Medfield 

Charles V. Haigh of Medfield and 

Olivia B. Barwick of Medfield 

Richard L. Goodwin, Jr. of Medfield and 

Kathleen T. Dexter of New Bedford 

Daniel M. Capone of Medfield and 

Annabella Marsicovetere , Guademala City ,Guademala 

Francis R. Kuhlman of Bellingham and 

Deborah L. Stoddard of Medfield 

Hans Warnick, Jr. of Westwood and 

Nancy Wicker of Medfield 

T. Richard Tomney of Medfield 

and Isabel Fort of Barcelona, Spain 



148 



April 26 Robert Thomas Parsons of Framingham and 

Deborah Shields of Medfield 
May 9 Willard Thomas Roy of Franklin and 

Terri-Anne Rogers of Medfield 
May 17 Philip B. Davis of Medfield and 

Carole J. Pearson of Somerville 
May 18 David C. Ashe of Medfield and 

Jacqueline D. Mandigo of Medfield 
June 7 Andrew A. Caffrey, Jr. of Andover and 

Alice A. Swanson of Medfield 
June 7 Mark J. Koris of Medfield and 

Francine M. Amore of Andover 
June 14 Ernest H. Allard of Millis and 

Jeannette C. Lovelace of Medfield 
June 14 Claude B. Levesque of Medfield and 

Nancy Anne Conners of Medfield 
June 15 Joseph A. Ouellette of Medfield and 

Jean M. Clougherty of Medfield 
June 20 Joseph B. Beauregard 3rd of Medfield and 

Susan Y. Farrell of Medway 
June 20 Andrew Logie of Franklin and 

Elizabeth Rogers of Medfield 
June 21 John F. Kelleher of Cambridge and 

Julia E. Dahlen of Cambridge 
June 21 Stanley Baker of Medfield and 

Elizabeth Price of Framingham 
June 27 Frank H. Sabadini of Norwood and 

Paula (Mezzetti) Kelley of Medfield 
June 28 Frederick J. Dufault of Allston and 

Mary Sharon Ganley of Medfield 
June 28 James L. Damm of Millis and 

Pamela M. Williams (Malloy) 
June 28 James E. Allen of Medfield and 

Nancy A. Morin of Westwood 
July 5 Neil F. Cronin of Amherst and 

Roxanne Morris of Amherst 
July 12 Ronald E. Lindblad of Medfield and 

Judith J. Huneck of Sudbury 
July 12 Arthur R. French of Byram, Conn, and 

Sheryl March of Medfield 
July 12 Scott Rollins Parmelee of Rocky Hill Conn, and 

Karlen J. Peterson of Avon 
July 19 Frank A. Mellen of Cambridge and 

Nancy Capers of Medfield 
July 20 Ronald L. Hill of Oxnard, Calif, and 

Linda M. Kupelian of Medfield 
July 26 James H. Rayner of Medfield and 

Diane J. Rebecchi of Medfield 
August 2 James T. Ronan of South Natick and 

Helen F. Cahill of Medfield 
August 16 James C. Doherty of Millis and 

Jane A. Hastings (Leonard) of Medfield 
August 16 William T. O'Neil of Boston and 

Kathy E. Macintosh of Medfield 



149 



J. Parker Thompson of Medfield and 

Ellen L. Morse of Medfield 
st 16 Howard R. Sheridan of Medfield and 

Stacey D. Riberdy of Hyannis 
August 23 Paul M. Collins of Medfield and 

Ruth A. Peterson of Medfield 
August 23 Robert J. Cole of Miami, Florida and 

Lauryn Anne Rossi of Medfield 
August 23 Dennis J. Keating of Medfield and 

Joan Sinatra of Medfield 
August 29 John T. Powers of Medfield and 

Carole E. Stribley (Ehnes) of Medfield 
September 6 Robert C. Cleaver of Fairfield, Conn, and 

Debra A. Westine of Medfield 
September 12 Mark Dale Langley of Millis and 

Francesca Anne Pope of Millis 
September 27 Raymond Steele of Medfield and 

Beverly Ann Uvezian of Medfield 
September 27 Eugene Fischer, Jr. of Norwood and 

Theresa E. Alley of Medfield 
October 11 Robert J. Reardon of Medfield and 

Lynne M. DelRios (McLaughlin) of Medfield 
October 11 Walter H. Tortorici, Jr. of Medfield and 

Debra J. Sherman of Medfield 
October 11 Jay Gerber of Westwood and 

Sylvia I. Kohn of Medfield 
October 11 Geogory S. Bearer of Medfield and 

Theresa L. Morenzetti of Hopkinton 
October 17 Richard C. Werner of Medfield and 

Dianne L. Murphy of Medfield 
October 18 Kenneth R. Martin of Watertown and 

Dianne C. Gould of Medfield 
October 25 Matthew Marks of Franklin and 

Kathleen Crump of Medfield 
November 1 Kevin P. Griswold of Taunton and 

Robin D. Erichsen of Medfield 
November 8 Frederick T. Barwick of Millis and 

Joyce L. Rubino of Medfield 
November 29 Richard H. Taylor of Richlands, N.C. and 

Elizabeth Jane Shepardson (May)of Richlands, N.C 
November 29 Henry R. Bazigian of Holliston and 

Joyce E. Robinson of Medfield 
November 29 William S. McDonald of Milford and 

Debra L. Kingsbury of Medfield 
December 4 Richard Francis Clancy, Jr. of Millis 

and Sheryl Capocci of Medfield 
December 7 Shawn R. Prince of Medfield and 

Marilyn E. Phipps of Medfield 
December 14 John J. McGuigan, III of Winchester and 

Susan Eve Geller of Medfield 
December 21 Richard Frank Scarano of Brockton and 

Linda Claire Coffin of Medfield 



150 



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152 



TOWNOFMEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



NORFOLK, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, 
greetings : 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in 
town affairs to meet at the Memorial School, in said Medfield, on Monday, the 
thirty-first day of March A.D. , 1975 at 6:00 o'clock A.M., then and there to 
act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually by 
ballot, viz: 

One Moderator for one year. 

One member of the School Committee for two years. 

One Selectman, one Assessor, two members of School Committee, two 
Library Trustees, one Treasurer, and three Park Commissioners, all for 
three years. 

One member of Planning Board, and one member of Housing Authority, both 
for five years. 

BALLOT QUESTIONS 

Question 1 Beano Question 

Shall the Town vote to allow granting of licenses for the operation, holding 
or conducting of the game commonly called Beano, or substantially the same 
game under another name, in connection with which prizes are offered to be 
won by chance? 

Yes No 

Summary 

If the majority of the votes on this question are in" the affirmative, 
the State Lottery Commission may grant licenses for the operation, 
holding or conducting of Beano games for prizes , in the Town of 
Medfield to certain fraternal, religious, public service and 
charitable organizations. 

Question 2 Charter Amendment 

Shall the Town Charter be amended by making the changes proposed by the 
Special Town Meeting of May 6, 1974 as follows: 



153 



Section 2-2. shall read "Time of Annual Town Meeting for Transaction of 
Business . " 

"The annual town meeting for transaction of business shall be held on the 
last Monday in April." 

Section 2-5. shall read "Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting for Transaction 
of Business." 

"The board of selectmen shall prepare the warrant for the annual town 
meeting for the transaction of business and shall each year establish 
the date at which it is closed for the submission of articles. However, 
in no event shall the warrant for each annual town meeting remain open 
for submission of articles beyond March 15." 

The first sentence of Section 2-8 "Warrant Reports" shall read as follows: 

"A warrant report for the annual town meeting shall be assembled and 
printed by the board of selectmen and placed in distribution to the 
households of the town not less than two weeks prior to the town 
meeting for transaction of business to be held on the last Monday in 

April." 

The third sentence of Section 2-9 "The Warrant Committee" shall read as 
follows : 

"It shall hold a public hearing not less than thirty days prior to the 
annual town meeting for transaction of Business to be held on the last 
Monday in April, to inform the residents of the town of its proposed 
recommendations and to hear testimony and argument before publication 
of its final recommendations." 

The third sentence of Section 3-4 "Fiscal Procedures" shall read as follows: 

"They shall deliver this budget to the warrant committee for its review 
and recommendation no later than ninety days before the annual town 
meeting for transaction of business to be held on the last Monday in 

April." 

Yes No 

Summary 

If the majority of the votes on this question are in the affirmative, the 
amendments will bring the time of the Warrant Report and Warrant Hearing 
closer to the time of the Annual Town Meeting for transaction of 
business . 

The polls will be opened at 6:00 o'clock A.M. and shall be closed at 
8:00 o'clock P.M. 

On Monday, the twenty-eighth day of April A.D. 1975 commencing at 
7:30 P.M., the following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark 

154 



Kingsbury School Gymnasium in said Medfield, viz: 

ARTICLES 2 THROUGH 47 WILL APPEAR WITH THE REPORT OF ADJOURNED TOWN 

MEETING APRIL 28, 1975 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posing an attested copy 
thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days 
at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings 
thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this eleventh day of February, A.D. , Nineteen 
Hundred and Seventy-five. 

Hcwiy A. KoJULdhzA 
Jot&ph L. MaAcionoXtz 
AsutkuA L. Foaaoa 
Selectmen of Medfield 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Medfield, Massachusett: 
March 22, 1975 



Norfolk, ss 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants 
of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections to meet at the time 
and for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said warrant in not 
less than five public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven days 
before the time of holding the meeting. 

Wiltiam H. Mann 
Constable of Medfield 



155 



Pursuant to the foregoing warrant the meeting was opened at 6:00 A.M. by 
the reading of the warrant through Article 1. The ballot boxes were checked 
and found to be in working order, voting lists displayed and instructions to 
voters and specimen ballots posted within the polling place. 

The following persons were sworn in and assigned to their Precincts. 

PRECINCT ONE: Warden, John Ganley; Clerk, Florence Roberts; Tellers, 
Mary MairEtienne, Mae Maguire 

PRECINCT TWO: Warden, Elmer Portmann; Clerk, Anna Murphy; Tellers, 
Phyllis Ripley, Marion Bosselman 

PRECINCT THREE: Warden, Clara DeNucci; Clerk, Frederick Rogers; Tellers, 
Phyllis Wilmarth, Eva Grover 

PRECINCT FOUR: Warden, Barbara Connors; Clerk, Jane Kelly; Tellers, 
Beatrice Bangs, Richard DeSorgher 

The polls were declared closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote cast was 1888. This included 22 absentee ballots. 

The tabulation and counting of ballots cast was as follows: 

PRECINCTS 

12 3 4 Total 



Ralph C. Copeland 


186 


223 


334 


249 


992 


William F. Nourse 


179 


252 


184 


227 


842 


Blanks 


9 


15 


16 


14 


54 


MEMBER OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE - 


- 2 years 










David E. Hansen 


286 


384 


445 


385 


1500 


Blanks 


86 


106 


88 


105 


385 


Scattered 


2 




1 




3 


TREASURER - 3 years 












Edward F. Barrett, Jr. 


308 


392 


441 


393 


1534 


Blanks 


65 


98 


93 


97 


353 


Scattered 


1 








1 



156 



PRECINCTS 

12 3 4 Total 



SELECTMEN - 3 years 

Clement M. Frazier 56 39 32 54 181 

Harold E. Plough 67 46 110 70 293 

R. Edward Beard 197 305 231 270 1003 

Thomas A. McGinnis 48 93 150 91 382 

Blanks 6 6 11 5 28 

Scattered 1 1 

ASSESSOR - 3 years 

Melville J. Mills, Jr. 306 406 442 410 1564 

Blanks 68 84 91 79 322 

Scattered 11 2 

TRUSTEES OF PUBLIC LIBRARY - 3 

Mary Ellen Donahue 290 393 429 387 1499 

Barbara Houck 30 39 53 37 159 

Scattered 3 16 5 15 

Blanks 425 547 580 551 2103 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE (2) - 3 years 

John C. Rudisill 194 261 319 255 1029 

Philip J. Burr 270 327 318 356 1271 

Phyllis Cohen 155 201 246 184 786 

Blanks 129 191 184 185 689 

Scattered 1 1 

PARK & RECREATION COMMISSION (3) 

Genie T. Roberts 183 252 322 273 1030 

Norman P. Fitch 175 211 260 198 844 

Eric W. O'Brien 223 337 355 322 1237 

Warren F. Sheard 213 304 316 308 1141 

Blanks 328 366 349 368 1411 

Scattered 1 1 

PLANNING BOARD - five years 

C. Richard McCullough 283 393 451 385 1512 

Blanks 89 97 83 104 373 

Scattered 2 13 

MEMBER OF HOUSING AUTHORITY - five years 

Richard Knopf 43 32 30 105 

Scattered 9 29 11 5 54 

Blanks 322 461 491 455 1729 



67 


46 


110 


70 


197 


305 


231 


270 


48 


93 


150 


91 


6 


6 

1 


11 


5 


306 


406 


442 


410 


68 


84 


91 


79 






1 


1 


ars 








290 


393 


429 


387 


30 


39 


53 


37 


3 


1 


6 


5 


425 


547 


580 


551 


194 


261 


319 


255 


270 


327 


318 


356 


155 


201 


246 


184 


129 


191 


184 

1 


185 


- 3 


years 






183 


252 


322 


273 


175 


211 


260 


198 


223 


337 


355 


322 


213 


304 


316 


308 


328 


366 


349 


368 

1 


283 


393 


451 


385 


89 


97 


83 


104 


2 






1 


re years 






43 




32 


30 


9 


29 


11 


5 


322 


461 


491 


455 



QUESTIONS 



1. yes 240 331 307 307 1185 

no 113 133 201 153 600 

Blanks 21 26 26 30 103 



157 



PRECINCTS 
12 3 



Total 



QUESTIONS Cont 



yes 

no 

Blanks 



288 399 463 376 
25 24 29 32 
61 67 42 82 



1526 
110 

252 



Tellers for counting ballots after the polls were closed were: 

Mary Mair Etienne, Beatrice Bangs, John F. Ganley, Florence E. Roberts, 
Mabelle Maguire, Elmer 0. Portmann, Jr., Phyllis L. Ripley, Barbara P. 
Armstrong, Steven M. Rudnick, Jonathan E. Early, Eva Grover, Margaret D. 
Bernick, Richard Desorgher, Donald H. Harding, John L. Demartino, Jr., Sarah 
Regan, Louise Pini, Jane E. Minesinger, Virginia Cusack, Jane Kelly, Mary 
Nyren, Mary Sharon Ganley, Jessie H. Portmann, Jean E. Sander, Janice E. 
Ripley, Evelyn Gronberg, Mary Harney, William P. Mikelonis, Linda A. Bohn , 
Roberta Kolsti, Benjamin P. Astley, Mary Lovell, Phyllis D. Wilmarth, Clara 
DeNucci, Ann Murphy, Marion E. Bosselman, Jeannette Lovelace, Weston G. 
Kolsti, Beverly C. Smith, Dwight E. Adams, Elizabeth A. Ippoliti, Frederick 
A. Rogers, Jr., Barbara Connors. 

After the results were publicly announced, the Ballots, tally sheets and 
master sheet were turned over to the Town Clerk for safe keeping as prescribed 

by law. 



A true copy attest 



Nancy J. PieAton, 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
FOR THE TRANSACTION OF BUSINESS 

April 28, 1975 



The meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 7:45 P.M. at the 
Amos Clark Kingsbury High School Gymnasium after ascertaining that a quorum 
was present. Those present were invited to join in the Salute to the Flag. 
Following the reading of the service of the Warrant for the Meeting, the 
following action was taken on the Articles appearing in the Warrant. 

NOTE: The action taken on all articles will be recorded 
in their regular sequence regardless of the order 
on which they were voted. 

The meeting was adjourned at 8 P.M. and reconvened at 9:35 P.M. 



158 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports 
Town Officers for the past year. 



if the several 



ARTICLE 2. Voted to receive the reports of the several Town Officers for 
the past year. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or transfer from 
available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any other Town 
Officer Board, Commission and Committee to defray operating expenses of the 
Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1975, or such other sums as the 
Town may determine as required by General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 3. Voted to raise and appropriate the following named sums of 
money to defray the departmental and other expenses of the Town for the 
fiscal year commencing July 1, 1975, as required by General Laws, 
Chapter 41, Section 108: 



A100-00 Selectmen 
A100-01 Administration 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

300 Supplies 

400 Other Charges 

500 Equipment 



$ 1,975. 
2,680. 
2,500. 

-0-. 

-0-. 



$ 7,155, 



A100-02 Town Accountant 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 



-0-, 
150, 
-0-, 



150. 



A100-03 Executive Secretary 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 



A100-04 Data Processing 
200 Operations 



Total A100-01, 02, 03, 



A101-00 Town Counsel 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
400 Other Charges 

A102-00 Treasurer 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 



98,390. 




425. 




150. 






98,965.* 




11,033. 


)4 $117,303 




6,200. 




2,500. 




80. 




-0-. 


8,780. 


4,400. 




2,600. 




50. 


7,050.* 



159 



A103-00 Tax Collector 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
500 Equipment 



A104-00 Town Clerk 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
500 Equipment 



$ 4,400. 

680. 

1,860. 

120. 



3,000. 
655. 
122. 
-0-. 



$ 7,060, 



3,777 



A105-00 Assessors 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
400 Other Charges 
500 Equipment 



1,750 

12,475. 

810. 

800. 

-0-. 



15,835 



A106-00 Planning Board 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 



-0-. 

8,300. 

40. 



8,340.* 



A107-00 Park & Recreation 
A107-01 Administration 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

300 Supplies 

500 Equipment 



317. 

4,237. 

260. 

3,500. 



8,314.* 



100 Personnel 


11,121. 


200 Operations 


2,697. 


300 Supplies 


185. 


A107-03 Recreation Programs 




100 Personnel 


7,911. 


200 Operations 


2,565. 


300 Supplies 


1,780. 


400 Other 


1,500. 



14,003.* 



13,756, 



A107-04 Parks 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
500 Capital Expenditures 



2 


,500. 


1 


,707. 




100. 




-0-. 



4,307, 



160 



A107-05 Skating 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



300, 
200, 



$ 500. 



Total A107-01 thru 05 $40,880, 



A108-00 Election & Registration 




100 Personnel 


5,175. 


200 Operations 


3,280. 


300 Supplies 


58. 


500 Equipment 


-0-. 



8,513, 



A109-00 Town Hall 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 



9,000, 

14,970, 

7,900, 



31,870.* 



A110-00 Highway Department 
A110-01 Administration 

100 Personnel 

300 Supplies 



43,294 
1,350, 



44,644.* 



A110-04 Maintenance 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



A110-05 Sidewalks 



93,903 
50,670, 



144,573.* 
2,000. 



A110-06 Snow & Ice 
100 Personnel 



15,500 



200 Operations 


40,000. 


55,500.* 


A110-07 Town Garage 
200 Operations 




6,655. 


Total A110-01 thru 07 


$253,372. 





Alll-00 Police 
Alll-01 Administration 
100 Personnel 



47,163. 



Alll-02 Operations 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 



176,846, 
7,975, 
1,050, 



185,871.* 



161 



Alll-03 Cruiser 
200 Operations $ 10,800. 

500 Equipment 8,000. 



$ 18,800. 



Alll-04 Communications 
200 Operations 5,960. 

Alll-05 Traffic Marking & Signs 
200 Operations 6,000. 

Alll-06 School Traffic 
100 Personnel 11,794. 

200 Operations 300. 

12,094. 

Alll-09 Equipment Acquisition 
500 Equipment -0-.* 

Total Alll-01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 09 $275,888. 

A112-00 Fire Department 
A112-01 Administration 

100 Personnel 14,489. 

200 Operations 900. 

15,389.* 

A112-02 Operations 
100 Personnel 30,247. 

200 Operations 11,885. 

500 Equipment 2,800. 

44,932.* 

A114-00 Tree & Moth 
A114-01 Mosquito Control 
200 Operations 2,800. 

A114-02 Tree Care 

100 Personnel 8,000. 

200 Operations 1,600. 

300 Supplies 50^ 



A114-03 Insect & Pest Control 
100 Personnel 1,000 

200 Operations 1,500, 



A114-04 Dutch Elm 
100 Personnel 1,800. 

200 Operations 825. 



Total A114-01, 02, 03, 04 $17,575 
162 



9,650, 



2,500, 



2,625. 



A115-00 Building Inspector 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
400 Other Charges 
500 Equipment 



$ 7,275. 
800. 
500. 
-0-. 
-0-. 



$ 8,575* 



A116-00 Plumbing Inspector 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



1,200. 
135. 



1,335 



A117-00 Gas Inspector 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



800. 
90. 



890. 



100 Personnel 




2,600. 




200 Operations 




400. 


3,000.* 


A119-00 Sealer Wts. 


& Measures 






100 Personnel 




225. 




200 Operations 




130. 





355.* 



A120-00 Dog Officer 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 



9,000. 
820. 
-0-. 



9,820.* 



A121-00 Civil Defense 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
500 Equipment 



660. 
100. 
900. 



1,660.* 



A122-00 Board of Appeals 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 



700. 

700. 

40. 



1,440.* 



A123-00 Street Lights 
200 Operations 



28,000 



A125-00 Board of Health 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 



610. 

6,490. 

500. 



7,600, 



163 



A126-00 Public Health Nurse 



$ 2,575. 



A127-00 Garbage Disposal 
200 Operations 



18,000 



A128-00 Mental Health 
200 Operations 



6,400. 



A129-00 Ambulance 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 



$ 5,360. 

1,200. 

100. 



6,660.* 



A130-00 Sanitary Landfill 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 



11,766. 
14,589. 

11,100. 



37,455.* 



A131-00 Sewer 

A131-01 Sewer Operations 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

300 Supplies 



22,386, 

35,615, 

500, 



58,501. 



A132-00 Veterans 

A132-01 Veterans Operations 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

300 Supplies 

400 Benefits 



1,500. 

550. 

217. 

14,000. 



16,267, 



A132-02 Grave Markers 
200 Operations 



400. 



Total A132-01, 02 $16,667. 



A133-00 Memorial Day 
200 Operations 



500. 



A134-00 Council on Aging 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 



3,000. 
-0-. 



3,000.* 



Al 35-00 Library 
LOO Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
400 Credits 
500 Equipment 



22,583. 

14,047. 

1,174. 

(10,132.) 

-0-. 



27,672.* 



164 



100 Personnel 


$ 33,456. 




200 Operations 


53,487. 




300 Supplies 


1,855. 




400 New Services 


9,290. 


$ 98,088.* 


A145-00 Cemetery Commission 






100 Personnel 


12,000. 




200 Operations 


2,750. 




500 Equipment 


500. 


15,250. 


A146-00 Conservation Commission 






200 Operations 


1,130. 




300 Supplies 


55. 




400 Other Charges 


3,120. 





4,305 



A147-00 Development and Industrial Commission 
200 Operations 



75. 



A148-00 Historical Commission 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



-0-, 

400 



400, 



A150-00 Town Debt 

A150-01 Principal 

400 Other Charges 



512,625 



A150-02 Interest 
400 Other Charges 



260,000, 



Total A150-01, 02 $772,625 



A155-00 Insurance 
A155-01 Vehicles 
200 Operations 



6,380, 



A155-02 Workmen's Comp. 
200 Operations 



18,500 



A155-03 Property & Liability 
200 Operations 



21,400. 



A155-04 Group 
200 Operations 



76,464.* 



Total A155-01, 02, 03, 04 $122,744 



A160-00 Town Report 
200 Operations 



4,500.* 



165 



A161-00 County Retirement 
200 Other Charges $ 58,653, 

A162-00 Stabilization Fund 
400 Other Charges -0- 

A163-00 Reserve Fund 
400 Other Charges 44,000 

A170-00 Town Meetings 

100 Personnel $ 420. 

200 Operations 1.625. 

500 Equipment -0-. 



A171-00 Warrant Committee 
200 Operations 40. 
300 Supplies 37^ 



A175-00 Personnel Board 
100 Personnel 400. 

200 Operations 345. 



2,045 



77. 



745 



A180-00 Regional Vocational Technical 
High School 
200 Operations 52,730. 

1000-00 School Administration 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

2000-00 Instruction 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

3000-00 Other School Services 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 

4000-00 Plant Oper. & Maint. 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

6000-00 Community Services 
100 Personnel 

7000-00 Acquisition of Assets 
300 Supplies & Materials 

9000-00 Programs with other Systems 
400 Other Charges & Credits 



166 



Total 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, 7000, 9000 $4,144,232.* 



8000-01 Vocational Education 
400 Other Intergovernmental 

8000-02 Adult Education 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



-0-, 
1,600, 



$ 3,660. 



1,600. 



8000-03 School Planning & Building Committee 
100 Personnel 350, 

200 Operations 150, 

300 Supplies -0-, 

400 Other Charges -0-, 



500.* 

Total Article 3 Budget $6,422,898. 

* denotes a questioned budget 

All unquestioned budgets were passed on April 28, 1975. The meeting 
was then adjourned until April 29, 1975 at 7:30 p.m. at the Amos Clark 
Kingsbury High School. Line Items A100-03 thru A134-00 were acted 
upon on April 29, 1975. The meeting was then adjourned until May 5, 
1975 at the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School. 



Line Items A135-00 thru 8000-03 were acted upon on May 5, 1975, 
meeting was then adjourned until May 6, 1975 at the Amos Clark 
Kingsbury High School. 



The 



ARTICLE 


14 


ARTICLE 


15 


ARTICLE 


20 


ARTICLE 


28 


ARTICLE 


29 


ARTICLE 


32 


ARTICLE 


33 


ARTICLE 


37 


ARTICLE 


38 



SUMMARY OF OTHER APPROPRIATIONS 

Janes Ave. Construction 

High St. Construction 

Signals - North Meadow/Dale 

Paving rear of Town Hall 

Beautification of Front of Town Hall 

Recreation for physically and mentally 

handicapped. 

Baker's Pond 

Bicentennial Funds 

Historical Commission 

Total of other Appropriations 



7,000. 
10,000. 
20,000. 

6,000. 
12,000. 

2,615. 

65,425. 

9,000. 

1,500. 

133,540. 



167 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
May 6, 1975 



The meeting was called to order at 7:50 P.M. at the Amos Clark Kingsbury 
High School. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation 
of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1975 in accordance 
with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a 
note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or 
notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 4. Voted to authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1975 in accordance with 
the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a 
note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note 
or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector to use all means 
in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to that office. 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 5. Voted that the collector be authorized to use all means in 

the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if he was elected to that 

office. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensation of 
the following elected officers: Moderator; Town Clerk; Treasurer; Selectmen; 
Assessors; School Committee; Trustees of Public Library; Collector of Taxes; 
Planning Board; Park and Recreation Commissioners; Housing Authority. 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 6. Voted to fix the salary and compensation of the following 

elected officer as recommended: 

Moderator $ -0-. 

Town Clerk 3,000. 

Treasurer 4,400. 

Selectman, Chairman 675. 

Selectman, Clerk 650. 

Selectmen, 3rd Member 650. 

Assessor, Chairman 600. 

Assessor, Clerk 575. 

Assessor, 3rd Member 575. 

School Committee -0-. 

Library Trustees -0-. 

Tax Collector 4,400. 

168 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classification of 
Positions and Pay Schedule of the Personnel Administration Plan so that it 
reads as follows: 

FULL TIME POSITIONS 

Position Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

*Chief Annual 13,375 to 17,655 

Sergeant Annual 11,754 to 12,243 

Patrolman Annual 9,565 10,236 11,022 11,754 

STREETS, WATER AND SEWER DEPARTMENT 

*Supt. Annual 14,445 to 19,260 
Foreman Hourly 4.52 4.79 5.07 5.35 5.67 
Wastewater Treatment Plant: 

Oper. in Charge Hr. 4.24 4.52 4.79 5.07 5.35 
Operator Hourly 3.92 4.13 4.35 4.63 4.90 
Equip. Oper. 

Repairman Hourly 4.13 4.35 4.57 4.85 5.13 
Heavy Equip. 

Operator Hourly 
Water Tech. Hourly 
Lt. Equip. 

Operator Hourly 
Laborer Hourly 

Snow Removal Premium: 50 per cent of hourly rate for time worked other than 
normal schedule. 100 per cent of hourly rate for time worked on Sundays and 
Holidays. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

*Chief Annual 11,572 to 14,878 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 

*Exec. Sec. Annual 13,910 to 21,400 



3.92 


4.13 


4.35 


4.63 


4.90 


3.92 


4.13 


4.35 


4.63 


4.90 


3.69 


3.92 


4.13 


4.35 


4.63 


2.81 


2.92 


3.03 


3.20 


3.41 



Admin. Sec. Annual 


7,657 


8,081 


8,529 


9,001 


9,500 


Custodian: 












Town Hall Hourly 


2.59 


2.70 


2.81 


2.97 


3.15 


GENERAL 












Senior Sec. Hourly 


3.31 


3.53 


3.75 


3.97 


4.18 


Coll./Bkpr./ 












Sec. Hourly 


2.87 


3.03 


3.20 


3.36 


3.53 


Dog Officer Annual 


8,346 to 


9,095 









Full-time employees shall receive an annual longevity payment of $50. after 5 
years continuous full-time employment plus $10. for each additional year of 
service up to a total maximum of $200., payable on the 2nd pay day of 
December. 



169 



Position 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 
Custodian Hourly 
Town Hall 

PARK AND RECREATION 
Custodian: Hourly 
Recreation Center 



REGULAR PART TIME POSITIONS 
Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 



2.59 



2.59 



2.70 



2.70 



2.81 



2.81 



4th Step 



2.97 



Maximum 



3.15 



2.97 



3.15 



LIBRARY 














Librarian 


Annual 


6,194 


6,558 


6,877 


7,219 


7,715 


Asst. Libr. 


Annual 


3,196 


3,373 


3,565 


3,763 


3,968 


Children's 














Librarian 


Annual 


3,196 


3,373 


3,565 


3,763 


3,968 


GENERAL 














Coll./Bkpr. 


/ 












Sec. 


Hourly 


2.87 


3.03 


3.20 


3.36 


3.53 



TAX DEPARTMENT 
Deputy Coll. 
and Bkpr. Hourly 



2.92 



3.15 



3.31 



3.47 



* Indicates a salaried position not subject to overtime payment. 
PART TIME AND TEMPORARY POSITIONS 



3.75 



Position 



Rate 



Ambulance E.M.T: 
Attendant 
Serviceman 

Animal Inspector 

Beach :*Water Front Director 

*Asst. Water Front Director 

*Swimming Instructor 
*Lifeguard Instructor 

*Lifeguard 

Skating Program Director 
Skating Supervisor 
Building Inspector (Acting) 

Cemetery Foreman 
Clerk: Typist 
Deputy Collector 
Assistant Dog Officer 



$4.01 per hour 

$2.68 per run subject to $27. 

min. per month 
$460. per year 
$1,391 to $1,712 per year 
$ 86. to $ 112. per wk. , 

$749 min. per yr. 
$2.68 Per hour 
$2.14 to $2.57 per hr. , $642. 

min. 
$2.14 to $2.30 per hr. , $535. 

per yr. 
$4.17 per hour 
$3.64 per hour 
$6.63 per inspection, $171. 

min. per yr. 
$3.05 per hour 
$2.30 to $3.05 per hour 
Fee 
$214. per yr. and $3.75 per hr, 

when on duty 



170 



Fire: Call Firefighters 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 
Gas Inspector 

Gas Inspector (Acting) 

Laborer 

Laborer, Skilled 

Library: Aide 

Senior Aide 
Custodian & Maint. 

Playground Counselor 

Playground Director 

Plumbing Inspector 

Plumbing Inspector (Acting) 

Police Intern 

Police Matron 

Poll Worker 

Recreation Coordinator 

Registrar 

Registrar, Clerk 

Sanitation Inspector 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Secretary 

Special Police Officer 

Permanent Intermittent Police 

Town Accountant 

Town Counsel 

Traffic Supervisor 

Tree Warden/Insect Pest Control 

Tree Climber 

Truck Driver 

Veterans' Agent 

Wiring Inspector 

Wiring Inspector (Acting) 



$3.90 to $4.06 per hour *** 

$697. per year 

$234. per year 

$177. per year 

$177. per year 

$6.63 per inspection; $353. min. 

per year 
$6.63 per inspection; $64. min. 

per year 
$2.14 to $2.94 per hour 
$2.34 to $3.21 per hour 
$2.14 to $2.68 per hour 
$2.57 to $3.05 per hour 
$1659. to $2,349. per year 
$2.14 per hour 
$96. to $139 per week 
$6.63 per inspection; $1,049 

per year 
$6.63 per inspection; $241. per 

year 
$100. to $130. per week** 
$3.10 to $3.64 per hour 
$2.62 per hour 
$70. to $86. per week 
$134. per year 
$321. per year 
$4.01 per inspection 
$225. per year 
$2.62 to $3.32 per hour 
$4.01 per hour 
$4.01 per hour 
$3,745 per year 
$2,654 to $6,634 per year 
$3.10 to $3.64 per hour 
$4.92 per hour 
$2.89 to $4.60 per hour 
$2.68 to $3.96 per hour 
$1,500. per year 
$6.63 per inspection; $583. 

min. per year 
$6.63 per inspection; $171. 

min. per year 



When an hourly paid employee is called in to work on an emergency assignment 
he shall receive no less than two (2) hours pay at this straight time hourly 
rate. This does not apply to planned overtime. 

* Season is 10 weeks. 

** Police Intern will receive 7% improvement per successive year in the 

Intern Program. 
*** 1. All fireman responding to a call will receive a guaranteed minimum 

of 2 hours fire pay. 

2. Town employees responding as call firemen will receive 1 hour at 

their Town job rate for the first hour of the fire's duration. 



171 



3. Should the fire continue beyond the 1 hour, normal fire pay will 
apply for the duration of the fire. 

4. Between the hours of 12:00 midnight and 6:00 A.M. an additional 
premium hour will be guaranteed for all men who respond. This means that 
once a fire goes into the second hour an additional hour of pay will be 
added, i.e. 2 hours becomes 3, 3 hours becomes 4, etc. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 7. Voted to amend the Classification of Positions and Pay 

Schedule of the Personnel Administration Plan as printed in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administration 
Plan by adding to Section 15. Holidays 

Martin Luther King Day 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 8. Voted to amend the Personnel Administration Plan by adding 

to Section 15. Holidays - Martin Luther King Day. 

ARTICLE 9. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer from available funds to establish and maintain 
a back-up emergency ambulance service or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 9. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate sums of 
money for the purchase of equipment for the Street, Water, Sewer and 
Landfill departments as listed and authorize the Selectmen to trade as part 
of the purchase price or transfer to other town departments equipment to be 
replaced. 



To be Acquired 

1. Pickup Truck 1/2 ton 

2. Pickup Truck 3/4 ton 

Cabinet body 

3. Air Compressor 

4. Dump Truck 



Department 



Trade 



Street 


1970 Dodge Pickup 


Water 


1970 Chevrolet 


Street, Water 




& Sewer 


No trade (new) 


Street 


1966 White Dump Transfer 




to Landfill 



172 



To be Acquired Department Trade 

5. Pickup Truck with dump Body Street 1971 International Chassis 

6. Street Sweeper Street 1969 Wayne Sweeper 

7. Dozer Loader Landfill 1970 Cat 955 

8. Salt Spreader Street No trade (new) 



or do or act anything in relation thereto, 



(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 






VOTE: 

ARTICLE 10. Voted to transfer from the Stabilization Fund the sum of 
$53,670. for the purpose of purchasing the following equipment and to 
authorize the Selectmen to trade as part of the purchase price or 
transfer to other town departments the following equipment: 

$ 6,000. Pick up Truck - Street Department 

7,007. Pick up Truck - Water Department 

6,169. Air Compressor - Street, Water & Sewer Department 

30,894. Dump Truck - Street Department 

3,600. Salt Spreader - Street Department. 

Yes 246 
No 40 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Transportation 
Aid Account the sum of $27,976. received in accordance with Chapter 825 of 
the Acts of 1974 and to borrow the sum of $27,976. the Town's 1976 allotment 
from Chapter 765 of the Acts of 1972, and to borrow the sum of $4,026., the 
unexpended balance of the Town's allotment of Chapter 765 for the purpose 
of reconstructing North Street from Main Street northerly for a distance 
of approximately 1,600 feet (300' northerly of Green Street), and to 
authorize the Selectmen to enter into any and all contracts necessary or 
incidental thereto; said funds may be used in conjunction with any funds 
alloted by the County, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 11. Voted that the sum of $27,976. be transferred from the 
Transportation Aid Account received under Chapter 825 of the Acts of 
1974 and that the Treasurer be authorized to borrow the sum of $27,976 
with the approval of the Selectmen, the Town's 1976 allotment from 
Chapter 765 of the Acts of 1972, and that the Treasurer be authorized to 
borrow the sum of $4,026. with the Selectmen's approval, the unexpended 
balance of the Town's 1975 allotment of Chapter 765, for the purpose of 
reconstructing North Street from Main Street northerly for a distance of 
approximatley 1,600 feet to a point 300 feet northerly of Green Street; 
and that the Selectmen be authorized to acquire by eminent domain or 
otherwise such right, titles and easments including drainage easements 
and that the Selectmen be authorized to enter into any and all necessary 
contracts for that purpose; the funds appropriated under this article are 
to be used in conjunction with any funds alloted by the County. 

173 



Yes 287 
No 20 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
in the name and behalf of the Town of Medfield to remise and release to the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts through its Department of Public Works all 
right, title, claim and demand whatsoever as said Grantor has, or ought to 
have, in and to a certain Vehicular bridge being Bridge M-ll-7 and being 
identified as Railroad Bridge No. 38.15, said bridge being a continuation and 
extension of a public way known as Curve Street in the Town of Medfield 
providing Vehicular passage for the public over the tracks now or formerly 
of the Penn Central Railroad, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 12. Voted to authorize the Board of Selectmen in the name and 
in behalf of the Town of Medfield to remise and release to the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts through its Department of Public Works all 
right, title, claim and demand whatsoever as said Town of Medfield has, 
or ought to have, in and to a certain vehicular bridge being Bridge 
M-ll-7 and being identified as Railroad Bridge R.B. No. 38.15, said 
bridge being a continuation and extension of a public vehicular passage 
for the public over the tracks now or formerly of the Penn Central 
Railroad. The vote was unanimous. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$24,000. for the replacement of guard fences and posts on Main Street (Route 
109) between Bridge Street and the Millis town line, said appropriation to be 
offset by funds received in accordance with Chapter 497 of the Acts of 1971 
and to authorize the Selectmen to enter into any and all contracts necessary 
or incidental thereto, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 13. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the re- 
construction of Janes Avenue from North Street easterly for a distance of 
300 feet or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 14. Voted that the sum of $7,000. be raised and appropriated 
for the reconstruction of Janes Avenue from North Street easterly for 
a distance of 300 feet and that the Selectmen be authorized to enter 
into any and all contracts necessary for this purpose. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer from available funds the sum of $20,000. for the 



174 



purpose of resurfacing a section of High Street (Route 27) , said appropriation 
to be offset by funds received in accordance with Chapter 497 of the Acts 
of 1971 and to authorize the Selectmen to enter into any and all contracts 
necessary or incidental thereto; said funds may be used with any funds 
alloted by the County; or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 15. Voted that the sum of $10,000. be raised and appropriated 
for the purpose of resurfacing a section of High Street (Route 27) , 
said appropriation to be offset by funds received in accordance with 
Chapter 497 of the Acts of 1971: and that the Selectmen be authorized 
to enter into any and all necessary contracts for this purpose. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to 
appoint a Building Code Board of Appeals for the purpose of hearing appeals 
pertaining to a Building Inspector's actions in accord with the provisions 
contained in the State Building Code, Section 126.8 which became effective 
on January 1, 1975 said Board to consist of five (5) members, one member to 
be appointed for five (5) years, one member to be appointed for four (4) 
years, one member for three (3) years, one member for two (2) years, one 
member for one (1) year, and thereafter, each new member is to serve for 
five (5) years or until his successor has been appointed or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 16. Voted that the Selectmen be authorized to appoint a 
Building Code Board of Appeals for the purpose of hearing appeals per- 
taining to a Building Inspector's actions in accord with provisions 
contained in the State Building Code, Section 126.8 which became 
effective on January 1, 1975, said board to consist of five members, 
one member to be appointed for five years, one member to be appointed 
for four years, one member for three years, one member for two years 
and one member to serve for one year, and thereafter, each new member 
to serve for five years or until his successor has been appointed. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to appoint a committee of five or more persons to prepare plans and specifi- 
cations for construction of, and select a site for a facility for use as a 
Police Station said committee to include Police Chief and a member of the 
Warrant Committee, and to raise and appropriate and/or transfer from 
available funds a sum of money for the purposes of this article, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Police Department) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 17. Voted to authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint a 
committee of five persons to prepare plans and specifications for 
construction of, and select a site for a facility for use as a police 
station, said committee to include the police chief and a member of 

175 



the warrant committee. 

ARTICLE 18. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/ 
or borrow and/or transfer from available funds for the purpose of purchasing 
a new 1,000 gallons per minute Class A Pumper for the Fire Department, and 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to trade or sell a 1941 Ford 500 gallon 
per minute Pumper for part of the purchase price, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Fire Department) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 18. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 19. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds for the 
purpose of installing traffic and pedestrian control signals at the 
intersection of North Meadows Road and West Street, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 19. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 20 . To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds for the pur- 
pose of installing traffic and pedestrian control signals at the inter- 
section of North Meadows Road and Dale Street, or take any action relative 

thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 20. Voted that the sum of $20,000. be raised and appropriate 
for the purpose of installing traffic and pedestrian control signals 
at the intersection of North Meadows Road and Dale Street. 

ARTICLE 21. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds to install a 
1 million gallon standpipe on Mt. Nebo, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Water & Sewer Board) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 21. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 22. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer from available funds to install a 12 inch water 
main from Main Street in a right of way to Bow Street, in Bow Street, 
Hillcrest Road, and Rolling Lane to a parcel of land owned by the Town on 
Mt . Nebo, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewer Board) 

176 



VOTE: 

ARTICLE 22. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 23. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds to install a 12 
inch water main from Foundry Street via Philip Street and in a right of way 
to the standpipe on Mt. Nebo, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewer Board) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 23. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 24. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds to extend the 12 
inch water main in Rocky Lane, approximately 2300 feet, to the 8 inch main 
in Granite Street, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewer Board) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 24. Voted that the sum of $50,920. be appropriate to be used 
with $20,000. contributed by Calvin Colwell to extend the 12 inch water 
main in Rocky Lane, approximately 2300 feet to the 8 inch main in Granite 
Street, and that to meet this appropriation $11,500. be transferred from 
the balance of the funds appropriated pursuant to Article 9 of the 1974 
Annual Town Meeting and the sum of $39,420. be transferred from the 
Stabilization Fund; that the Water & Sewer Board be authorized to enter 
into all necessary contracts for the purposes of this article; and that 
the Board of Selectmen be authorized to acquire by eminent domain or 
otherwise such rights, titles and easements as may be necessary for the 
purposes of this article. 

Yes 160 
No 61 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:45 p.m. 

It was voted to reconvene on May 12, 1975 at the Dale Street School 

Auditorium at 7:30 P.M. 



Nancy J. VizAton 
Town Clerk 



177 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
May 12, 1975 



After ascertaining that a quorum was present 

The meeting was called to order at 7:30 P.M. and adjourned until after the 
remainder of the Special Town Meeting was acted upon. The meeting was 
reconvened at 8:00 P.M. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the con- 
struction of street sewers in: 

Longmeadow Road 
Spring Valley Road 
Woodfall Road 
Stonybrook Road 
Evergreen Way 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewer Board) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 25. Voted to appropriate the sum of $46,000. for final plans 
including construction plans for the street sewers in Longmeadow Road, 
Spring Valley Road, Woodfall Road, Stonybrook Road and Evergreen Way; 
and the Treasurer be authorized to borrow the sum of $46,000. with the 
approval of the Selectmen; and that the Water and Sewer Board be 
authorized to enter into all necessary contracts for the purposes of 
this article. The vote was unanimous. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for preparing of 
final plans including construction plans for interceptors for the sewer 
system, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewer Board) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 26. Voted that the sum of $124,000. be appropriated for 
preparing final plans, including construction plans, for interceptors 
and street sewers for the Town's sewer system; that to meet this 
appropriation the Treasurer be authorized to borrow the sum of $124,000. 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen; and that the Water and 
Sewer Board be authorized to enter into any contracts necessary for the 
purposes of this article and to apply for and receive any federal, state 
or other funds in reimbursement. The vote was unanimous. 

RESOLUTION- Moved that it be resolved that no expenditure shall be made 
under this article until reimbursement funds have been 
committed. 



178 



ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 
475 of the Acts of 1974 so that Traffic Supervisors may be eligible to join 
the Norfolk County Retirement System or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 27. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 28. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or borrow for the purpose of planning and constructing a 
public parking area and appurtenances on property owned by the Town located 
at the rear of the Town Hall or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Development & Industrial Coi ission) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 28. Voted that the sum of $6,000. be raised and appropriated 
for the purpose of planning and constructing a public parking area and 
appurtenances on property owned by the Town located at the rear of the 
Town Hall and that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to enter into 
any and all contracts necessary for the purposes of this article. 

ARTICLE 29. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, and/or borrow for the purpose of redesigning, reconstructing 
and beautifying the area owned by the Town located in front of the Town Hall 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Development & Industrial Commission) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 29. Voted that the sum of $12,000. be raised and appropriated 
for the purpose of redesigning, reconstructing and beautifying the area 
owned by the Town located in front of Town Hall; and that the Board of 
Selectmen be authorized to enter into any and all contracts necessary 
for the purposes of this article; and that the Board of Selectmen be 
authorized to apply for and receive any federal, state or other funds 
available for reimbursement. 

RESOLUTION - No funds are to be spent unless 50% reimbursement is 

received from the Massachusetts Bicentennial Commission. 

ARTICLE 30. To hear and act on the reports of any special committee 
appointed at any previous Special Town Meeting or Annual Town Meeting or 
appointed by the Moderator or Selectmen as authorized by the vote of the 
Town. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: 

RESOLUTION : 
RESOLVED: 

179 



WHEREAS, the town of Medfield is annually required to raise funds on the 
property tax for support of state enacted programs, and; 

WHEREAS, the town of Medfield does not receive its full entitlement 
under most state aid categories, and; 

WHEREAS, the burden to raise all these funds fall squarely on the tax- 
payers of the town of Medfield, and; 

WHEREAS, only a small amount of revenue from the state is received in 
the town of Medfield for municipal services not related to education, 
and; 

WHEREAS, the property taxpayers of the town of Medfield can not longer 
afford to carry the heaviest burden of taxation on the local taxes; 

NOWTHEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the voters of the town of Medfield do 
hereby call upon their legislators and the other members of the General 
Court along with the governor to vote in favor of a program of 
municipal aid and additional educational aid during this legislative 
session and to redistribute the tax burden through use of the less 
regressive forms of taxes available at the state level, such as sales 
and/or income tax. 

Passed by a vote of The Inhabitants of the Town of Medfield during the 
annual town meeting of the town of Medfield on May 12, 1975. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the 
following named streets, or parts thereof: 

Carmen Circle Station 0+0 to Station 9+16.20 

Eastmount Road Station 2+50 to Station 6+63.96 

Evergreen Way Station 13+40.05 to Station 29.10.63 

Fieldstone Drive Station 0+60 to Station 1+51.59 

Grace Drive Station 0+0 to Station 10+15 

Indian Hill Road Station 14+00 to Station 38+00 

Lee Road Station 13+24.12 to Station 14+90 

Longmeadow Road Station 10+65.77 to Station 21.66.46 

Nauset Street Station 0+0 to Station 13+55.43 

Oxbow Road Station 1+97.43 to Station 6+17.4 

Ridge Road Station 11+15.35 to Station 18+73.62 

Springvalley Road Station 0+25 to Station 11+11.44 

Steven Lane Station 0+0 to Station 8+84.84 

Surrey Run Station 25+67.34 to Station 28+83.30 

The Paddock Lane Station 21+32.00 to Station 25+19.46 

Wilson Street Station 0+25.00 to Station 4+29.81 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to in 
the Orders of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such 
rights, titles and easements, including drainage easements as may be 
necessary to accomplish such purposes, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

180 



VOTE: 

ARTICLE 31. Voted to accept as public ways the street as printed in 

the warrant. The vote was unanimous. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purpose of providing 
recreation for the physically and mentally handicapped or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 32. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,615. for the 

purpose of recreation for the physically and mentally handicapped. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow a sum of money for the repair, improvement and beaut if icat ion of 
Bakers Pond, also known as Meeting House Pond, and adjacent area, said funds 
may be used with any State, Federal or other funds that may be available and 
to authorize the Park and Recreation Commission to apply for and receive any 
such funds, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commission) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 33. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of $65,425. for the 
repair, improvement and beautification of; while retaining the present 
and historical boundaries; Bakers Pond, also known as Meeting House 
Pond, and adjacent area, said funds to be used with any state, federal 
or other funds that may be made available; and that the Park and 
Recreation Commission be authorized to apply for and receive any such 
funds. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
transfer from available funds and/or borrow a sum of money for the purpose 
of recreational development at Metacomet Park and to authorize the Park and 
Recreation Commission to apply for and receive any Federal and State funds 
which may be available for this purpose, and do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commission) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 34. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
transfer from available funds and/or borrow a sum of money for the purpose 
of recreation development of Cpl. Stephen Hinkley Memorial Park, and to 
authorize the Park and Recreation Commission to apply for and receive any 
Federal and State funds which may be available for this purpose, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commission) 



181 



VOTE: 

ARTICLE 35. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
transfer from available funds and/or borrow a sum of money for the purpose of 
recreational facilities at the Hospital Road 56-acre site, and to authorize 
the Park and Recreation Commission to apply for and receive any Federal and 
State funds which may be available for this purpose, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commission) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 36. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purpose of 
celebrating the 325th. anniversary of the Incorporation of the Town of 
Medfield in 1976 and to celebrate the Bicentennial of our Country, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

(325th. Anniversary and Special Bicentennial Committee) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 37. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of $9,000. for the 
purpose of celebrating the 325th. anniversary of the incorporation of the 
Town of Medfield in 1976 and to celebrate the Nation's Bicentennial of 
our country. The vote was unanimous. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate Three 
Thousand Dollars ($3,000) to be disbursed by the Historical Commission as 
matching funds for the republication of William S. Tilden's History of 
Medfield , said money to be expended only in the event that an equal amount is 
raised for the same purpose by the Historical Society from other sources and 
that the Historical Society enter into an agreement that the Town is to be 
reimbursed to the extent of Three Thousand Dollars ($3,000) from the first 
proceeds derived from the sale of the books after payment of publication 
costs, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Historical Commission) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 38. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,500. to be 
disbursed by the Historical Commission as matching funds for the 
republication of William S. Tilden's History of Medfield , said money 
to be expended only in the event that an equal amount is raised for the 
same purpose by the Historical Society from other sources and that the 
Historical Society enter an agreement that the Town is to be reimbursed 
to the extent of $1,500. from the first proceeds derived from the sale 
of the books after payment of publication costs. 



182 



ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following Regulations: 
REGULATIONS RELATIVE TO SEWER ASSESSMENTS 



1. The following regulations shall apply to all extensions since 
January, 1970 of the common sanitary sewer system at the expense of 
the Town, and to the entry of "particular" sewers into the common 
sewer system, except when a variance from these regulations to 
apply to a specific project is voted at any Town Meeting. 

2. The owners of the land on both sides of the street benefited by any 
street sewer extension or installation in a public way shall be 
assessed a total of not more than 50% of the total cost thereof. No 
assessment shall be made for sewer lines not in a public way, but a 
connection charge shall be made in accordance with paragraph 6 below 
when applicable. Assessments shall be in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Sections 14 to 24 inclusive of Chapter 83 of the General 
Laws, and any Special Acts that pertain to Medfield. 

2. (a) Street sewers cost shall be limited to the following items: 
8" pipe including excavation and associated costs 
Y branches 
House connections 
Chimneys 
Manholes 

Drop Connections 
Stubs 
Pavement 
Police 
Clean-up 
Calcium 
Engineering 

as these pertain exclusively to a street sewer project, 
and as defined in the Town Meeting article that authorizes 
the project. 

3. Assessments shall be apportioned 50% based on the uniform unit 
method as defined by the General Court, and 50% on actual linear 
foot frontage. 

4. There shall be no double or overlapping assessments; a corner lot 
which can be drained into a common sewer on one street shall be 
exempted in assessing for the second street to the extent that all 
or a portion of the lot is not benefited. At the end of a common 
sewer extension, all lots which can be served shall be fully 
assessed, except that no assessment shall be made beyond a line 120 
feet from the last manhole. Exemption from assessments shall be 
made for property owned by the Town and for rights of way deeded 
and dedicated to public use. No land shall be assessed which by 
reason of its grade or other cause cannot be drained into the sewer. 
These exemptions shall not act to increase the assessments on 



183 



property not exempted. 

5. Assessments shall become liens on the lands benefited, which liens 
shall be filed in the Registry of Deeds. With respect to land not 
built upon, or not yet connected to the common sewer system, the 
time allowed for payment of the assessment together with interest 
at 5 per annum (increased to 5% per annum in accordance with 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 80, Section 13) shall be 
extended to a date 3 months after the land is built upon or 
connected, but in no case for more than 10 years. For the purpose 
of these regulations "land not built upon" shall include any lot 
or area in one ownership which is suitable for building purposes 
under the Zoning Bylaw, and which is set aside from any other land 
in the same ownership which is built upon by definite boundaries 
as shown on a plan or in a description filed with the Water and 
Sewerage Board within 60 days after the sewer line is available 
for service. 

6. The total cost of laying and connecting an individual or 
"particular" sewer to the common sewer system shall in every case 
be borne by the property owner. In addition, when property not 
abutting on a public way, or not previously assessed for any 
reason becomes connected to a common sewer line installed by the 
Town, a Connection Charge shall be made in lieu of an assessment 
as determined under Paragraph 3 above for the most recent common 
sewer extension installed by the Town; frontage to be based on 
sewer extension installed by the Town; frontage to be based on 
zoning then in effect in the district where the property lies. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 39. Voted to adopt the following Regulations as amended: 

REGULATION RELATIVE TO SEWER ASSESSMENTS 

1. The following regulations shall apply to all extensions since 
January, 1970 of the common sanitary sewer system at the ex- 
pense of the Town, and to the entry of "particular" sewers into 
the common sewer system, except when a variance from these 
regulations to apply toa specific project is voted at any Town 
Meeting. 

2. The owners of the land on both sides of the street benefited by 
any street sewer extension or installation in a public way shall be 
assessed a total of not more than 50% of the total cost OF STREET 
SEWERS AS LIMITED THEREIN. No assessment shall be made for sewer 
lines not in a public way, but a connection charge shall be made 

in accordance with paragraph 6 below when applicable. Assessments 
shall be in accordance with the provisions of Sections 14 to 24 
inclusive of Chapter 83 of the General Laws, and any Special Acts 
that pertain to Medfield. 

184 



2. (a) Street sewers cost shall be limited to the following items: 

8" pipe including excavation and EXCLUDING LEDGE 

REMOVAL 
Y branches House Connections 

Chimneys Manholes 

Drop Connections Stubs 

Pavement Police 

Clean-up Calcium 

Engineering 
as these pertain exclusively to a street sewer project, and 
as defined in the Town Meeting article that authorized the 
project. 

3. Assessments shall be apportioned 50% based on the uniform 
unit method as defined by the General Court, and 50% on actual 
linear foot frontage. 

4. There shall be no double or overlapping assessments; a corner 
lot which can be drained into a common sewer on one street shall 
be exempted in assessing for the second street to the extent 
that all or a portion of the lot is not benefited. CORNER LOT 
FRONTAGE SHALL BE THE PROJECTION OF SIDE LOT LINES TO THE FRONT 
LINES. FRONTAGE SHALL BE TAKEN ON THE STREET WHICH CONNECTION 
IS TO BE MADE. At the end of a common sewer extension, all 
lots which can be served shall be fully assessed, except that 

no assessment shall be made beyond a line 120 feet from the 
last manhole. Exemptions from assessments shall be made for 
property owned by the Town and for rights of way deeded and 
dedicated to public use. No land shall be assessed which by 
reason of its grade or other cause cannot be drained into the 
sewer. These exemptions shall not act to increase the 
assessments on property not exempted. 

5. Assessments shall become liens on the lands benefited, which 
liens shall be filed in the Registry of Deeds. With respect 
to land not built upon, or not yet connected to the common 
sewer system, the time allowed for payment of the assessment 
together with interest at 5% per annum (increased to 5% per 
annum in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 80, 
Section 13) shall be extended to a date 3 months after the land 
is built upon or connected, but in no case for more than 10 
years. For the purpose of these regulation "land not built 
upon" shall include any lot or area in one ownership which is 
suitable for building purposes under the Zoning Bylaw, and 
which is set aside from any other land in the same ownership 
which is built upon by definite boundaries as shown on a plan 
or in a description filed with the Water and Sewerage Board 
within 60 days after the sewer line is available for service. 



185 



6. The total cost of laying and connecting an individual or 

"particular" sewer to the common sewer system shall in every 
case be borne by the property owner. In addition, when 
property not abutting on a public way, or not previously 
assessed for any reason becomes connected to a common sewer line 
installed by the Town, a Connection Charge shall be made in lieu 
of an assessment. This Connection Charge shall be equal in 
amount to the minimum assessment as determined under PARAGRAPH 
1, 2, 2(a), AND 3 above for the most recent common sewer 
extension installed by the Town; frontage AND UNITS to be based 
on zoning then in effect in the district where the property 
lies. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to approve Wight Street and Farm 
Street as scenic roads, or take any action related thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 40. Voted to approve Wight Street as a scenic road. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the use of the 
Board of Assessors for the purpose of revaluing all real and personal 
property within the Town of Medfield, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 41. Voted to dismiss this article to raise and appropriate and/ 
or borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the 
use of the Board of Assessors for the purpose of revaluing all real and 
personal property within the Town of Medfield. 

Note: Roger E. Hardy, Joseph S. Kennedy, Melvin Mills, members of 
the Board of Assessors all spoke in favor of this article. 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Assessors 
to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the 
Tax Rate, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 42. Voted to authorize the Board of Assessors to use the sum 
of $355,000. from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the 
Tax Rate. 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw and the 
Zoning Map of the Town of Medfield by removing the premises hereinafter 
described from the RU-Residential Urban District and placing the same in the 
B-Business District. 



186 



Two certain parcels of adjoining land, with the buildings thereon, 
situated on the Northeasterly side of Frairy Street, in Medfield, 
Norfolk County, Massachusetts and together bounded and described as 
follows : 

SOUTHWESTERLY by Frairy Street, 169.75 feet; 

NORTHWESTERLY by Cottage Street, on two courses measuring 40.65 feet 
and 103.12 feet, respectively; 

NORTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of Old Colony Railroad Company 
174.00 feet; and 

SOUTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of Anthony DeFrancisco, 117.39 

feet. Said premises contain 23,024 square feet of land, 
more or less and are shown as lot A. and lot B. on a 
certain plan recorded with Norfolk County Registry of 
Deeds as Plan No. 1061 of 1948 in Book 2794, Page 524. 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 43. Voted to amend the Zoning Bylaw and the Zoning Map of the 

Town of Medfield by removing the premises hereinafter described from 

the RU-Residential Urban District and placing the same in the B-Business 

District. 

Two certain parcels of adjoining land, with the buildings thereon, 
situated on the Northeasterly side of Frairy Street, in Medfield, 
Norfolk County, Massachusetts and together bounded and described 
as follows: 

SOUTHWESTERLY by Frairy Street, 169.75 feet; 

NORTHWESTERLY by Cottage Street, on two courses measuring 40.65 feet 
and 103.12 feet, respectively; 

NORTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of Old Colony Railroad Company, 
174.00 feet; and 

SOUTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of Anthony DeFrancisco, 117.39 

feet. Said premises contain 23,024 square feet of land, 
more or less and are shown as lot A. and lot B. on a 
certain plan recorded with Norfolk County Registry of 
Deeds as Plan No. 1061 of 1948 in Book 2794, Page 524. 



VOTE: 



Yes 
No 



309 
2 



ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw and the 
Zoning Map of the Town of Medfield by removing the premises hereinafter 
described from the RU-Residential Urban District and placing the same in the 
B-Business District. 

That certain parcel of vacant land situated on the Westerly side of 
Frairy Street, in Medfield, Norfolk County, Massachusetts and being 
bounded and described as follows: 



187 



EASTERLY by Frairy Street, 150.00 feet; 

SOUTHERLY by land now or formerly of Belmont, indicated on the plan 

hereinafter referred to, 161.8 feet; 
WESTERLY by land now or formerly of Robert R. Palson, indicated on 

said plan, 120.00 feet; and 
NORTHERLY by Lot 8, shown on said plan, 172.1 feet. 

Said premises contain 21,900 square feet of land and are shown as Lot 9 
and Lot 10 on a certain plan recorded with Norfolk County Registry of 
Deeds as Plan No. 522 of 1952 in Book 3084, Page 179. 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 44. Voted to dismiss this article to amend the Zoning Bylaw and 
the Zoning Map of the Town of Medfield by removing the premises 
hereinafter described from the RU-Residential Urban District and placing 
the same in the B-Business District. 

That certain parcel of vacant land situated on the Westerly side of 
Frairy Street, in Medfield, Norfolk County, Massachusetts and 
being bounded and described as follows: 

EASTERLY by Frairy Street, 150 feet; 

SOUTHERLY by land now or formerly of Belmont, indicated on the plan 

hereinafter referred to, 161.8 feet; 
WESTERLY by land now or formerly of Robert R. Palson, indicated on 

said plan, 120.00 feet; and 
NORTHERLY by Lot 8, shown on said plan, 172.1 feet. 

Said premises contain 21,900 square feet of land and are shown as Lot 9 
and Lot 10 on a certain plan recorded with Norfolk County Registry of 
Deeds as Plan No. 522 of 1952 in Book 3084, Page 179. 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to repeal the Dog Control Bylaw 
(Leash Law) adopted by the Town under Article 18 of the Warrant for the 1974 
Annual Town Meeting, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen for the Petitioners) 

VOTE: 

ARTICLE 45. Voted to dismiss this article to repeal the Dog Control 
Bylaw (Lease Law) adopted by the Town under Article 18 of the Warrant 
for the 1974 Annual Town Meeting. 

Reconsideration of A120-00 500 equipment failed. 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Moderator to 
appoint a committee of Five (5) members and authorize it to make arrangements 
and to spend money appropriated under Article 3 for the observance of 
Memorial Day, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



188 



VOTE: 

ARTICLE 46. Voted to authorize the Moderator to appoint a committee of 
Five (5) members and authorize it to make arrangements and to spend 
money appropriated under Article 3 for the observance of Memorial Day. 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named sums 
as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the 
interest thereof or as may be necessary for said care, viz: 

Joseph and Hope Burke Lot $500.00 

Walter and Evelyn Reynolds Lot 600.00 

Rebel Palumbo Lot 100.00 

Sadie Mafusie Lot 600.00 

Ralph Parmigiane Lot 100.00 

Joseph DiMezza Lot 300.00 

Joel Goldthwait Lot 600.00 

Frank Simonetti Lot 200.00 

Robert H. Finn Lot 400.00 

Richard Smallwood Lot 50.00 

William Bartlett Lot 200.00 

Thomas Copithorne Lot 120.00 

Ronald and Margaret Curry Lot 400.00 

Richard Tomney Lot 800.00 

Emilio DeFlumero Lot 200.00 

George and Lillian Paraschos Lot 200.00 

Mabel Maguire Lot 200.00 

John J. Norton Lot 100.00 

Francis X. Linse Lot 400.00 

Jaquin Pires Lot 100.00 

Burgess Standley Lot 500.00 

Patrick Connolly Lot 400.00 

Donald and Marion Inman Lot 200.00 

Romolo DeVenanzi Lot 400.00 



VOTE: 

ARTICLE 47. Voted to accept the following named sums as Perpetual 

Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the interest 
thereof or as may be necessary for said care, viz: 

Joseph and Hope Burke Lot $500.00 

Walter and Evelyn Reynolds Lot 600.00 

Rebel Palumbo Lot 100.00 

Sadie Mafusie Lot 600.00 

Ralph Parmigiane Lot 100.00 

Joseph DiMezza Lot 300.00 

Joel Goldthwait Lot 600.00 

Frank Simonetti Lot 200.00 

Robert H. Finn Lot 400.00 

Richard Smallwood Lot 50.00 

William Bartlett Lot 200.00 

Thomas Copithorne Lot 120.00 

Ronald and Margaret Curry Lot 400.00 



189 



Richard Tomney Lot $800.00 

Emilio DeFlumero Lot 200.00 

George and Lillian Paraschos Lot 200.00 

Mabel Maguire Lot 200.00 

John J. Norton Lot 100.00 

Francis X. Linse Lot 400.00 

Jaquin Pires Lot 100.00 

Burgess Standley Lot 500.00 

Patrick Connolly Lot 400.00 

Donald and Marion Inman Lot 200.00 

Romolo DeVenanzi Lot 400.00 

The meeting was dissolved at 10:35 p.m. 



A true copy attest 



Nancy J. PieAton 
Town Clerk 



190 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
TOWN WARRANT 



April 28, 1975 



NORFOLK ss. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County 
greetings : 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in election and in 
town affairs, to meet at the Amos Clark Kingsbury School Gymnasium in said 
Medfield on Monday the 28th day of April A.D. at 8:00 p.m. then and there 
to act on the following articles: 

The meeting was called to order at 8:00 p.m. by the Moderator Ralph C. 
Copeland after ascertaining that a quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to substitute the following for the 
existing Zoning Bylaw, upon approval of the Attorney General: 



ZONING BYLAW 

for the 

Town of Medfield, Massachusetts 

SECTION 1 

SCOPE 

1.1 TITLE 

This Bylaw shall be known and may be cited as the Zoning Bylaw for 
the Town of Medfield , Massachusetts , which herein is called "this 
Bylaw." 

.2 AUTHORITY 

This Bylaw is adopted by virtue of and pursuant to the authority 
granted to the Town of Medfield by Chapter 40A of the General Laws 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as now existing or hereafter 
amended herein called the Zoning Enabling Act . 



191 



1.3 



PURPOSE 



To promote the health, safety, convenience and welfare of the 
inhabitants of Medfield by lessening congestion in the streets; 
securing safety from fires, panic, or other danger; providing 
adequate light and air; preventing the overcrowding of land; 
avoiding undue congestion of population; facilitating the adequate 
provision of transportation, water, sewerage, schools, parks, and 
other public requirements; and by other means in accordance with a 
comprehensive Master Plan prepared during the years 1963 and 1964 
and since continuously updated. 

SECTION 2 

DEFINITIONS 

2.1 For the purpose of this Bylaw, certain terms and words shall have the 
meaning given herein. Words used in the present tense include the 
future. The singular number includes the plural, and the plural 
the singular. The words used or occupied include the words 
designed , arranged , intended or offered to be used or occupied. The 
words building , structure , lot , land or premises shall be construed 
as though followed by the words "or any portion thereof." The word 
shall is always mandatory and not merely directory. 

Terms and words not defined herein but defined in The Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts State Building Code shall have the meanings given 
therein unless a contrary intention clearly appears. Words not 
defined in either place shall have the meaning given in Webster's 
Unabridged Dictionary , Third Edition . Uses listed in the Table of 
Use Regulations under the classes Retail and Service Trades and 
Wholesale Trade and Manufacturing shall be further defined by the 
Standard Industrial Classification Manual published by the U. S. 
Bureau of the Census. 



2.1.1 



ABANDONMENT 



The discontinuance of a nonconforming use or 
the visable or otherwise apparent intention of 
an owner to discontinue a nonconforming use of 
a building or premises, or the removal of the 
characteristic equipment or furnishing used in 
the performance of the nonconforming use, 
without its replacement by similar equipment or 
furnishings, or the replacement of the non- 
conforming use or building by a conforming use 
or building. 



2.1.2 ALTERATION 



Any construction, reconstruction or other 
action resulting in a change in the structural 
parts or height, number of stories, size, use 
or location of a building or other structure. 



2.1.3 AUTOMOTIVE GRAVEYARD or JUNKYARD - A collection of two or more un- 
registered vehicles on any lot or parcel 
under single ownership. In order to be con- 



192 



sidered unregistered, vehicles must be of a 
sort which in their normal use would be re- 
quired to be registered by the Registry of 
Motor Vehicles of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. 



2.1.4 BOARD 



The Board of Appeals of the Town of Medfield 
Massachusetts. 



2.1.5 



BUILDING 



- A combination of any materials, whether 

portable or fixed, having a roof, common walls, 
passageways, areas and serviced by common 
utilities and forming a structure for the 
shelter of persons, animals or property. For 
the purposes of this definition "roof" shall 
include an awning or any simialr covering, 
whether or not permanent in nature. 



2.1,6 BUILDING, ACCESSORY 



A detached subordinate building, the use of 
which is customarily incidental and subor- 
dinate to that of the principal building, and 
which is located on the same lot as that 
occupied by the principal building. 



2.1,7 COMMUNITY FACILITIES 



Premises owned and operated by a governmental 
or other chartered nonprofit organization, 
including Public Housing for the Elderly, but 
not including fraternal, sports or similar 
membership organizations. 



1.8 DRIVEWAY, 



LEGAL SERVICE - An open space, located on a private lot which 
is not more than 24 feet in width built for 
access to a private garage or off-street 
parking space. 



2.1.9 DRIVE-IN ESTABLISHMENT 



• A premise in which persons while in cars are 
served, view, purchase, consume as appropriate; 
food, movies, goods, materials or equipment. 



2.1.10 DWELLING, MULTI-FAMILY 



• A building containing three or more dwelling 
units . 



A dwelling building containing three or more 
attached one-family dwelling units each with 
its own entrance and exit. 



2.1.12 DWELLING UNIT 



One or more living or sleeping rooms arranged 
for the use of one or more individuals living 
as a single housekeeping unit, with cooking, 
living, sanitary and sleeping facilities. 



193 



.1.13 ESSENTIAL SERVICES 



The erection, construction, alteration or 
maintenance by public utilities or governmental 
agencies of underground or overhead gas, 
electrical, steam or water transmission or 
distribution systems, collection, communica- 
tion, supply, or disposal system, including 
poles, wires, mains, drains, sewers, pipes, 
conduits, cables, fire alarm boxes, police 
call boxes, traffic signals, hydrants and 
other similar equipment and accessories in 
connection therewith but not including 
buildings necessary for the furnishing of 
adequate service by such public utilities 
or governmental agencies for the public health 
or safety or general welfare. 



1.14 FAMILY 



One or more persons, including domestic 
employees, occupying a dwelling unit and 
living as a single, nonprofit housekeeping 
unit. 



2.1.15 FLOOD PLAIN DISTRICT - (See Section 10.2) 



2.1.16 FLOOR AREA, NET 



The sum of the areas of the several floors of 
a building, measured from the exterior faces 
of the walls. It does not include cellars, 
unenclosed porches, or attics not used for 
human occupancy or any floor space in acces- 
sory buildings or in the main building in- 
tended and designed for the parking of motor 
vehicles in order to meet the parking re- 
quirements of this Bylaw, or any such floor 
space intended and designed for accessory 
heating and ventilating equipment. 



2.1.17 FLOOR AREA RATIO 

(F.A.R.) 

2.1.18 FRONTAGE 



The ratio of the net floor area of the prin- 
cipal building to the total lot area. 

The length of the boundary line dividing a 
lot from the right of way of the street on 
which it bounds. This is to be measured at 
the right-of-way boundary and not at the 
centerline of the street. 



2.1.19 HEIGHT 



The vertical distance from the adjacent ground 
to the top of the structure. 



194 



2.1.20 HOME OCCUPATION 



An accessory use which by custom has been 
carried on entirely within and only by the 
occupants of a dwelling unit, which use is 
incidental and subordinate to the dwelling 
use, and which does not in any manner change 
the residential character of the building. 



2.1.21 LOADING SPACE 



An off-street space used for loading or un- 
loading and which is not less than 14 feet in 
width, 45 feet in length and 14 feet in height 
and containing not less than 1300 square feet, 
including both access and maneuvering area. 



2.1.22 LODGING UNIT 



2.1.23 Lot 



One or more rooms contained in a lodging house 
for the use of one or more individuals not 
living as a single housekeeping unit and not 
having cooking facilities. A "Lodging Unit" 
shall include a boarding unit, tourist house 
unit, or a rooming unit. 

An area or parcel of land in the same owner- 
ship, or any part thereof designated by its 
owner or owners as a separate lot. A parcel 
shall not be designated a lot unless it con- 
forms with the Table of Use Regulations, 
Section 6.2. An owner shall retain the right to 
alienate any parcel or portion of any parcel re- 
gardless of whether or not it is a legal lot 
under this Bylaw. For purposes of this Bylaw, a 
lot may or may not have boundaries identical 
with those recorded in the Norfolk County Regis- 
try of Deeds. 



2.1.24 Lot, Corner 



A lot at the point of intersection of and abut- 
ting on two or more intersecting streets, 
the angle of intersection of the street lot line, 
or in case of a curved street extended lot lines, 
being not more than 135 degrees. 



2.1.25 Lot Depth 



The mean horizontal distance between the front 
lot line and the rear lot line. 



2.1.26 Lot Line, Front 



The property line dividing a lot from a street. 
On a corner lot only one street line shall be 
considered the front line, except in those cases 
where the latest deed restrictions specify an- 
other line as the front lot line. 



2.1.27 Lot Line, Rear 



The lot line opposite the front lot line, ex- 
cept in the case of a corner lot the owner shall 
have the option of choosing which of the two 
lot lines which are not street lines is to be 
considered the rear lot line. 



2.1.29 Lot, Nonconforming 



Any lot line not a front or rear lot line. 

A lot lawfully existing at the effective date of 



195 



this Bylaw, or any amendment thereto, which is 
not in conformity with all provisions of this 
Bylaw. 



2.1.30 Lot, Through 



An interior lot, the front and rear lot lines of 
which abut streets, or a corner lot two opposite 
lines of which abut streets. 



2.1.31 Lot Width 



The horizontal distance between the side lot 
lines as measured at the required front yard 
depth which may or may not coincide with the 
actual front setback line. 



2.1.32 Membership Club 



A nonprofit social, sports or fraternal associa- 
tion or organization maintaining a building or 
facilities which are used exclusively by members 
and their guests and which may or may not contain 
bar facilities. 



2.1.33 Owner 



The duly authorized agent, attorney, purchaser, 
devisee, trustee or any person having vested or 
equitable interest in the use, structure or lot 
in question. 



2.1.34 Parking Space 



An off-street space having an area of not less 
than 200 square feet, plus access and maneuver- 
ing space, for exclusive use as a parking stall 
for one motor vehicle whether inside or outside a 
structure. 



2.1.35 Person 



The word "person" shall include one or more in- 
dividuals, a partnership, an association and a 
corporation. 



2.1.36 Recorded 



Recorded in the Norfolk Registry of Deeds or 
registered in the Norfolk Registry District of 
the Land Court . 



2.1.37 Residential Area 



2.1.38 Sign 



A residential area is any area situated within 
a district zoned primarily for residential pur- 
poses under the Zoning Bylaw. It includes RE, 
RT, RS and RU. 

Any letter, word, symbol, drawing, picture, de- 
sign, device, article and object that advertises, 
calls attention to or indicates any premises, 
person or activity, whatever the nature of the 
material and manner of composition or construc- 
tion. 



2.1.39 Sign, Accessory 



Any billboard, sign or other advertising device 
that advertises, calls attention to, or indi- 
cates the person occupying the premises on which 
the sign is erected or the business transacted 
thereon, or advertises the property itself or 
any part thereof as for sale or to let, and 
which contains no other advertising matter. 



196 



2.1.40 Sign, Nonaccessory - Any billboard, sign or other advertising device 

that does not come within the foregoing defini- 
tion of an accessory sign. 

2.1.41 Sign, Advertising - A sign used to direct attention to a service, 

sale or other activity not performed on the 
same premises upon which the sign is located. 

2.1.42 Sign, Business - A sign used to direct attention to a service, 

product sold or other activity performed on 
the same premises upon which the sign is loca- 
ted. 

2.1.43 Sign, Identification- A sign used simply to identify the name, ad- 

dress and title of an individual family or firm 
occupying the premises upon which the sign is 
located. 

2.1.44 Sign, Size - In applying the maximum height and width 

limitations prescribed in this Bylaw for signs, 
any intermediary removable surface to which a 
sign is affixed shall be deemed to be a part of 
the sign. 

2.1.45 Sign, Standing - Any sign erected on or affixed to the land and 

any and every exterior sign that is not 
attached to a building. 

2.1.46 Sign, Surface Area of 

2.1.46.1 For a sign, either free-standing or attached, the area 
shall be considered to include all lettering, wording, and 
accompanying designs and symbols, together with the back- 
ground, whether open or enclosed, on which they are dis- 
played, but not including any supporting framework and 
bracing which are incidental to the display itself. 

2.1.46.2 For a sign painted upon or applied to a building, the 
area shall be considered to include all lettering, word- 
ing, and accompanying designs or symbols together with 
any backing of a different color than the finish material 
of the building face. 

2.1.46.3 Where the sign consists of individual letters or symbols 
attached to or painted on a surface, building, wall or 
window, the area shall be considered to be that of the 
smallest quadrangle which encompasses all of the letters 
and symbols. 

2.1.47 Special Permit - A use of a structure or lot or any action upon 

a premises which may be permitted under this 
Bylaw only upon application to and the ap- 
proval of the Board and in accordance with the 
provisions of Section 13. 

2.1.48 Story - A "story" is defined as that part of a building 

between any floor and the floor or roof next 

197 



above. For the purposes of this Zoning Bylaw, 
where a building is not divided into stories, a 
story shall be considered fifteen (15) feet in 
height. A story shall be at least 50% above 
grade. 

2.1.49 Street - A way which is dedicated or devoted to public 

use by legal mapping, by the user, or by any 
other lawful procedure and includes any avenue, 
boulevard, parkway, road, land, public square, 
highway and similar public way which affords the 
prescribed means of principal access to an abut- 
ting lot. 

2.1.50 Structure - A combination of materials assembled at a fixed 

location to give support or shelter, such as a 
building, bridge, trestle, tower, framework, re- 
taining wall, tank, tunnel, tent, stadium, re- 
viewing stand, platform, bin, fence, sign, flag 
pole, or swimming pool. 

2.1.51 Structure, Nonconforming - A structure lawfully existing at the ef- 

fective date of this Bylaw or any amendment 
thereto, which is not in conformity with all 
provisions of this Bylaw. 

2.1.52 Substantially Different Use - Any use which is not permitted either 

by right, or by Special Permit of the Board of 
Appeals within the District in which the lot is 
located. 

2.1.53 Substantially Greater Extent - An accessory use which exceeds 40 per 

cent of the floor area of the existing structure 
or any principal use which encroaches into any 
yard or setback area. 

2.1.54 Usable Open Space - Space in a yard or within a setback area on a 

lot that is unoccupied by buildings, unobstruc- 
ted to the sky, not devoted to service driveways 
or off-street loading or parking spaces and 
available to all occupants of the building on 
the lot expressed as a percentage of gross floor 
area. 

2.1.55 Use - The purpose for which a structure or lot is ar- 

ranged, designed, or intended to be used, oc- 
cupied or maintained. 

2.1.56 Use, Accessory - A use customarily incidental and subordinate to 

the principal use of a structure or lot, or a 
use not the principal use which is located on 
the same lot as the principal structure. 

2.1.57 Use, Nonconforming - A use lawfully existing at the effective date of 

this Bylaw or any amendment thereto which is not 
in conformity with all provisions of this Bylaw. 



198 



2.1.58 Use, Principal 



The main or primary purpose for which a struc- 
ture or lot is designed, arranged, or intended, 
or for which it may be used, occupied or main- 
tained under this Bylaw. Any other use within 
the main structure or the use of any other 
structure or land on the same lot and inciden- 
tal or supplementary thereto and permitted un- 
der this Bylaw shall be considered an acces- 
sory use. 



2.1.59 Variance 



Such departure from the terms of this Bylaw as 
the Board, upon appeal in specific areas, is 
empowered to authorize under the terms of Sec- 
tion 13. 



2.1.60 Watershed Protection District - (See Section 11.2.1 and 11.2.2) 



2.1.61 Yard 



A portion of a lot , other than a court on the 
same lot as the principal building, unob- 
structed artificially from the ground to the 
sky, except as otherwise provided herein. 



2.1.62 Yard, Front 



A space extending for the full width of the lot 
between the front line of the nearest building 
wall and the front lot line. 



2.1.63 Yard, Rear 



A space, unoccupied, except by an accessory 
structure or accessory use as herein permitted, 
extending for the full width of the lot between 
the rear line of the building wall and the rear 
lot line. 



2.1.64 Yard, Side 



An unoccupied space extending for the full 
length of a building between the nearest build- 
ing wall and the side lot line. 



2.1.65 Zoning Bylaw 



- The Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Medfield. 



2.1.66 Zoning Enabling Act- Chapter 40 A of the General Laws of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts and amendments thereto. 



SECTION 3 



3.1 



ESTABLISHMENT OF ZONING DISTRICTS 



DIVISION INTO DISTRICTS 



The Town of Medfield, Massachusetts, is divided into seven Zoning 
Districts designated as follows: 



Full Name 

Residential Estate 
Residential Town 
Residential Suburban 
Residential Urban 



Abbreviation 



R-E 


R-T 


R-S 


R-U 



199 



Full Name 


Abbreviation 


Business 


B 


Business-Industrial 


B-I 


Industrial Extensive 


I-E 


ZONING MAP 





3.2 

The location and boundaries of the Zoning Districts are established 
and shown on a map titled "Zoning Map, Medfield, Massachusetts" 
dated January 11, 1972, and revised to February 1, 1973, which is a 
part of this Bylaw. The authenticity of the Zoning Map shall be 
identified by the signature of the Town Clerk and the imprinted 
seal of the Town under the words: "This is to certify that this is 
the Zoning Map of the Town of Medfield, Massachusetts, referred to 
in the Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Medfield, Massachusetts, which 
was adopted by the Town Meeting commencing March 6, 1972." Any 
change in the location of boundaries of a Zoning District by amend- 
ment of this Bylaw shall be authenticated in the same manner. The 
Zoning Map shall be kept on file in the Office of the Planning 
Board. Photographic reductions of this zoning map may serve as 
copies of the zoning map. 

3.3 BOUNDARIES OF DISTRICTS 

Where uncertainty exists with respect to the boundary of Districts 
shown on the Zoning Map, these rules apply: 

3.3.1 Where a boundary is indicated as a street, railroad, water- 
course or other body of water, it shall be construed to be 
the centerline or middle thereof. Where such a boundary ap- 
proximates a Town boundary then it runs to the limits of the 
Town boundary. 

3.3.2 Where a boundary is indicated as running approximately 
parallel to a street, railroad, watercourse, or other body 
of water, it shall be construed to be parallel thereto at 
the distance shown on the Zoning Map. 

3.3.3 Where a boundary is indicated as a specific elevation, it 
shall be construed as the distance above Mean Sea Level 
based on the Massachusetts Geodetic Datum of 1929. 

3.3.4 When a District boundary line divides a lot that is in one 
ownership of record at the time such line is adopted, a use 
that is permitted on one portion of the lot may be extended 
30 feet into the other portion provided the first portion 
includes the required lot width and depth. This allowance 
does not apply to Flood Plain or Watershed Protection Dis- 
tricts described in Sections 10 and 11. 



200 



INTERPRETATION AND APPLICATION 

4.1 INTERPRETATION 

The provisions of this Bylaw shall be interpreted to be the minimum 
requirements adopted for the promotion of the health, safety, or 
the general welfare of the Town of Medfield, Massachusetts, and ex- 
cept for the Zoning Bylaw adopted by the Town Meeting on April 21, 
1938, and all subsequent amendments thereto, the provisions of this 
Bylaw are not intended to repeal, amend, abrogate, annul or in any 
way impair or interfere with any lawfully adopted law, statute, or- 
dinance, bylaw, covenants, regulations or rules. whenever the regu- 
lations made under the authority hereof differ from those prescribed 
by any law, statute, ordinance, bylaw or other regulations, that 
provision which imposes the greater restriction or the higher 
standard shall govern. 

4.2 APPLICATION 

Except as herein provided, or as specifically exempted by a "shall 
clause" of the Zoning Enabling Act, the provisions of this Bylaw 
shall apply to the following: the erection, construction, recon- 
struction, alteration, or use of buildings and structure or use of 
land. 



SECTION 5 
USE REGULATIONS 

5.1 APPLICABILITY OF USE REGULATIONS 

No building, structure, or land shall be used or occupied except for 
the purposes permitted in its District, 

5.2 PERMITTED USES 

In the following Table of Use Regulations, the uses permitted by 
right in the District are designated by the word "Yes." Those uses 
that may be permitted by Special Permit in the District in accord- 
ance with Section 13 are designated by the letters "SP." Uses that 
are not permitted in the District are designated by the word "No." 

5.3 USES SUBJECT TO OTHER REGULATIONS 

5.3.1 Uses permitted by right or by Special Permit shall be subject 
to all provisions of this Bylaw. 

5.3.2 There shall be no use of a building, structure, or land in any 
District for a purpose that is injurious, dangerous, noxious, 
or offensive to the community by reason of the emission of 
odor, fumes, dust, smoke, vibration, noise or other cause. 
(See Section 13. 10. 6. f.) 

5.3.3 No parking for an Industrial District and no vehicular access 
to an Industrial District shall be on land that is zoned other 
than Industrial. Vehicular access to an Industrial District 
shall be over a public way. 

201 



5.3.4 New public ways and ways into Industrial Districts shall be 
constructed in accordance with the latest Land Subdivision 
Rules and Regulations for the Town of Medf ield , Massachusetts . 

5.3.5 Existing public ways, when rebuilt, shall be constructed to 
conform with the latest Land Subdivision Rules and Regulations 
for the Town of Medf ield , Massachusetts . 

5.3.6 For multifamily dwellings, all waste water shall be disposed 
of by means of adequate connection to the sewage system of the 
Town of Medfield. The connecting system shall be installed in 
accordance with the definitive plan and shall conform with the 
rules of the Water and Sewerage Board and shall be installed 
under their direction. 

5.4 TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 

The Table of Use Regulations that follow is part of this Bylaw. 



5.4 TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 

USE R-E R-T R-S R-U B B-I I-E 

5.4.1 RESIDENTIAL 

5.4.1.1 One- family dwelling 

5.4.1.2 Two-family dwelling 

5.4.1.3 Alteration of two- 
or multi-family dwelling NO 
(See Section 13.10. 6.i) 

5.4.1.4 Multi-family dwelling, 
except for row dwelling, 
including Public Housing 

for the Elderly NO NO NO YES NO NO NO 

5.4.1.5 Open Area Residential 
Development 

(See Section 13. 10. 6. a) SP SP SP SP NO NO NO 

5.4.1.6 Accessory residential 
building such as tool 
shed, boat house, shelter 
for domestic pets, private 
greenhouse, private swimming 
pool and private detached 
garage for up to three 

noncommercial vehicles YES YES YES YES NO NO NO 

5.4.1.7 Wall, fence, hedge or 
similar enclosure (6 feet 

maximum height) YES ' YES YES YES YES YES YES 



:es 


YES 


YES 


YES 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


YES 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


SP 


NO 


NO 


NO 



202 



5.4 TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 



USE R-E R-T R-S R-U B B-I I-E 

5.4.1.8 Storage only of a camper, 
trailer, house trailer or 

boat within a building YES YES YES YES YES YES YES 

5.4.1.9 Trailers (See Section 

13. 10. 6. b) SP SP SP SP SP SP SP 

5.4.2 COMMUNITY FACILITIES 

5.4.2.1 Church or other religious 

use YES YES YES YES YES YES YES 

5.4.2.2 Educational use which is 
religious, sectarian, 

denominational or public YES YES YES YES YES YES YES 

5.4.2.3 Nonprofit recreational 
facility, not including 

a membership club YES YES YES YES YES YES NO 

5.4.2.4 Nonprofit country, 
hunting, fishing, tennis 
or golf club without 

liquor license SP SP SP SP NO NO NO 

5.4.2.5 Nonprofit day camp or 

other nonprofit camp SP SP SP SP NO NO NO 

5.4.2.6 Town building, except 

equipment garage YES YES YES YES YES YES SP 

5.4.2.7 Town cemetery, including 

any crematory YES YES YES YES YES NO SP 

5.4.2.8 Historical association 

or society SP SP SP SP YES SP SP 

5.4.2.9 Hospital, sanitarium 

or sanatorium NO NO SP SP NO NO NO 

5.4.2.10 Street, bridge, tunnel YES YES YES YES YES YES YES 

5.4.2.11 Town equipment garage NO NO NO NO YES YES YES 

5.4.2.12 Public utility, water filter 
plant and sewage treatment 
plant, except power plant 

and refuse facility SP SP S? SP SP SP SP 

5.4.2.13 Power plant and refuse 

facility NO NO NO NO NO SP YES 



203 



5.4 TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 



USj; R-E R-T R-S R-U B B-I I-E 

5.4.2.14 Temporary (not over 30 
days) amusement enterprise, 
not including any permanent 

structures SP SP SP SP SP SP SP 

5.4.2.15 Temporary structures for 
storage of materials or 

equipment SP SP SP SP SP SP SP 

5.4.2.16 Licensed day nursery or 
other agency for the day 

care of children YES YES YES YES NO NO NO 

5.4.3 AGRICULTURAL 

5.4.3.1 Agriculture, horticulture 
and floriculture, not 
including a greenhouse or 

stand for retail sale YES YES YES YES YES YES YES 

5.4.3.2 Year-round greenhouse or 
stand for wholesale and 
retail sale of agricultural 
or farm products or products 
related to greenhouse business, 
such as peat or insecticides 

SP SP SP SP YES YES NO 

5.4.3.3 Temporary (not exceeding 

a period of three consecutive 

months) greenhouse or 

stand for retail sale of 

agricultural or farm products 

raised primarily on the 

premises YES YES YES YES YES YES NO 

5.4.3.4 Raising of livestock, 
horses, poultry and grazing 
of animals, not including 
the raising of swine or fur 
animals for commercial use. 
(Foxes, skunks, minks, raccoons 
or other furbearing animals 
shall not be kept or raised 

for commercial purposes anywhere 

within the Town.) YES YES SP NO NO NO NO 

5.4.3.5 Commercial stables, kennels, 
or veterinary hospital in 
which all animals, fowl or 

other forms of life are in completely 

enclosed pens or other structures at 

least 200 feet from any 

lot line SP SP SP SP NO NO NO 



204 



5.4 TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 



USE 



R-E 



R-T 



R-S 



R-U 



B B-l I-E 



5.4 

5.4 

5.4. 
5.4. 



3.6 Growing of crops and conser- 
vation of water plants and 
wild life YES 



YES 



.3.7 Noncommercial forestry 
and growing of all 
vegetation 

RETAIL AND SERVICE 



YES 



5.4, 



4.1 Stores usually selling a 
combination of two or more 
of the following: Dry 

goods, apparel and accessories, 
furniture and home furnishings , 
small wares, hardware and 
food NO 

4.2 Establishments primarily 
selling food and drink 
for home preparation and 
consumption or on their 

own premises NO 



5.4.4.3 Sales by vending machines SP 

5.4.4.4 Establishments selling 
new automobiles or new and 
used automobiles and trucks, 
new automobile tires and other 
accessories, aircraft, boats, 
motorcycles, and household 
trailers 

4.5 Hotels and Motels 

4.6 Trailer camp 



5.4, 
5.4, 
5.4, 

5.4. 

5.4. 

5.4. 



4.7 Lodging house (See 
Section 13. 10. 6. c) 

4.8 Personal service 
establishments 

4.9 Funeral home or 
mortuary establishment 

4.10 Convalescent or nursing 
homes and medical and 
dental offices 



NO 



YES 



YES YES YES YES 



YES YES YES YES YES YES 



NO 



NO YES YES NO 



NO 


NO 


NO 


YES 


YES 


NO 


SP 


SP 


SP 


YES 


YES 


YES 



NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


SP 


YES 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


SP 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


SP 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


YES 


YES 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


SP 


YES 


YES 


NO 



5.4.4.11 Membership club 



NO 


NO 


NO 


SP 


SP 


SP 


NO 


SP 


SP 


SP 


SP 


YES 


YES 


NO 



205 



5.4 TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 



USE 



R-E 



R-T 



R-S 



R-U 



t-1 



1-E 



5 . A . k 



11 Miscellaneous business 
offices and services 



NO 



NO NO NO YES YES NO 






13 Home occupation (See 
Section 13. 10. 6. d.) 



SP 



SP SP SP NO NO NO 



5.4.4. 14 Auto service stations 
(gasoline and oil) 



NO 



NO NO NO SP SP NO 



.-.-.15 Automotive repair, 

automobile services and 
garages (not including 
a junk yard or automotive 
graveyard) NO 



NO NO NO SP SP SP 



5.4.4.16 Automotive graveyard or 

other junk yard NO 



NO NO NO NO NO NO 



5.4.4 



17 Miscellaneous repair 

service NO 



NO NO NO YES YES YES 



5.4.4 



18 Indoor motion picture 

establishment NO 



NO NO NO SP SP SP 



5.4.4 



18.1 Outdoor motion picture 
establishment NO 



NO NO NO NO NO NO 



5.4.4.19 Amusement and recreation 

services NO 



NO NO NO SP SP NO 



5.4.4.21 Commercial communications 

and television towers NO 



NO 



NO 



NO NO NO NO 



5.4.4.22 Airfield or landing area 

for fixed-wing aircraft NO 



NO 



NO 



NO NO NO NO 



5.4.4.22.1 Helicopter landing 
area, not including 
gyrocopters 



NO 



NO 



NO 



NO NO NO SP 



3 Commercial parking lot or 
structure NO 



NO 



NO 



NO YES YES NO 



-.24 Planned business development 
>e Section 13. 10. 6. e.) NO 



NO 



NO 



NO SP SP NO 



5.4.4.25 Filling of land or watercourse, 
water body or wetlands (See 

• ion 10.4 and 11.4.) SP SP 



SP 



SP SP SP SP 



►.26 Construction of drainage 



206 



5. A TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 



USE R-E R-T R-S R-U B B-l 1-E 

facilities or damming or 

relocating any watercourse, 

water body or wetlands 

(See Sections 10.4 and 

11.4) SP SP SP SP SP SP SP 

5.4.4.2 7 Appliance and furniture 

repair service NO NO NO NO SP SP SP 

5.4.4.28 Commercial or 

membership tennis courts 

or clubs, including 

squash and paddle 

tennis NO NO NO NO YES SP SP 

5.4.5 WHOLESALE AND MANUFACTURING (See Section 13) 

5.4.5.1 Mining and quarrying NO NO NO NO NO NO NO 

5.4.5.2 Storage of construction 
supplies and construction 

equipment NO NO NO NO NO NO SP 

5.4.5.3 Manufacturing: 

5. 4. 5. 3. a.) Furniture, lumber and 

wood products NO NO NO NO NO SP YES 

5.4.5. 3. b.) Primary metal industries 

NO NO NO NO NO NO SP 

5. 4.5. 3. c.) Fabricated metal 

industrial NO NO NO NO NO SP YES 

5.4.5.3.d.) Machinery, electrical 
machinery, equipment and 
supplies NO NO NO NO NO YES YES 

5.4.5. 3. e.) Motor vehicle 

equipment NO NO NO NO NO YES YES 

5. 4. 5.3. f.) Transportation 

equipment NO NO NO NO NO YES YES 

5.4.5. 3. g.) Other durable goods NO NO NO NO NO SP SP 

5. 4.5. 3. h.) Food and kindred 

products NO NO NO NO NO YES YES 

5.4.5.3-i.) Textile and mill 

products NO NO NO NO NO SP SP 

5.4.5.3.J.) Apparel and other NO NO NO NO NO YES YES 
fabricated textile products 

207 



5.4 TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 






R-E R-T 



R-S 



R-U B 



I-E 



5.4.5. 3. k.) Printing, publishing 
and allied industries, 
except paper manufacturing 



5.4.5 

5.4.5 
5.4.5 



NO NO 

3.1.) Chemicals and 

allied products NO NO 

3.m.) Other nondurable goods NO NO 



Railroads and railway express 
service NO 



NO 



5.4.5.5 



5.4.5.6 



Trucking service and 
warehousing 



Taxi cab stands 

and public transportation 

ticket sales NO 



5.4.5.7 Wholesale Trade 
5.4.5 



NO 



Earth removal, transfer 
or storage (See Section 
12) SP 



NO NO SP SP YES 

NO NO NO SP SP 

NO NO NO SP SP 

NO NO NO YES YES 



NO NO NO NO NO YES YES 



NO NO NO YES YES YES 
NO NO NO NO YES YES 

SP SP SP SP SP SP 



6.1 



6.2 



SECTION 6 

AREA, HEIGHT AND BULK REGULATIONS 

APPLICABILITY OF AREA, HEIGHT AND BULK REGULATIONS 

The regulations for each district pertaining to lot area, dimensions 
and residential floor space shall be as specified in this section 
and set forth in the Table of Area Regulations and Table of Height 
and Bulk Regulations , and shall be subject to the further 
provisions of this Section. 

TABLE OF AREA REGULATIONS 

The Table of Ar e a Regulations that follows together with the 
Note s (6.2) are part of this Bylaw. 



Minimum Required Lots 



Yards 



District 



Use 



Front- 
Area age Width Depth Front Side Rear 
(sq.ft.) (ft.) (ft.) (ft.) (ft.) (ft.) (ft.) 



R-E Any permitted structure 

or principal use 80,000 180 225 200 40 



25 



50 



208 



6.2 TABLE OF AREA REGULATIONS 



Minimum Required Lots 



Yards 



District 



Use 



R-T Any permitted structure 
or principal use 



Front- 
Area age Width Depth 
(sq.ft.) (ft.) (ft.) (ft.) 



Front Side Rear 
(ft.) (ft.) (ft.) 



40,000 142 175 



150 



40 15 50 



R-S Any permitted structure 
or principal use 



20,000 



96 120 



125 



30 



12 



40 



R-U One-family dwelling 
Two-family dwelling 
Multi-family dwelling 

(per unit) 
Public Housing for the 
Elderly 

(per unit) 
Convalescent or nursing 
home 

Funeral home or mortuary 
establishment 
Any permitted community 
facility 

Any other permitted 
structure or principal 
use 

B Any permitted structure 
or principal use 



12,000 


80 


100 


100 


20 


12 


30 


20,000 


100 


100 


100 


20 


12 


30 


12,000+ 


200 


200 


' 100 


30 


20 


50 


3,000 














12,000+ 


200 


200 


100 


30 


20 


50 


2,000 














40,000 


200 


200 


100 


30 


20 


50 


40,000 


200 


200 


100 


30 


20 


50 


12,000 


100 


100 


100 


20 


12 


30 


12,000 


100 


100 


100 


20 


12 


30 


12,000 


60 


60 


60 


15 


12 


12 



Automotive sales, 
service or repair 
establishment 



40,000 200 200 100 25 12 12 



Motion picture or 
amusement and 
recreation 
establishment 



40,000 200 200 100 25 



12 12 



Any other permitted 
structure or principal 
use 

B-I Any permitted structure 
or principal use 

I-E Any permitted structure 
or principal use 



12,000 



10,000 



60 



60 



60 



60 



60 15 



60 10 



40,000 200 200 200 25 



12 12 



6 12 



25 25 



209 



TABLE OF AREA REGULATION NOTES 

6.2.1 Except for planned business and industrial developments, Public 
Housing for the Elderly, Community Facilities and public 
utilities (See Section 13) only one principal structure shall be 
permitted on one lot. 

6.2.2 For purposes of determining setback requirements both yards of a 
corner lot that front on a street shall be considered front 
yards on the street on which they are located. 

6.2.3 A side yard which is used for a legal service driveway shall 
have a minimum width of 12 feet. 

6.2.4 For purposes of determining setback requirements both yards of a 
through lot that front on a street shall be considered front 
yards on the street on which they are located. 

6.2.5 Frontage shall be measured at the street line. On corner and 
through lots frontage shall be measured on one street only. 

6.2.6 Building within the Flood Plain District or Watershed Protection 
District shall be subject to Sections 10 and 11. 

6.2.7 Only the following projections into required yards, or other 
required open spaces are permitted: 

a. A balcony or bay window limited in total length in one half 
the length of the building shall project not more than two 
feet. 

b. Open terrace, steps or stoop under 4 feet in height shall 
project not more than one half of the required yard setback. 

c. Steps or stoop over 4 feet in height, window sill, belt 
course, chimney, roof eave , fire escape, fire tower, storm 
enclosure or similar architectural features shall not 
project more than 2 feet into the required yard setback 
area. 

6.2.8 In "B" and "B-I" Districts all uses shall be conducted within a 
completely enclosed building, except: dispensing of food, 
beverages or goods at a drive-in or stand; dispensing of gas, 
water or lubricants at a garage or gasoline service station; 
vegetation held for sale in a horticulture or floriculture 
business; permitted parking or loading; and permitted exterior 
signs. 

6.2.9 Screening and buffers shall be required in the Industrial 
Extensive (I-E) District. There shall be a landscaped buffer 
strip along each boundary which adjoins a residential use or 
district. This strip shall be at least 150 feet in width and 
shall be portioned as follows: 

a. The portion of such buffer strip within one hundred feet of 
the district boundary line shall be used only for, and 
maintained as, a planting area for lawns, trees, shrubs, or 

210 



6.2 TABLE OF AREA REGULATION NOTES 

other landscape materials to provide a visual barrier 
between districts. 

b. The remaining fifty (50) feet of space may be used for off- 
street parking or other permitted open uses, and shall not 
contain any permanent structure. 

6.2.10 In a Business District, a Business-Industrial District, or a lot 
in a RU District on which a multi-family dwelling is placed, 
there shall be a landscaped buffer strip along each boundary 
which adjoins a residential lot. The strip shall be at least 

10 feet in width and shall contain a screen of plantings in the 
strip not less than 5 feet in width and 6 feet in height at the 
time of the occupancy of any lot. Individual bushes or trees 
shall be planted not more than 3 feet on centers, and shall 
thereafter be maintained by the owner or occupants so as to 
maintain a dense screen year-round. All of the plantings shall 
be evergreen. No building shall be placed within this buffer 
strip. 

6.2.11 In any "R" District permitted accessory buildings shall conform 
to the following provisions: They shall not occupy more than 
40 percent of the required rear yard; they shall be not less 
than 60 feet from any street lot line, except on a corner lot if 
used for garage purposes, then the same distance as required 
depth of the front yard for adjacent lots; they shall not be 
less than 6 feet from any lot line. 

6.2.12 All "IE" uses shall conform to "IE" District regulations. 

6.2.13 All "BI" uses shall conform to "BI" District regulations. 

6.2.14 All "B" uses shall conform to "B" District regulations. 

6.2.15 All "R" uses shall conform to "R" District regulations. 

6.3 TABLE OF HEIGHT AND BULK REGULATIONS 

The Table of Height and Bulk Regulations that follows together with the 
Notes (6.3) are declared to be part of this Bylaw. 

Multi- 
Minimum family 
Residential Dwelling 
Net Minimum 

Maximum Minimum Floor Unit 

Maximum Permitted Floor Area Ratio Usable Area Floor 
Height Height Incl. Access. Open Area 

District (ft.) (Stories) Bldgs. Space (%) (sq.ft.) (sq.ft.) 

Not Permitted 

Not Permitted 

Not Permitted 
500 450** 



R-E 


35 


2-1/2 


0.20 




40 


768 1 


R-T 


35 


2-1/2 


0.25 




40 


768 I 


R-S 


35 


2-1/2 


0.35 




40 


768 1 


R-U 


45 


3 or 4* 


0.50 


211 


20 


768 



6.3 TABLE OF HEIGHT AND BULK REGULATIONS 



Multi- 
Minimum family 
Residential Dwelling 
Net Minimum 
Maximum Minimum Floor Unit 
Maximum Permitted Floor Area Ratio Usable Area Floor 
Height Height Incl. Access. Open Area 
Distr ict (ft.) (Stories) Bldgs. Space (%) ( sq.ft.) (sq.ft. ) 



B 
B-I 
I-E 



30 

30 



0.75 5 Not Permitted Not Permitted 

0.75 5 Not Permitted Not Permitted 

10 Not Permitted Not Permitted 
*See Section 6.3.4 



(See Commonwealth of 0.50 
Massachusetts State 
Building Code, Chapter 
30A - Mass. General Laws, 

Table 2.6 for maximum per- **450 sq. ft. required for Public 
mitted height in feet and Housing for Elderly, 
the maximum number of story 
heights permitted.) 



6. 3 TABLE OF HEIGHT AND BULK REGULATIONS NOTES 

6.3.1 Any maximum height permitted in this Bylaw shall be further 
subject to the restrictions of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
State Building Code and shall not apply to: 

6. 3.1. a) Community facility and public utility structures, provided 
that the side yards, rear yards and setbacks required in the 
district for the highest permitted principal structure shall be 
increased 2 feet in width for each foot by which the height of 
such structure exceeds the height permitted in the district. 

6.3.1.b) Necessary appurtenant structures such as church spire, 

belfrey, cupola, dome, smokestack, monument, derrick, conveyor, 
flag pole, communications tower, mast, antenna, aerial, airplane 
hanger, roof tank, building service equipment, roof structure 
other than a penthouse, chimney or parapet wall, or any similar 
appurtenance provided that the side yards, rear yard and setback 
be increased one foot horizontally for each two feet that the 
height of such structure exceeds the height permitted in the 
district. 

6.3.I.c) Special industrial structures; such as a cooling tower, grain 
elevator, sugar refinery, gas holder or other similar structure 
where the industrial process requires a greater height, provided 
that any such structure shall not occupy more than 15 percent of 
the lot area and shall be not less than 50 feet from any lot line. 

6.3.2 A fence, hedge, wall or other enclosure may be maintained on a 
corner lot, provided that it shall not, at intersecting streets, 
obstruct visual clearance between 3-1/2 feet and 10 feet above the 
grade within the triangular area formed by the intersection of the 



212 



6.3 TABLE OF HEIGHT AND BULK REGULATIONS NOTES 

6.3.2 curb lines and a straight line joining said curb lines at points 
which are 25 feet measured from the intersection of the curb 
lines . Where curbs do not exist, the lines shall be where such 
curb would be required if built. 

6.3.3 A basement or cellar, to be inhabited, must have the ceiling not 
less than five (5) feet above the average elevation of the land 
immediately surrounding the building foundation wall. 

6.3.4 Where four (4) stories are built, only three (3) stories may be 
inhabited. 



SECTION 7 



SIGNS 



7.1 PURPOSE 

This section is adopted for the regulation and restriction within 
various zoning districts of the Town of Medfield of billboards, signs 
and other advertising devices on public ways or on private property 
within public view of a public way, public park or reservation. This 
section shall not apply to signs exempted by Section 32 of Chapter 93 
of the General Laws. 

7.2 REGULATIONS AND RESTRICTIONS 

7.2.1 "R" Districts 

In any residential district, no exterior signs shall be 
permitted except those pertaining to the lease or sale of a lot 
or building on which placed, and not exceeding a total area of 
twelve square feet. On a lot occupied by a dwelling there shall 
not be more than one sign pertaining to the use thereof or 
bearing the name and occupation of any occupant or occupants, 
and no such sign shall exceed one square foot in area; for 
premises used for home occupations, there shall be no exterior 
signs other than a small nonelectrical sign not to exceed one 
square foot in area, and carrying only the name and occupation 
of any occupant of the premises such as a physician, artisan, 
beautician, lawyer, architect, engineer, clergyman, accountant, 
osteopath, dentist and similar occupations or professions as 
provided under Section 13.10. 6. d. Signs shall not obstruct 
visual clearance at intersecting streets within the area 
provided by paragraph 6.3.2 of this Bylaw. 



7. 2. 2. a) In a Business (B) or Business-Industrial (B-I) District 
only the following exterior signs are premitted. 

7.2.2.a)(l) One sign for each fifty (50) feet, or fraction 

thereof, of lot frontage on the principal street, 
or for each separate and distinct establishment on 



213 



7.2 REFLATIONS AND RESTRICTIONS 



the premises, provided that the aggregate area of all 
such signs shall not exceed one hundred (100) square 
feet for each said unit of frontage. In a Business 
(B) or Business-Industrial (B-I) District no sign 
shall be located nearer to the street line than the 
permitted setback distance for a building on the 
same lot. 

7.2.2.b) In an Industrial-Extensive (I-E) District only the 
following exterior signs are permitted: 

(1) One sign for each one hundred (100) feet, or 

fraction thereof, of lot frontage on the principal 
street, provided that the aggregate area of all such 
signs shall not exceed one hundred (100) square feet 
for each unit of frontage. No such sign shall be 
located nearer to the street line than the permitted 
setback distance for a building on the same lot. 

7.2.2.c) In Business (B) , Business-Industrial (B-I) and the 
Industrial-Extensive (I-E) , no exterior sign shall 
have a height greater than the highest point on the 
roof of the main building to which it pertains, or 
greater than twenty-five (25) feet above the mean 
grade of the curb of the principal frontage street, 
whichever is higher. 

7.2.2.d) In Business (B) , Business-Industrial (B-I) and the 
Industrial Extensive (I-E) , no exterior sign and no 
interior sign readily visible from the exterior of a 
building shall be illuminated by other than a steady 
light (with no flashing or other interruption). No 
exterior sign shall be rotated, oscillated, or other- 
wise regularly moved, or shall be designed to turn 
or flutter in the wind, or shall in anyway be other 
than stationary. 

7.2.2.e) For the purpose of this Section, an exterior sign is 
any structure or part thereof located outside of a 
building, or any device attached to or printed or 
represented on the exterior of a building or 
structure (including, but not limited to display 
signs) which shall display or include any letter, 
word, model, banner, flag, pennant, insignia, 
device or other representation used as, or which is 
in the nature of, an announcement, direction or 
advertisement. Where a sign consists of individual 
letters, insignia or other individual representa- 
tions, the area of the sign shall be considered to 
be that of the smallest rectangle which encompasses 
all of said letters, insignia or other representa- 
tions. (See Section2.1.42 and 2.1.44.) 

7. 2 . 2 . f ) Exterior signs which indicate necessary directions 
only (such as "entrance," "exit," or "parking") or 
are required for safety purposes, are exempt from 

214 



7.2 REGULATIONS AND RESTRICTIONS 



7.2.2.f) the provisions of this Section, provided that each 
such sign has an area of not over two (2) square 
feet and is unlighted, or illuminated only by steady 
white light. Posters (including price tags) which 
are attached to merchandise lawfully displayed are 
also exempt, provided that each such poster has an 
area of not over one (1) square foot. 



SECTION 8 



OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS 



8.1 



OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING REQUIREMENTS 



In any district, if a structure is constructed or enlarged, or an 
existing use is enlarged or changed, or the dimensions of a lot are 
changed, off-street parking and loading spaces shall be provided 
that are off the street in accordance with the following Table of 
Of f-Street P arking Standards for the entire structure or use unless 
the change in units or measurements amounts to less than 15 percent 
as a whole whether such increase occurs at one time or in successive 
stages. 

8.1 TABLE OF OFF-STREET PARKING STANDARDS 



USE 



NUMBER OF PARKING SPACES per UNIT 



Dwelling 

Lodging house, motel or hotel 



Two per unit 

One and one half per rental unit, plus one 
for each 20 sq. ft. of floor area avail- 
able for meetings or functions, plus one 
for each two employees. 



Retail, service, finance, 
insurance or real estate 
establishment; 

Medical offices and clinics 

Other professional offices 



One per each 120 sq. ft. of floor space 

open to the public plus one for each two 

employees : 

Five spaces for each doctor having office 

space therein 

Two for each person working in the office. 

Minimum three spaces per office. 



Wholesale establishment 



One per each 500 square feet of floor 
space. 



Manufacturing or industrial 
establishment 



One per each 1000 sq. ft. of floor space 



Auditorium, gymnasium, 
stadium, theatre, church 
or other place of assemblage 



One space for each four seats or each 8 
feet of bench therein to be based on the 
maximum seating capacity 



Hospitals, extended care 
facilities or nursing homes 



Two per bed at design capacity 



215 



8.1 TABLE OF OFF-STREET PARKING STANDARDS 



USE 



NUMBER OF PARKING SPACES per UNIT 



Public Housing for Elderly 
School or college 



Community facility (town 
building, recreation, etc.) or 
public utility establishment 



Restaurants, night clubs or 
eating places. 



One fourth per unit 

Two per classroom in an elementary and 
junior high school and four per classroom 
in a senior high school plus spaces as 
required above for auditorium or gymnasium, 
whichever has the larger capacity 

One per 300 square feet or fraction there- 
of of participator floor space plus space 
for spectators as required in auditorium, 
gymnasium, etc., above. 



One space for each three seats or stools 
plus one space for each two employees plus 
space for each two lineal feet of " cus- 
tomer service" counter. 



Fast food take-out 
establishment and drive-in 
restaurant 

Bowling alley 

Barber shop, beauty parlor 



Self-service dry cleaners 
and self-service laundries 



One parking space for every ten square 
feet of floor space plus one for every two 

employees. 

Seven spaces for each bowling lane 

Two spaces for each chair installed, and 
one space for each two operators 

One space for each two machines installed, 
including dryers 



Gasoline and service stations Three spaces for each service bay. 



8.2 GENERAL PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS 

8.2.1 Accessory parking or loading spaces that are maintained in 
any district in connection with an existing use on the 
effective date of this Bylaw shall hereafter be maintained 
so long as the use continues, unless an equivalent number of 
parking or loading spaces is constructed elsewhere conform- 
ing to the requirements of these regulations. 

8.2.2 When units or measurements that determine the number of re- 
quired parking or loading spaces result in a requirement of 
a fractional space, a fraction over one half shall require 
one parking or loading space. 

8.2.3 The required parking spaces shall be provided either on the 
same premises with the parking generator, or on any premises 
associated therewith. The walking distance between the far- 
thest point of the parking area and the main pedestrian 
entrance to the building or use in question shall not ex- 
ceed five hundred (500 feet, except that in the case of 



216 



8.2. GENERAL PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS 

8.2.3 parking space for employees only, the distance may be in- 
creased to eight hundred (800) feet. Such walking distance 
shall be only over land owned or controlled by the parking 
generator or over a public way. When the required parking 
spaces are not immediately adjacent to the parking genera- 
tor, directional signs to the parking spaces must be posted. 
Such signs shall conform with Section 7.2.2.f. 

8.2.4 Where required parking spaces are provided away from the lot 
on which the use or structure they are intended to serve is 
located, such spaces shall be in the same possession, either 
by deed or lease, as the property occupied by the use or 
structure to which the parking spaces are accessory. If 
both the structure and the parking area are leased, the 
period of time of the parking-area lease shall be the same 
as the structure lease. 

8.2.5 The loading spaces required for the uses listed in the above 
table shall in all cases be on the same lot as the use they 
are intended to serve. In no case shall the required load- 
ing spaces be part of the area used to satisfy the parking 
requirements of this Bylaw. 

8.2.6 No accessory off-street parking shall be permitted within 
the required front yard or side yard in any "R" District. 

8.2.7 For any use not enumerated in this Section, off-street park- 
ing spaces shall be one space for each employee plus one 
space for each 50 square feet of floor area. The Board of 
Appeals may make exceptions to this Section by means of a 
Special Permit which will be granted only after an affirma- 
tive finding that the proposed parking will be adequate and 
such a Special Permit must be applied for in conformance 
with Section 13 of this Bylaw. 

8.2.8 Where differing uses occur on a single parcel of land, the 
number of off-street parking spaces to be provided shall be 
the sum of the requirements for each use. 

8.2.9 All parking and loading spaces required under this Bylaw 
shall be built and must be inspected by the Building In- 
spector. No occupancy permits shall be granted until said 
parking and loading facilities have been approved by the 
Building Inspector. 



8.3 PARKING AND LOADING SPACE STANDARDS 

All parking or loading areas containing over five spaces, including 
automobile service and drive-in establishments, shall be either 
contained within structures, or subject to the following: 

8. 3. 1 The area shall be effectively screened on each side which 

adjoins or faces the side or rear lot line of a lot situated 
in any "R" District. The screening shall consist of that 
required for buffers as specified in Section 6, paragraphs 

217 



8.3 PARKING AND LOADING SPACE STANDARDS 

6.2.8 and 6.2.9. The screening shall be set back from each 
street no more than the main building wall minimum set back. 

8.3.2 The area and access driveways thereto shall be surfaced with 
a durable and dustless material and shall be constructed so 
that all surface water drains rapidly. 

8.3.3 A substantial bumper of masonry, steel, heavy timber or con- 
crete curb stop shall be placed at the edge of surfaced areas 
except driveways in order to protect abutting structures, 
properties and sidewalks. 

8.3.4 Any fixture used to illuminate an area shall be so arranged 
as to direct the light away from the street and away from 
adjoining premises used for residential purposes. 

8.3.5 Any repair or service facility for use by vehicles such as 
gas, oil, or water shall be at least 25 feet from any lot 
line. 

8.3.6 Any parking area shall also be subject to the following: 

8. 3. 6. a) There shall be no vehicle parking or loading 

spaces within 5 feet of any front, side or rear 
lot line. 

8.3.6.b) There shall be no vehicle repair facilities with- 
in parking areas. 

8.3.6.c) There shall be no storage of material or equipment 
within parking areas. 

8.3.6.d) Parking shall not be located within the required 
front yard area in any "R" District. However, 
access driveways may be located within the requir- 
ed front yard area. 

8.3.6.e) Parking and loading spaces shall be so arranged as 
not to permit backing of automobiles onto any 
street . 

8.3.6.f) No portion of any entrance or exit driveway to the 
area shall be closer than 150 feet to the center- 
line of an intersecting street. No more than two 
driveways shall serve any one area. 

8.3.6.g) No point of any two driveways leading from a 

street to a single area shall be within 50 feet of 

each other at their intersections with the front 
lot line. 

8.3.6.h) No entrance or exit driveway shall exceed 20 feet 
in width, except for a suitable radius of curva- 
ture at the entrance. All entrance and exit 
driveways in "B", "B-I" and "I-E" Districts shall 
be one way. 



218 



SECTION 9 



NONCONFORMING USES, STRUCTURES AND LOTS 



9.1 APPLICATION OF NONCONFORMITY 

The provisions of this Section shall apply to all districts as estab- 
lished in this Bylaw and as amended. 

9.2 EXTENSION AND ALTERATION 

9.2.1 A nonconforming use shall not be extended except for agriculture, 
horticulture or floriculture. 

9.2.2 A nonconforming lot that has no structure shall not be extended 
except for agriculture, horticulture or floriculture. 

9.2.3 A nonconforming principal use of a structure shall not be ex- 
tended. 

9.2.4 A conforming principal use of a nonconforming structure may be 
extended throughout the existing structure. 

9.2.5 A nonconforming accessory use of a portion of a conforming 
structure or conforming accessory use of a portion of a noncon- 
forming structure may be extended up to a maximum of 40 percent 
of the floor area of the existing structure. 

9.2.6 A nonconforming structure located in any "R" District may be al- 
tered and the use, if conforming, may be extended throughout the 
altered portion provided: any conforming use shall not be made 
nonconforming, and the alteration shall not cause the structure 
to violate the maximum floor area ratio and yard regulations of 
the zoning district in which it is located. 

9.3 REDUCTION OR INCREASE 

9.3.1 A nonconforming lot or open space on a lot (yards, setbacks, 
courts, usable open space, or floor area ratio) shall not be 
changed so as to be in greater nonconformity. 

9.3.2 Any nonconforming off-street parking or loading area if already 
containing less than the required number of spaces to serve 
their intended use shall not be further reduced in size or num- 
ber of spaces. 

9.4 CHANGE 

9.4.1 A nonconforming use of a structure may not be changed to another 
nonconforming use. 

9.4.2 A nonconforming lot, use or structure which has come into conform- 
ity shall not again be changed to a nonconforming lot, use or 
structure. 



219 



NONCONFORMING USES, STRUCTURES AND LOTS 

9.4.3 A conforming lot, structure, or use shall not be enlarged, re- 
duced or changed in any manner so as to become nonconforming. 
A conforming lot shall not be divided so as to leave preexisting 
structures on a nonconforming lot or to render their use noncon- 
forming. 

9.5 RESTORATION 

9.5.1 Any change or restoration in any nonconforming structure which 
would normally require a building permit shall require a variance, 

9.5.2 Any conforming structure damaged more than 50% by fire or other 
casualty located on a nonconforming lot may be restored or re- 
built. No such restoration or rebuilding shall be permitted 
which changes the use or structure to a nonconforming use or 
structure. The rebuilding or restoration of such conforming 
structure will not require a new variance. 

9.6 ABANDONMENT 

If the nonconforming use, except for agriculture, horticulture or 
floriculture, of a structure or lot has been abandoned for a continuous 
period of one year or more the lot or structure shall not be used again 
except for a conforming use. 

9.7 MOVING 

A nonconforming structure shall not be moved to any other location on 
its lot or any other lot unless every portion of such structure and the 
use thereof shall become conforming and the change will be in accordance 
with the Are a and Yard Regulations of this Bylaw. 

9.8 UNSAFE STRUCTURE 

Any nonconforming structure determined by the Building Inspector to be 
unsafe may be restored to a safe condition, provided that the restora- 
tion shall not place it in greater nonconformity. If the cost to re- 
store any nonconformity exceeds 50% of its physical replacement value, 
it shall be reconstructed only as a conforming structure unless a new 
variance is secured. 

SECTION 10 

FLOOD PLAIN DISTRICT 



10.1 PURPOSE 

The purpose of this section is to promote: 

(a) The health and safety of the occupants of lands subject to season- 
al or periodic flooding in the Charles and Stop Rivers Flood Plain 
District. 



220 



FLOOD PLAIN DISTRICT 

(b) The preservation of the natural flood control characteristics and 
the water storage capacity of the Flood Plain District. 

(c) The safety and purity of water; control and containment of sewage; 
safety of gas, electric, fuel and other utilities from breaking, 
leaking, short circuiting, grounding, igniting, electrocuting or any 
other dangers due to flooding. 

10.2 DEFINITION 

The Flood Plain District is superimposed over all Districts established 
by this Bylaw. The Flood Plain District is defined as all lands along 
or sloping to the Stop River and Charles River whose elevation is below 
125 feet Mean Sea Level based on the Massachusetts Geodetic Datum of 
1929 and as shown on the Zoning Map of the Town of Medfield. 

10.3 USE 

10.3.1 Land in the Flood Plain District may be used for any purpose 
otherwise permitted in the underlying District except that: 

10.3.1.1 No building permit shall be issued nor any building, wall, dam 
or other structure shall be erected, constructed, altered, 
enlarged or otherwise created or moved for any purpose unless 

a Special Permit is issued by the Board of Appeals. 

10.3.1.2 Dumping, filling, excavating or transferring of any earth or 
fill material within the District is prohibited unless a 
Special Permit is issued by the Board of Appeals. 

10.3.1.3 No ponds or pools shall be created or other changes in water 
courses allowed whether for swimming, fishing, or other 
recreational uses, agricultural uses, scenic features or drain- 
age improvements or any other uses unless a Special Permit is 
issued by the Board of Appeals. 

10.3.2.1 Proper operation and maintenance of existing dams and other 
water control devices are permitted uses under this section. 
This includes the temporary alteration of the water level for 
emergency or maintenance purposes and the removal of any and 
all flashboards of a privately-owned dam in order to lower the 
water level. 

10.3.2.2 No new dams or other water-control devices shall be created 
unless a Special Permit is issued by the Board of Appeals. 

10.3.3 Municipal uses, such as waterworks, pumping stations and 
parks, are permitted under this section. 

10.4 APPLICATION FOR SPECIAL PERMIT 



10.4.1 Any person desiring a Special Permit for any use set cut in 
Section 10.3.1 above within the Flood Plain District shall 
submit an application to the Board of Appeals, in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 40A of the Massachusetts 
General Laws as amended, and a copy thereof to the Building 



221 



10 . 4 APPLICATION FOR SPECIAL PERMIT 

Inspector. The application shall be accompanied by plans of 
of any construction and of the premises on which it is to be 
situated. All plans shall show existing and proposed finished 
ground contour at two-foot intervals. Contours shall be de- 
lineated within 200 feet of the proposed construction. 

10.4.2 Copies of the application for Special Permit to the Board of 
Appeals with accompanying plans shall also be sent to the 
Building Inspector, Board of Health, Conservation Commission 
and Planning Board for their recommendations to the Board of 
Appeals, as to their approval, disapproval or appropriate 
recommendations . 

10.4.3 All such plans shall be certified by a Registered Land Sur- 
veyor or a Registered Professional Civil Engineer. 

10.5 ISSUANCE OF SPECIAL PERMITS 

10.5.1 The Board of Appeals, after holding a public hearing, shall 

issue a permit under this section if it finds that the use of 
the premises will not endanger the health or safety of the 
occupants thereof or of other land in the Flood Plain District. 
In deciding application for a Special Permit under this section, 
but without limiting the generality of the foregoing, the 
Board of Appeals shall find affirmatively: 

10.5.1.1 That the basement floor elevation for any structure having 
sustained living occupancy shall be at least 125 feet above 
Mean Seal Level, and the top of the foundation wall shall be 
at least 132 feet above Mean Sea Level. 

10.5.1.2 That structures be so designed and secured that during flood- 
ing: 

(a) The foundation would not be undermined. 

(b) The structure will not be floated, battered off nor swept 
away. 

10.5.1.3 That safe vehicular and pedestrian access to, over and from 
the premises is provided on ways having all elevations no less 
than 125 feet above Mean Sea Level. 

10.5.1.4 That because of the location, elevation or for other reasons, 
there will be no danger of pollution to public or onsite water 
facilities . 

10.5.1.5 That sewage, gas, electricity, fuel, and other utilities will 
be adequately protected from all hazards which may arise as a 
result of a severe flood. 

10.5.1.6 That the methods of drainage are adequate. 

10.5.1.7 That other land in the Flood Plain District is nevertheless 
protected against dimunition of value as a result of the 
proposed use of the premises. 

222 



10.5 ISSUANCE OF SPECIAL PERMITS 

10.5.2 If any land included in the Flood Plain District is found by 
the Board of Appeals not to be in fact subject to seasonal or 
periodic flooding, the Board of Appeals may grant a Special 
Permit for the use of such land for any purpose permitted in 
the underlying district. 



10.5.3 No building permit shall be issued until the Board of Health 
has issued a permit under this section approving the proposed 
sanitary and storm drainage system or has allowed forty-five 
(45) days to elapse after receipt of the application. 

10.5.4 No occupancy permit shall be issued until the Board of Appeals, 
the Building Inspector, the Board of Health, the Conservation 
Commission and the Planning Board have received a certified 
plan showing the foundation and floor elevations, grading of 
the premises, elevations of the complete structure and all 
elevations of the various elements that make up the sewage 
disposal system, and it is determined by each Board and the 
Building Inspector that all requirements of all permits are 
satisfied or 45 days have elapsed after the receipt of such 
plan by the Building Inspector and each Board and notification 
of the Building Inspector and each Board by the applicant for 
the completion of the work. 

10.5.5 In consideration of any of the items under "Section 10.5 - 
Issuance of Special Permits," the Board of Health and the 
Board of Appeals shall consider the minimum ground water level 
in the Flood Plain District to be 123 feet above Mean Sea Level, 
unless data indicates a higher ground. 

10.6 LIMITS OF AUTHORITY 

Nothing contained in this Section 10 shall limit the authority 
of the Board of Health with respect to premises in the Flood 
Plain District or limit the applicability of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts State Building Code to any structure in the 
Flood Plain District. 

10.7 The furnishing of all plans and specifications necessary to all Boards 
and authorities as required by this Section shall be the obligation of 
the applicant. Each Board or Authority shall immediately return to 
such applicant a dated receipt in duplicate describing the documents 
received. Such receipt shall be prima facie evidence of delivery and 
date of delivery. A copy of each receipt shall be presented to the 
Board of Appeals at least two weeks before the date set for the hearing 
of the application. 



223 



SECTION 11 
WATERSHED PROTECTION DISTRICT 



11.1 PURPOSE 



The purpose of this section is: 

a) To preserve and protect the streams and other water courses in the 
Town of Medfield and their adjoining lands. 

b) To protect the health and safety of persons and property against 
the hazards of flooding and contamination. 

c) To preserve and maintain the ground water table for water supply 
purposes. 

d) To protect the community against the detrimental use and develop- 
ment of lands adjoining such water courses. 

e) To conserve the watershed areas of the Town of Medfield for the 
health, safety and welfare of the public. 

11.2 DEFINITION 

11.2.1 The Watershed Protection District is superimposed over any 
other District established by this Bylaw. The Watershed 
Protection District is defined as all land area along the 
streams and brooks for a horizontal distance of at least 
25 feet from the normal high water line and adjacent low, 
marshy areas, as shown on the Zoning Map of the Town of 
Medfield. The names of the brooks included within the 
District are as follows: Great Pond Brook, Horse Brook, 
Mill Brook, Mine Brook, North Brook, Saw Mill Brook, 
Sewall Brook, South Plain Brook, Tubwreck Brook, Turtle 
Brook, Vine Brook, Winter Brook and Brooks "A" through 

"J" inclusive, as shown on the Zoning Map of the Town of 
Medfield. 

11.2.2 The Watershed Protection District shall include all land that 
lies within a horizontal distance of 25 feet from the normal 
high water line of the following major water bodies: Baker's 
Pond, Cemetery Pond, Chickering Lake, Danielson Pond, Echo 
Lake, Flynn's Pond, Holt's Pond, Jewell's Pond, June Pond, 
Kingsbury's Pond, Little Chickering Lake, Notch Pond, Parker's 
Pond and all other ponds that are shown on the Zoning Map of 
the Town of Medfield. 



11.3 USE 



11.3.1 Land in the Watershed Protection District may be used for any 
purpose otherwise permitted in the underlying district 
except that: 

11.3.1.1 No building permit shall be issued nor any building, wall, 

dam or other structure shall be erected, constructed, altered, 
enlarged or otherwise created or moved for any purpose unless 
a Special Permit is issued by the Board of Appeals. 

224 



11.3.1.2 Dumping, filling, excavating or transferring of any earth 
material within the District is prohibited unless a Special 
Permit is issued by the Board of Appeals. 

11.3.1.3 No ponds or pools shall be created or other changes in 
water courses allowed whether for swimming, fishing, or other 
recreational uses, agricultural uses, scenic features or 
drainage improvements or any other uses unless a Special 
Permit is issued by the Board of Appeals. 

11.3.2.1 Proper operation and maintenance of existing dams and other 
water control devices are permitted uses under this section. 
This includes the temporary alteration of the water level for 
emergency or maintenance purposes and the removal of any and 
all flashboards or a privately-owned dam in order to lower 
the water level. 

11.3.2.2 No new dams or other water-control devices shall be created 
unless a Special Permit is issued by the Board of Appeals. 

11.3.3 Municipal uses, such as waterworks, pumping stations and parks, 
are permitted under this section. 

11.4 APPLICATION FOR SPECIAL PERMIT 

11.4.1 Any person desiring a Special Permit for any use set out in 
Section 11.3.1 above within the Watershed Protection District 
shall submit an application to the Board of Appeals, in accord- 
ance with the Provisions of Chapter 40A of the Massachusetts 
General Laws as amended, and a copy thereof to the Building 
Inspector. The application shall be accompanied by plans of any 
construction and of the premises on which it is to be situated. 
All plans shall show existing and proposed finished ground con- 
tours at two-foot intervals. Contours shall be delineated within 
200 feet of the proposed construction. 

11.4.2 Copies of the application for Special Permit to the Board of 
Appeals with accompanying plans shall also be sent to the Build- 
ing Inspector, Board of Health, Conservation Commission and 
Planning Board for their recommendations to the Board of Appeals, 
as to their approval, disapproval or appropriate recommendations. 

11.4.3 All such plans shall be certified by a registered Land Surveyor 
or a Registered Professional Civil Engineer. 

11.5 ISSUANCE OF SPECIAL PERMITS 

11.5.1 The Board of Appeals, after holding a public hearing, shall issue 
a Special Permit under this section only if it finds that the use 
of the premises will not endanger the health or safety of the 
occupants thereof or of other land in the Watershed Protection 
District. In deciding upon applications for a Special Permit 
under this section, but without limiting the generality of the 
foregoing, the Board of Appeals shall find affirmatively: 

11.5.1.1 That the basement floor elevation for any proposed structure 
in a Watershed Protection District having sustained living 
occupancy shall be at least two feet above the elevation 

225 



of the surrounding Watershed Protection District and that the top 
of the foundation wall shall be at least nine feet above the 
elevation of the surrounding Watershed Protection District. 

11.5.1.2 That structures be so designed and secured that during flooding: 

a) The foundation would not be undermined. 

b) The structure will not be floated, battered off nor swept 
away. 

11.5.1.3 That safe vehicular and pedestrian access to, over and from the 
premises is provided on ways having all elevations no less than 
two feet above the elevation of the surrounding Watershed 
Protection District. 

11.5.1.4 That because of the location, elevation or for other reasons, 
there will be no danger of pollution to public or onsite 
water facilities. 

11.5.1.5 That sewage, gas, electricity, fuel, and other utilities will 
be adequately protected from all hazards which may arise as a 
result of a severe flood. 

11.5.1.6 That the methods of drainage are adequate. 

11.5.1.7 That other land in the Watershed Protection District is 
nevertheless protected against dimunition of value as a 
result of the proposed use of the premises. 

11.5.2 No building permit shall be issued until the Board of Health has 
issued a permit under this section approving the proposed sani- 
tary and storm drainage system or has allowed forty-five (45) 
days to elapse after receipt of the application. 

11.5.3 No occupancy permit shall be issued until the Board of Appeals, 
the Building Inspector, the Board of Health, the Conservation 
Commission and the Planning Board have received a certified plan 
showing the foundation and floor elevations, grading of the 
premises, elevations of the completed structure and all eleva- 
tions of the various elements that make up the sewage disposal 
system, and it is determined by each Board and the Building 
Inspector that all requirements of all permits are satisfied 

or 45 days have elapsed after the receipt of such plan by the 
Building Inspector and each Board and notification of the 
Building Inspector and each Board by the applicant for the 
completion of the work. 

11.5.4 In consideration of any of the items under "Section 11.5 - 
Issuance of Special Permits," the Board of Health and the Board 
of Appeals shall consider the minimum ground water level in the 
Watershed Protection District to be two feet below the natural 
elevations of the gound at location of the proposed construction, 
unless data indicates a higher ground water level. 

11.6 AREAS AND YARD REGULATIONS 

.-Lion of any lot in a Watershed Protection District may be used 

226 






used to meet the area and yard regulations for the District in which the 
remainder of the lot is situated provided that not more than 75% of the 
lot area is within the Watershed Protection District. 

11.7 WATER BODIES 

All water bodies encircled by the Watershed Protection District are 
hereby included within said District. 

11.8 LIMITS OF AUTHORITY 

Nothing contained in this Section 11 shall limit the authority of the 
Board of Health with respect to premises in the Watershed Protection 
District or limit the applicability of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
State Building Code to any structure in the Watershed Protection District 

11.9 The furnishing of all plans and specifications necessary to all Boards 
and authorities as required by this Section shall be the obligation of 
the applicant. Each Board of Authority shall immediately return to such 
applicant a dated receipt in duplicate describing the documents received 
Such receipt shall be prima facie evidence of delivery and date of 
delivery. A copy of each receipt shall be presented to the Board of 
Appeals at least two weeks before the date set for the hearing of the 
application. 

SECTION 12 
RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING EARTH REMOVAL USES 

12.1 REMOVAL 

12.1.1 The removal of earth from all zoning districts of the Town of 
Medfield shall be permitted only after special permission of 
the Board of Selectmen and under these rules and regulations. 
The Board of Selectmen shall grant no such permit as would in 
their opinion adversely affect the scheme of growth laid down 
in the Zoning Bylaw or elsewhere, or the economic status of the 
town, or tend to impair the beauty of the town, or of the dis- 
trict most immediately affected, or result in health or other 
hazards. 

12.2 APPLICATION 

12.2.1 All applications for approval or endorsement for the removal 
of earth in the Town of Medfield shall be made in accordance 
with the rules and regulations hereinafter set forth. 

12.2.2 Before an applicant can obtain a permit for the purpose of 
removing earth in the Town of Medfield, he shall present to 
the Board of Selectmen an original and five copies of a plan 
made by a Registered Engineer or Registered Land Surveyor, 
which shall show in detail the following information: 

12. 2. 2. a) All the property where earth is to be removed with the 
boundaries shown in detail. 

12.2.2.b) All buildings on said property and buildings within one 
hundred feet of said property lines. 

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L2 

12 
12 
12.3 SITE PLAN 



2.2.c) All adjacent roads, their elevations, and established grades. 

J.J.d) All adjacent waterways, brooks, swamps and their elevations. 

2.2.e) Contour lines for the entire property at two-foot intervals 
showing existing and proposed elevations. 



2.2.f) Any and all easements existing and proposed, public or private 

2.2.g) Any and all benchmarks. 

2.2.h) All land shall be divided into five-acre grids. 



The plan shall be drawn to a scale of 1" equals 40'. All profiles 
shall be drawn to a scale of 1" equals 8'. 

The Board of Selectmen after study may make such corrections and 
revisions as it deems advisable in the public interest. 

12.4 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

In approving the plan, the Board of Selectmen will require that the 
land shall be suitable for the removal of earth without danger to 
health and life and that proper steps are taken so as not to hinder 
or endanger traffic on public ways. The Board of Selectmen may re- 
quire, at its discretion, that police control of the traffic be pro- 
vided by the applicant at his expense. Only when the Selectmen find 
affirmatively that no public hazard or nuisance will result will they 
approve a plan for the removal of earth where intentions are shown for 
excavation below the level of an adjacent already-existing public way. 

12.5 PROCEDURE 

The Board of Selectmen will act upon application for approval of earth 
removal only when proper plans have been submitted with all information 
that is required clearly shown. 

Before approval is granted, a public hearing shall be held by the 
Board of Selectmen, notices of which shall be sent by certified or 
registered mail with return receipt to mortgagees if any, of the 
applicant's property and to all owners of property as appearing on 
the most recent tax list, any part of which lies within one hundred 
feet of the property of the applicant. 

12.6 PUBLICATION AND NOTICES 

12.6.1 The applicant shall arrange and pay for such publications and 
notices and shall deliver a list of said mortgagees, property 
owners, return receipts, and a copy of the paper containing the 
notice of the hearing to the Clerk of the Board of Selectmen 

at least twenty-four hours prior to the hearing. 

12.6.2 The notice shall appear in a paper of general circulation within 
the Town, once in each of two successive weeks, the first publi- 
cation at least fourteen (14) days before the day of the 
hearing. 

228 



12.6.3 The word "applicant" as used in these rules and regulations shall 
mean the owner of the property or his legal representative or per- 
sons authorized by owner. 

12.6.4 Corporations shall file with the Board of Selectmen a list of 
their officers and designate their authority to sign legal 
documents. 

12.7 BOND 

12.7.1 Before approval of any plan, and in order to insure the fulfill- 
ment of the following requirements, the Board of Selectmen will 
require a proper bond, or deposits of money, or negotiable 
securities on a scale of not less than $2,500 per acre, the exact 
amount to be set by the Board of Selectmen. 

12.7.2 Said bond or security shall be held by the Town of Medfield 
until all requirements of the Specifications have been complied 
with. The Board of Selectmen shall be the agent to enforce com- 
pliance with these rules and regulations, and upon satisfactory 
completion will release the security. 

12.7.3 No applicant will be allowed to work more than one five-acre grid 
at any one time. 

12.8 SPECIFICATIONS 

12.8.1 All work shall be done in accordance with the following 
specifications : 

12. 8.1. a) Trees are to be cut (not bulldozed). 

12.8.1.b) All trees, brush and stumps are to be chipped on the site, 

unless removed for commercial purposes. DISPOSAL BY BURNING 
NOT PERMITTED. 

12.8.1.c) All loam and subsoil must be bulldozed into piles for future 
respreading. No loam or subsoil may be removed from the 
property. 

12.8.1.d) Earth may be removed only to contours as specified by the' 

Board of Selectmen. In earth removal areas, ledge shall not 
be left exposed above the approved grade and boulders, when 
encountered, shall be buried at least such that their tops 
are six feet below the approved grade and in the event that 
ledge is encountered prior to reaching the approved grade, a 
revision of the approved grade plan must be immediately 
obtained . 

12.8.1.e) After the earth has been removed from the first five-acre grid 
and before proceeding to the next five-acre grid, excavation 
shall be graded to the approved grade and all loam and subsoil 
shall then be respread over the excavation, except in such 
areas as are required in subsequent operations. 

12.8.1. f) Rye grass shall be seeded on this reloamed area at the rate 
of two-hundred pounds per acre. 



229 



L2.8.1.g) Fingerling fir, white pine or other approved trees shall be 
planted over the entire area, five to six feet on centers. 

.S.l.h) Upon completion and approval by the Board of Selectmen of a 
five-acre grid, the security may be released in part or in 
whole or it may be advanced to the next grid. 

12.9 REMOVAL OF EARTH NOT INTENDED FOR BUSINESS 

12.9.1 Noncommercial removal of earth for the improvement of a person's 
property in an area not exceeding one acre will be allowed on a 
weekly permit upon such conditions and terms as specified by the 
Board of Selectmen. This type of permit must be renewed every 
seven days at a time and place set by the Board of Selectmen. 

12.9.2 If a violation of the terms of an earth removal permit occurs, 
the Selectmen shall forthwith revoke the permit and not renew it 
until the violation has been corrected to the satisfaction of the 
Board of Selectmen. 

12.9.3 These rules and regulations governing earth removal uses in the 
Town of Medfield shall not apply to operations that were in 
progress and operated on land owned by the applicant prior to 
April 9, 1938, except that the final grade of the land shall be 
approved by the Board of Selectmen immediately upon the approval 
of this Bylaw. 

12.9.4 The Board of Selectmen may delegate authority to inspect the 
earth removal operations under these rules and regulations. 

12.9.5 The Board of Selectmen shall reserve the right to limit the days 
and hours of operation and may require antidust treatment in those 
areas that, in the Board of Selectmen's opinion, require such 
treatment. 

12.9.6 The Board of Selectmen may also require additional surety to 
cover the cost of damage to existing town roadways or clean-up 
requirements caused by the earth removal operation. 

12.10 DEFINITION OF EARTH 

12.10.1 Earth as used in this section shall include all material 
fragmental or otherwise, normally composing part of the 
surface of the globe, excluding water. 



S ECTION 13 
ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT 

13.1 BUILDING INSPECTOR AND/OR ZONING ENFORCING OFFICER 

It shall be the duty of the Board of Selectmen to administer and 
enforce the provisions of this Bylaw. The Board of Selectmen may 
appoint as its agents, the Building Inspectors and Zoning Enforcinj 
Officers. 



230 



13.2 PERMIT REQUIRED 

It shall be unlawful for any owner or person to erect, construct, recon- 
struct, or alter a structure or change the use, increase the intensity 
of use, or extend or displace the use of any building, other structure 
or lot without applying for and receiving from the Building Inspectors 
or Zoning Enforcing Officers the required permit. For purposes of 
administration the application procedure involving a permit for a struc- 
ture or use may be made at the same time and combined with the permit 
required under the Building Code. In addition to the plot plans and 
drawings required by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Building 
Code (prepared and certified to be a professional engineer and/or land 
surveyor) , plans and information for signs and off-street parking and 
loading shall also be filed with the Building Inspector. An applica- 
tion for a permit in the Flood Plain or Watershed Protection Districts 
shown on the Zoning Map shall meet all requirements of Sections 10 and 
11. 

13.3 PREVIOUSLY APPROVED PERMIT S 

The status of previously approved permits shall be as determined by 
the Zoning Enabling Act. 

13.4 CERTIFICATE OF USE AND OCCUPANCY REQUIRED 

It shall be unlawful to use or occupy any structure or lot for which a 
permit is required herein until the owner applies for and receives from 
the Building Inspector a certificate of use and occupancy. 

13.5 PERMIT AND CERTIFICATE FEES 

Fees shall be established by the Board of Selectmen. 

13.6 SPECIAL PERMIT TIME LIMITS 

The recipient of a Special Permit shall apply for a building permit 
within 180 days of the date of authorization by the Board or the 
special permit will become null and void. Any work for which any 
permit has been issued by the Building Inspector shall be actively 
prosecuted within 90 days and completed within one year of the date 
of the issuance of the special permit. Any special permit issued for 
a project which is actively prosecuted for one year may be extended 
up to an additional year at the discretion of the Board of Selectmen. 

13.7 VIOLATIONS 

The Building Inspectors or Zoning Enforcing Officers shall serve a 
notice of "VIOLATION and ORDER" to any owner or person responsible 
for any violation of the provisions of the Bylaw or violation of any 
approved plan, information or certificate issued under the provisions 
of this Bylaw. Such order shall direct the discontinuance of the 
unlawful action, use or condition and the abatement of violation 
within a time to be specified by the Building Inspector or Zoning 
Enforcing Officer. Any owner who having been served with a notice 
and who ceases any work or other activity shall not leave any struc- 
ture or lot in a condition that is a hazard or menace to the public 
safety, health or general welfare. The Building Inspector shall have 
the power to require that premises be put in safe condition or such 

231 



ad it ion that he directs to bring them into conformity with this 
Bylaw. 

13.8 PROSECUTION OF VIOLATION 

If the notice of "VIOLATION and ORDER" is not complied with promptly, 
the Building Inspector or Zoning Enforcing Officer, shall request the 
Board of Selectmen to institute the appropriate action or proceeding 
at law or in equity to restrain and correct the violation. 

13.9 BOARD OF APPEALS 

There shall be a Board of Appeals of three members and one associate 
member appointed as provided in Section 14 of Chapter 40A of the 
General Laws, as amended, which shall act on all matters within its 
jurisdiction under this Bylaw in the manner prescribed in said section, 
subject always to the rule that it shall give due consideration to pro- 
moting the public health, safety, convenience, and welfare, and con- 
serving property values, that it shall permit no building or use 
injurious, noxious, offensive or detrimental to a neighborhood, and 
that it shall prescribe appropriate conditions and safeguards in each 
case. 

13.10 SPECIAL PERMITS 

Certain uses, structures or conditions are designated as SP in Section 
5, paragraph 5.4, Table of Use Regulations . These uses require a 
special permit from the Board of Appeals which may be obtained only 
by use of the following procedure. Special permits required by Section 
10 - Flood Plain District and Section 11 - Watershed Protection Dis- 
trict shall be exempt from the provisions of this Section 13.10 and 
shall be governed by the provisions of Sections 10 and 11 of this Bylaw. 

13.10.1 FORM OF APPLICATION 

Any person desiring to apply for a special permit hereunder shall 
submit an application in writing to the Board of Appeals with a 
copy to the Building Inspector, the Board of Health and the Planning 
Board. Each application shall contain the following information: 

a. The full name and address of the applicant. 

b. The full name and address of the record owner of the real 
estate concerning which the special permit is sought if different 
from the applicant. 

c. If the applicant is other than the record owner of the real estate, 
the nature of the applicant's interest in the real estate (i.e., 
lease, option to purchase, etc.). 

d. The street address and zone for the property concerning which a 
special permit is sought. 

e. A summary of any construction or change which the applicant 
intends to make to the property if the special permit is 
granted. 



232 



f. A plot plan showing the boundary lines of the premises and the 
locations of structures thereon. 

g. Plans showing any proposed construction, alterations or renova- 
tion of the premises for which the special permit is sought. 

h. If the proposed use contemplates removal or disturbance of any 
earth, topographical plans of the property shall be furnished 
which show existing and finished ground contours at two-foot 
intervals. 

i. A summary of applicant's reasons for seeking the special permit. 

The Board of Appeals may require from any applicant for a special 
permit such additional information as it may determine to be neces- 
sary to determine the effect of the proposed use upon neighboring per- 
sons and property, and upon the welfare of the Town. 

13.10.2 If no recommendations are received within three (3) weeks after the 
date on which a copy of the application is submitted to the Building 
Inspector, the Board of Health and the Planning Board, as required by 
Section 13.10.1 the Board of Appeals may assume that they have no 
comment to make on the application. 

13.10.3 HEARING 

The Board of Appeals shall, at the expense of the applicant, give 
notice of a public hearing as required by General Laws , Chapter 40A, 
Section 17, and shall after publication of said notice hold a public 
hearing on the application. The public hearing shall not be held 
until at least one (1) month has elapsed from the date of the filing 
of the application. The public hearing shall be conducted in accord- 
ance with the rules and procedures prescribed by the Board of Appeals 
as required by General Laws , Chapter 40A, Section 18. 

13.10.4 After the public hearing required by Section 13.10.3 has been con- 
cluded, the Board of Appeals may grant a special permit if it con- 
cludes that a special permit is warranted by the application and the 
evidence produced at the public hearing and if it makes the following 
specific findings of fact: 

a. In R-E, R-T, R-S and R-U Districts, the proposed use will not 
result in a public hazard due to substantially increased vehicular 
traffic or parking in the neighborhood. In deciding this, the 
Board shall find affirmatively that the road's structure, surround- 
ings and configuration are such as will support the added traffic 
safely. 

b. The proposed use will not have an adverse effect upon property 
values in the neighborhood. 

c. The proposed use is architecturally and aesthetically consistent 
with the other structures in the neighborhood. 

d. The proposed use will not create any hazard to public safety or 
health in the neighborhood. 

e. The proposed use will not create any danger of pollution to 
public or private water facilities. 

233 



f. The methods of drainage at the proposed site are adequate. 

g. If public sewage is not provided, plans for on-site sewage dis- 
posal systems are adequate and have been approved by the Board 
of Health. 

h. That no excessive noise, light or odor shall be emitted. 

i. That no nuisance shall be created. 

j . There is an adequate supply of potable water approved by the 
Board of Health or the Water and Sewer Board. 

13.10.5 CONDITION 

If the Board of Appeals elects to grant a special permit pursuant to 
this Section 13.10, it may impose conditions upon the granting there- 
of in its discretion. No building permit shall be granted for con- 
struction authorized by special permit granted hereunder until plans 
have been submitted to the Building Inspector which specify in de- 
tail the manner of compliance with any conditions set by the Board 
of Appeals. 

13.10.6 The Board shall also impose the conditions specified below for the 
following uses: 

13. 10. 6. a) For Open Area Residential Development of Land: 

(1) For the purpose of encouraging the preservation of open space 
and promoting the more efficient use of land in harmony with 
its natural features and within the general intent of the 
Zoning Bylaw, an owner or owners or their agent of a tract of 
land, may, in connection with the submission of a subdivision 
plan for Planning Board approval under the Subdivision Control 
Law, make application to the Board of Appeals for a Special 
Permit excepting his plan from the lot size and yard dimension 
regulations as required in the Zoning Bylaw. In no event, 
however, shall such permit operate as an exception from any 
other provision of this Bylaw. 

The owner or such agent shall at the same time file a copy of 
the application with all accompanying plans and Environmental 
Impact Statement with the Board of Health, the Water and 
Sewerage Board, the Conservation Commission and the Planning 
Board, which Boards shall, within thirty days from the date of 
receipt of such documents by them, file their written recom- 
mendations concerning said applications with the Board of 
Appeals. If no such recommendations are filed by any board 
within thirty days, said board shall have deemed to have 
no recommendation on the application. 

(2) After notice and public hearing, and after due consideration 
of recommendations required to be filed, the board may grant 
such a permit for residential use provided that: 

(i) It finds that the proposed plan will promote the purposes 
of this section; and 



234 



(ii) Not less than 25% of the area of the tract, exclusive 

of land set aside for road area and parking area, shall 
be Open Land; and 

(iii) The maximum number of lots permitted on a given piece of 
land shall be determined by reducing the total acreage of 
the proposed subdivision by the area of ponds as shown on 
Town of Medfield zoning map, but not deducting for street 
right-of-way, and by dividing the remaining area by the 
minimum lot area requirements of the zoning district in 
which the subdivision is to be located; and 

(iv) The size of the tract of land not less than ten times 
the minimum lot size permitted in the Zoning District 
in which the tract is located and land area of not more 
than fifty per cent of open land in the tract may be 
Flood Plain District, Watershed Protection District, 
or have a greater than twenty per cent slope; and 

(v) The entire development shall be serviced with a public 

water supply and a public sewer or an on-site sewage dis- 
posal system capable of processing in excess of 2,000 
gallons of sewage effluent per day and to which all units 
in the development shall be connected and which shall be 
approved by the Board of Health and Water and Sewerage 
Board; and 

(vi) To insure the protection of existing residences, pro- 
posed lots abutting lots with existing single family 
residences shall conform to the area requirements of the 
adjacent zone. The Board of Appeals may substitute a 
requirement for a buffer zone which shall be at least 
fifty feet in width for the protection of the abutting 
lots; and 

(vii) All lots adjoining existing ways shall meet all existing 
regulations for zoning districts in which the lots are 
located. Land adjoining existing ways may be used for 
open land, provided that its minimum dimension is fifty 
feet; and 

(viii) Minimum lot size shall be 12,000 square feet in area, 
100-foot width, 100-foot depth, 20-foot front yard, 
12-foot side yards and 30-foot rear yard. 



13.10a) (3) Open Land shall be 



(i) Owned by a membership corporation, trust or association whose 
members are all the owners or occupants of the dwelling units 
in the tract, by the Town, or otherwise as the Board may 
approve; and 

(ii) Restricted by a conservation restriction as defined in General 
Laws, Chapter 184, Sections 31, 32, and 33, running to the 
Town appropriate to retaining the Open Land predominantly in 
its natural scenic and open condition in such form as shall 
be approved by the Conservation Commission, the Planning Board, 
and the Board of Selectmen. The applicant shall provide 

235 



satisfactory assurance that such conservation restriction, 
following approvals, has been properly recorded in the appro- 
priate Registry of Deeds or Registry District and the interest 
in land thereby created is not subject to any mortgage, secur- 
ity, interest, lien or other monetary encumbrance of any kind 
other than the aforesaid conservation restriction; and 

(iii) Further restricted by covenants in deeds to all grantees in the 
tract for recreational, agricultural, conservation, or park 
uses on which no building may be erected more than fifteen feet 
in height and only incidental to the foregoing uses; and 

(iv) Open to such uses by at least the owners and occupants of the 
dwelling units in the tract; and 

(v) Open to Town officials for purposes of maintaining public 
facilities; and 

(vi) Subject to such further restrictions and conditions as the 
Board may impose. 

(4) A special permit for a cluster development issued hereunder by the 
Board of Appeals is primarily an authorization for the use of lots 
which have less than the normal lot size and yard dimension. 
Subsequent approval by the Planning Board of such portions of the 
development as constitute a subdivision will be required as set 
forth in the Subdivision Control Law, including approval of the 
street and utility systems. A favorable recommendation by the 
Planning Board that the special permit be issued shall not, there- 
fore, be deemed to either constitute subdivision approval under 
the Subdivision Control Law of the Subdivision Rules & Regulations 
or imply that such approval will be given. 

(5) Consistent with the general purposes of this Zoning Bylaw and the 
specific purposes of this action, the Planning Board may recommend, 
and the Board may impose, as conditions to the approval of a permit 
hereunder such provisions as to parking, loading, road construction 
and sidewalks, community service and recreational facilities, 
screening, and care and maintenance of Open Land as may be deemed 
advisable for the protection and well being of the occupants of 
dwelling units in the tract of the inhabitants of the Town. 

(6) No lot shown on a plan for which a permit is granted under this 
section may be further subdivided, and a notation to this effect 
shall be shown upon the subdivision plan recorded with the 
Registry of Deeds or Registry District. 

13. 10. 6. b) For the use of a travel trailer or mobile home located in any 
District provided; any travel trailer or mobile home shall not 
be used for more than six months; no wheels, tires or other 
means of keeping the travel trailer or mobile home mobile shall 
be removed; any travel trailer or mobile home shall have a current 
state motor vehicle license; and no skirts, porches, fences or 
similar materials or equipment shall be added to any travel 
trailer or mobile home which would detract from its mobility. 
Each travel trailer or mobile home and its lot shall be 
subject to the requirements of the District. 



236 



13. 10. 6. c) For the conversion to or location of a lodging house in the "R-U" 
District, provided: it shall be limited to not more than five 
persons; it shall be located in the principal building; official 
residence shall be maintained therein by the owner of the premises; 
it shall be used for nontransients only. 

13. 10. 6. d) For the use of a one-family dwelling in any "R" District for a 
home occupation, provided: not more than one nonresident shall 
be employed therein; not more than 500 square feet of floor area 
is devoted to such use; The use is carried on strictly within the 
principal building; not more than 40 percent of the existing floor 
area not to exceed 500 square feet is devoted to such use; that 
there shall be no display of goods or wares visible from the 
street; there shall be no advertising on the premises other than 
a small nonelectrical sign not to exceed one square foot in area 
and carrying only the name and occupation of any occupant of the 
premises such as physician, artisan, teacher, day nurse, lawyer, 
architect, engineer, clergyman, accountant, osteopath, dentist, 
and similar occupations or professions; the buildings or premises 
occupied shall not be rendered objectionable or detrimental to 
the residential character of the neighborhood due to the exterior 
appearance, emission of odor, gas, smoke, dust, noise, electrical 
disturbance or in any other way; the building shall include no 
features of design not customary in buildings for residential 
use. Such uses as clinics, barber shops, beauty parlors, tea 
rooms, real estate offices, tourist homes, animal hospitals, 
kennels, and others of a similar nature shall not be considered 
home occupations. 

13. 10. 6. e) For the planned business or industrial development of land for 
any permitted use in "B" or "B-I" District subject to a floor 
area ratio more than the maximum permitted in the Table of Area 
Regulations and less than the parking requirements contained in 
Section 8, provided: the tract in single or consolidated owner- 
ship at the time of application shall be at least three acres in 
size; a development plan shall be presented for the entire tract; 
the development shall be served by one common parking area, exit 
and entrance; the maximum floor area ratio shall not exceed 0.50; 
the reduction in parking space requirements shall not exceed by 
10 per cent or more the normal application requirements of the 
"B" or "B-I" District. 

13. 10. 6. f) For the manufacturing or other industrial use of any lot in any 

"I-E" District listed as an exception provided: the proposed use 
shall not emit any smoke of a shade darker than No. 2 on the 
Ringelmann Smoke Chart as published by the U.S. Bureau of Mines; 
no air pollution particle concentrations shall exceed 0.3 grains 
per cubic foot; all inflammable or radioactive liquids shall be 
stored underground; the discharge of wastes shall be into a 
public sewer or the system subject to written approval of the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health; vibration shall not 
exceed the safe range of Table 7, U.S. Bureau of Mines, Bulletin 
No. 442; there shall be no unusual or objectionable odor; no direct 
or sky-reflected glare shall be permitted and all materials shall 
be stored within a completely enclosed building. 



237 



13. 10. 6. g) For the use of land or the erection and use of any building or 
other structure in any District for a principal or accessory 
use where the provisions of this Bylaw cannot reasonably be inter- 
preted to provide anywhere in this Bylaw for such use, provided: 
the Board determines in each instance such use shall be essential 
to the general welfare of the Town; they shall be permitted only 
in a District where uses similar to the use shall be permitted; 
the use shall be subject to all provisions prescribed in this 
Bylaw for the District in which the similar use if provided 
for as a permitted use. 

13. 10. 6. h) For the enlargement of any nonconforming structure (not including 
a sign) beyond the maximum floor area ratio and yard regulations 
in any District, and the extension of the use thereof refer to 
Section 9. 

13. 10. 6. i) For alteration of single, two-family or multi-family dwelling 
to adapt them to additional limited multiple-family use upon 
the following conditions: 

13. 10. 6. i (1) That there will be no change in the existing district use and 
the approval shall automatically cease when the structure is 
removed. 

13. 10. 6. i (2) That a minimum floor space of five hundred (500) square feet 
per family unit be provided. 

13. 10. 6. i (3) That satisfactory off-street parking be provided. 

13. 10. 6. i (4) That each family unit be a complete housekeeping unit. 

13. 10. 6. i (5) That additions or appurtenances may not be added without the 
prior approval of the Board of Appeals, except for openings 
for ingress and egress, for necessary stairs and steps 
including shelters therefor, and for the housing of one 
motor vehicle per family unit. 

13. 10. 6. i (6) Other conditions that may lawfully be required by the Board of 
Health, the Building, Plumbing and Wiring Inspectors, and 
the Board of Appeals, consistent with the foregoing. 



13.11 VARIANC E 

The Board may authorize a variance for a particular use or parcel of 
land or to an existing building thereon from the terms of this Bylaw 
where, owing to conditions especially affecting such a building but 
not affecting generally the Zoning District in which it is located, 
a literal enforcement of the provisions of this Bylaw would involve 
substantial hardship, financial or otherwise, to the appellant, and 
where desirable relief may be granted without substantial detriment 
to the public good and without nullifying or substantially derogating 
from the intent or purpose of this Bylaw. In authorizing such 
variance the Board may impose limitations both of time and use, such 
as, but not limited to those specified in Subsections 13.10.1 and 
13.10.6(a) to (i) inclusive. A variance granting continuation of a 
use may be conditional upon compliance with regulations to be made 
and amended from time to time hereafter. 



238 



13.12 SITE PLAN APPROVAL 

13.12.1 No single-family, two-family, multi-family, business or indus- 
trial building shall hereafter be erected or externally en- 
larged, and no business or industrial use shall hereafter be 
established or expanded in ground area except in conformity 
with a site plan bearing an endorsement of approval by the 
Building Inspector or the Building Inspector and the Board of 
Appeals. 

13.12.2 The site plan shall show the following: 
13. 12. 2. a) Dimensions of the lot. 

13. 12. 2. b) All existing and proposed buildings and structures. 

13. 12. 2. c) Parking spaces, driveway openings, driveways, service 
areas, and open roads. 

13. 12. 2. d) Front, side and rear yard areas. 

13. 12. 2. e) All facilities for sewerage, refuse, and other waste dis- 
posal, and for surface water drainage. 

13. 12. 2. f) All landscape features, such as fences, walls, planting 
areas and walks. 

13. 12. 2. g) Zoning district or boundary of zoning districts if the lot 
extends into two or more districts. 

13.13 APPROVAL OF SITE PLAN 

Upon approval of the site plan, the owner or builder may apply for a 
Building Permit under the appropriate section of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts State Building Code. 

13.14 APPEAL PERIODS 

13.14.1 Any appeal to the Board of Appeals to any order or decision 
relative to this Bylaw shall be made in conformance with 
the conditions set out by the Zoning Enabling Act. All such 
appeals shall be conducted in accordance with the Zoning 
Enabling Act. 

13.14.2 Any person aggrieved by a decision of the Board of Appeals may 
petition the court within the period of time set forth in 

the Zoning Enabling Act. 

13.15 The furnishing of all plans and specifications necessary to all Boards 
and Authorities as required by this Section shall be the obligation of 
the applicant. Each Board or Authority shall immediately return to 
such applicant a dated receipt in duplicate describing the documents 
received. Such receipt shall be prima facie evidence of delivery and 
date of delivery. A copy of each receipt shall be presented to the 
Board of Appeals at least two weeks before the date set for the hearing 
of the application. 



239 



SECTION 14 
AMENDMENT, VALIDITY, REPEALER AND EFFECTIVE DATE 

14.1 A MENDMENT 

This Bylaw may be amended from time to time in accordance with the 
Zoning Enabling Act. 

During the amendment procedure subdivision plans in process of review 
by the Planning Board under the Subdivision Control Law shall be sub- 
ject to the provisions of the Zoning Enabling Act. 

14.2 VALIDITY 

The invalidity, unconstitutionality or illegality of any provision of 
this Bylaw or boundary shown on the Zoning Map shall not have any 
effect upon the validity, constitutionality or legality of any other 
provisions or boundary. 

14.3 REPEALER 

All previous Zoning Bylaws for the Town of Medfield, Massachusetts, 
are hereby repealed. 

14.4 EFFECTIVE DATE 

This Bylaw shall take effect upon the date resulting from the pro- 
cedure provided for in Section 32 of Chapter 40A of the General 
Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. (Planning Board) 



THIS ARTICLE WAS TABLED UNTIL AFTER CONSIDERATION OF 
ARTICLE 17 OF THE WARRANT. IT WAS ACTED UPON ON 
MAY 12, 1975. 

ARTICLE 1. Voted unanimously to substitute the Zoning Bylaw as printed 
for the existing Bylaw, upon approval of the Attorney General. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to enact the following Sewer 
Regulations : 

SEWER REGULATIONS 

Rules and regulations for the use of public sewers and drains, the 
installation and connection of building sewers, and the discharge of 
waters. and wastes into the public sewer system: and providing penalties 
for violations thereof: In the Town of Medfield, County of Norfolk, 
State of Massachusetts. 

Article 1 

DEFINITIONS 

Unless the context specifically indicates otherwise, the meaning of 
terms used in these regulations shall be as follows: 

Section 1. "BOD" (denoting Biochemical Oxygen Demand) shall mean the 

quantity of oxygen utilized in the biochemical oxidation of 

240 



organic matter under standard laboratory procedure in five (5) 
days at 20°C, expressed in milligrams per liter. 

Section 2. "Board" shall mean the Water and Sewerage Board of the Town of 
Medfield. 

Section 3. "Building Drain" shall mean that part of the lowest horizontal 

piping of a drainage system which receives the discharge from soil, 
waste, and other drainage pipes inside the walls of the buildings 
and conveys it to the building sewer, beginning five feet outside 
the inner face of the building wall. 

Section 4. "Building Sewer" shall mean the extension from the building drain 
to the public sewer or other place of disposal. 

Section 5. "Garbage" shall mean solid wastes from the domestic and commercial 
preparation, cooking, and dispensing of food, from the handling, 
storage, and sale of produce. 

Section 6. "Industrial Wastes" shall mean the liquid wastes from industrial 
manufacturing processes, trade, or business as distinct from 
sanitary sewage. 

Section 7. "Person" shall mean any individual, firm, company, association, 
society, corporation, or group. 

Section 8. "pH" shall mean the logarithm of the reciprocal of the weight of 
of hydrogen ions in grams per liter of solution. 

Section 9. "Properly Shredded Garbage" shall mean the wastes from the prepara- 
tion, cooking, and dispensing of food that have been shredded to 
such a degree that all particles will be carried freely under 
the flow conditions normally prevailing in public sewers, with no 
particle greater than one-half (1/2) inch, in any dimension. 

Section 10. "Public Sewer" shall mean a sewer in which all owners of abutting 

properties have equal rights, and is controlled by public authority, 

Section 11. "Sanitary Sewer" shall mean a sewer which carries sewage and to 
which storm, surface, and ground waters are not intentionally 
admitted. 

Section 12. "Sanitary Sewage" shall mean the water-carried wastes from 

residences, business buildings, institutions, and industrial es- 
tablishments, but excludes ground, surface, storm-waters, un- 
polluted cooling water, and industrial wastes as defined in 
Section 6 above. 

Section 13. "Sewage Treatment Plant" shall mean any arrangement of devices and 
structures used for treating sewage. 

Section 14. "Sewage Works" shall mean all facilities for collecting, pumping, 
treating, and disposing of sewage. 

Section 15. "Sewer" shall mean a pipe or conduit for carrying sewage. 

Section 16. "Shall" is mandatory: "May" is permissive. 



241 



Loci 1~. "Slug" shall mean any discharge of water, sewage, or industrial 
waste which in concentration of any given constituent or in 
quantity of flow exceeds for any period of duration longer than 
fifteen (15) minutes more than five (5) times the average twenty- 
four hour concentration or flows during normal operations. 

Section 18. "Storm Drain" (sometimes termed "storm sewer") shall mean a 

sewer which carries storm and surface waters and drainage, but 
excludes sewage and industrial wastes, other than unpolluted 
cooling water. 

Section 19. "Superintendent" shall mean the Superintendent, Streets, Water 
and Sewers of the Town of Medfield, or his authorized deputy, 
agent, or representative. 

Section 20. "Suspended Solids" shall mean solids that either float on the 
surface of, or are in suspension in water, sewage, or other 
liquids, and which are removable by laboratory filtering. 

ARTICLE II 
Building Sewers and Connections 

Section 1. No person other than a qualified sewer layer duly licensed by the 
Town of Medfield shall construct or repair any building sewer or 
make any connections with or opening into, use, alter or disturb 
any public sewer or appurtenance. 



Section 



Any person proposing a new discharge into the system or a sub- 
stantial change in the volume or character of pollutants that 
are being discharged into the system shall notify the Superin- 
tendent at least forty-five (45) days prior to the proposed 
change or connection. 



Section 3. A permit shall be obtained from the Superintendent before any 
building sewer may be constructed or connected to the public 
sewer. 

Section 4. There shall be two (2) classes of building sewer permits: (a) for 
residential and commercial service, and (b) for service to estab- 
lishments producing industrial wastes. In either case, the owner 
or his agent shall make application on a special form furnished 
by the Town. The permit application shall be supplemented by 
plans, specifications, or other information considered pertinent 
in the judgment of the Board, Board of Health and Plumbing 
Inspector. A permit and inspection fee of $25 for a residential 
building sewer permit; $25 for each residential unit for a multi- 
family residential building sewer permit, $50 for each 5,000 
square feet or fraction thereof for a commercial building sewer 
permit and $100 for an industrial building sewer permit, shall 
be paid to the Town at the time the application is filed. 

Section 5. All costs and expense incident to the installation and connection 
of the building sewer shall be borne by the owner. The owner 
shall indemnify the Town from any loss or damage that may 
directly or indirectly be occasioned by the installation of the 
building sewer. 



242 



Section 6. A separate and independent building sewer shall be provided for 
every building except where one building stands at the rear of 
another on an interior lot and no building sewer can be constructed 
to the rear building through an adjoining alley, court, yard or 
driveway, the building sewer from the front building may be ex- 
tended to the rear building and the whole considered as one 
building sewer. 

Section 7. Old buildings sewers may be used in connection with- new buildings 
only when they are found, on examination and test by the Superin- 
tendent, to meet all requirements of these regulations. 

Section 8. The size, slope, alignment, materials of construction of a build- 
ing sewer, and the methods to be used in excavating, placing of 
the pipe, jointing, testing, and backfilling the trench shall all 
conform to the requirements of the "Installation Specifications 
for Sewers" of the Board. 

Section 9. Whenever possible, the building sewer shall be brought to the 
building at an elevation below the basement floor. In all 
buildings in which any building drain is too low to permit 
adequate gravity flow to the public sewer, sanitary sewage 
carried by such building drain shall be lifted and discharged to 
the building sewer by means approved by the Board. 

Section 10. No person shall make connection of roof downspouts, exterior 

foundation drains, areaway drains, or other sources of surface 
runoff or groundwater to a building sewer or building drain 
which in turn is connected directly or indirectly to a public 
sanitary sewer. 

Section 11. The connection of the building sewer into the public sewer shall 
conform to the requirements of the "Installation Specifications 
for Sewers" of the Town. All such connections shall be made 
gastight and watertight. Any deviation from the prescribed pro- 
cedures and materials must be approved by the Superintendent 
before installation. 

Section 12. The applicant for the building sewer permit shall notify the 

Superintendent when the building sewer is ready for inspection 
and connection to the public sewer. The connection shall be 
made under the supervision of the Superintendent or his 
representative. 

Section 13. All excavations for building sewer installation shall be adequate- 
ly guarded with barricades and lights so as to protect the public 
from hazard. Streets, sidewalks, parkways and other public 
property distrubed in the course of the work shall be restored 
in a manner satisfactory to the Superintendent. 

ARTICLE III 
Use of the Public Sewers 

per. t ion 1. No person shall discharge or cause to be discharged any storm 
water, surface water, groundwater, roof runoff, subsurface 
drainage, uncontaminated cooling water or unpolluted industrial 
process waters to any sanitary sewer. 



243 



. No person shall discharge or cause to be discharged any of the 
following described waters or wastes to any public sewers: 

(a) Any gasoline, benzene, naphtha, fuel oil or other flammable 
or explosive liquid, solid or gas. 

(b) Any waters or wastes containing toxic or poisonous solids, 
liquids or gases in sufficient quantity, either singly or by 
interaction with other wastes, to injure or interfere with any 
sewage treatment process, constitute a hazard to humans or ani- 
mals, create a public nuisance, or create any hazard in the 
receiving waters of the sewage treatment plant, including but 
not limited to cyanides in excess of two (2) mg/1 as CN in the 
wastes as discharged to the public sewer. 

(c) Any waters or wastes having a pH lower than 5.5, higher 
than 9.5 or having any other corrosive property capable of 
causing damage or hazard to structures, equipment and personnel 
of the sewage works. 

(d) Solid or viscous substances in quantities or of such size 
capable of causing obstruction to the flow in sewers, or other 
interference with the proper operation of the sewage works such 
as, but not limited to ashes, cinders, sand, mud, straw, shav- 
ings, metal, glass, rags, feathers, tar, plastics, wood, un- 
ground garbage, whole blood, paunch manure, hair and fleshings, 
entrails, paper dishes, cups, milk containers, etc., either 
whole or ground by garbage grinders. 

Section 3. No person shall discharge or allow to be discharged the following 
described substances: materials, waters, or wastes if it appears 
likely in the opinion of the Board that such wastes can harm 
either the sewers, sewer treatment process, or equipment, have an 
adverse effect on the receiving stream, or can otherwise endanger 
life, limb, public property or constitute a nuisance. In forming 
its opinion as to the acceptability of these wastes, the Board 
will give consideration to such factors as the quantities of 
subject wastes in relation to flows and velocities in the sewers, 
materials of construction of the sewers, nature of the sewage 
treatment process, capacity of the sewage treatment plant, degree 
of treatability of wastes in the sewage treatment plant, and 
other pertinent factors. 

The substances prohibited are: 

(a) Any liquid or vapor having a temperature higher than one 
hundred fifty (150)° F. 

(b) Any water or waste containing fats, wax, grease or oils 
whether emulsified or not, in excess of one hundred (100) 
mg/1 or containing substances which may solidify or become 
viscous at temperatures between thirty-two (32) and one hundred 
fifty (150)°F. 

(c) Any garbage that has not been properly shredded. The 
installation and operation of any garbage grinder equipped 
with a motor of three-fourths (3/4) horse-power or greater 
must be reported to the Board for approval. 

244 






(d) Any waters or wastes containing strong acid, iron pickling 
wastes or concentrated plating solutions whether neutralized or 
not. 

(e) Any waters or wastes containing iron, chromium, copper, zinc 
and similar objectionable or toxic substances; or wastes exert- 
ing an excessive chlorine requirement, to such degree that any 
such material received in the composite sewage at the sewage 
treatment works exceed the limits established by the Board for 
such materials as set out in the permit. 

(f) Any waters or wastes containing phenols or other taste or 
odor-producing substances, in such concentrations exceeding 
limits which may, after treatment of the composite sewage, fail 
to meet the requirements of the State, Federal or other public 
agencies of jurisdiction for such discharge to the receiving 
waters . 

(g) Any radioactive wastes or isotopes of such half-life or con- 
centration as may exceed limits established by the Board in com- 
pliance with applicable State or Federal regulations. 

(h) Materials which exert or cause: 

(1) Unusual concentrations of inert suspended solids (such 
as, but not limited to, Fullers earth, lime slurries, 
and lime residues) or of dissolved solids (such as, but 
not limited to, sodium chloride and sodium sulfate). 

(2) Excessive discoloration (such as, but not limited to dye 
wastes and vegetable tanning solutions). 

(3) Unusual BOD, chemical oxygen demand, or chlorine require- 
ments in such quantities as to constitute a significant 
load on the sewage treatment works. 

(4) Unusual volume of flow or concentration of wastes con- 
stituting "slugs" as defined herein. 

(i) Waters or wastes containing substances which are not amen- 
able to treatment or reduction by the sewage treatment processes 
employed, or are amenable to treatment only to such a degree 
that the sewage treatment plant effluent cannot meet the require- 
ments of other agencies having jurisdiction over discharge to 
the receiving waters. 

Section 4. If any waters or wastes are discharged, or are proposed to be dis- 
charged to the public sewers, which waters contain the substances 
or possess the characteristics enumerated in Section 3 of this 
Article, and which in the judgment of the Board, may have a dele- 
terious effect upon the sewage works, processes, equipment or re- 
ceiving waters, or which otherwise create a hazard to life or 
constitute a public nuisance, the Board may: 

(a) Reject the wastes, 

(b) Require pretreatment to an acceptable condition for discharge 
to the public sewers, 

(c) Require control over the quantities and rates of discharge, 
and/or 

245 



(d) Require payment to cover the added costs of handling and 

I ating the wastes not covered by existing taxes or sewer 
charges under the provisions of Section 9 of this Article. 
If the Board permits the pretreatment or equalization of 
waste flows, the design and installation of the plants and 
equipment shall be subject to the review and approval of the 
Board, and subject to the requirements of all applicable codes 
ordinances and laws. 

(e) No septic tank or cesspool cleanings or tank trucks or other 
waste shall be discharged to the system except at the grit 
chamber provided at the treatment plant. This shall be done 
at periods specified and under conditions prescribed by the 
Board. 

(1) Only contractors having a valid permit issued by the Board of 
Health and signed receipts for their effluent will be allowed 
to discharge at the treatment plant. 

Section 5. Grease, oil and sand interceptors shall be provided when, in the 
opinion. of the Board, they are necessary for the proper handling 
of liquid wastes containing grease in excessive amounts, or any 
flammable wastes, sand or other harmful ingredients; except that 
such interceptors shall not be required for private living quar- 
ters or dwelling units. All interceptors shall be of a type and 
capacity approved by the Board, and shall be located as to be 
readily and easily accessible for cleaning and inspection. 

Section 6. Where preliminary treatment or flow-equalizing facilities are 
provided for any waters or wastes, they shall be maintained 
continuously in satisfactory and effective operation by the 
owner at his expense. 

Section 7. When required by the Board, the owner of any property serviced 
by a building sewer carrying industrial wastes shall install a 
suitable control manhole together with necessary meters and other 
appurtenances in the building sewer to facilitate observation, 
sampling, and measurement of the wastes. Such manhole, when re- 
quired, shall be accessibly and safely located, and shall be con- 
structed in accordance with plans approved by the Board. The 
manhole and equipment shall be installed by the owner at his ex- 
pense, and shall be maintained by him so as to be safe, access- 
ible and in good operating condition at all times. The records 
from the meters and measuring devices shall be furnished to the 
Board on request. 

on 8. All measurements, tests and analyses of the characteristics of 
waters and wastes to which reference is made in this ordinance 
shall be determined in accordance with the latest edition of 
"Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater", 
published by the American Public Health Association, and shall 
be determined at the control manhole provided, or upon suitable 
samples taken at said control manhole. In the event that no 
.1 manhole has been required, the control manhole shall 
be considered to be the nearest downstream manhole in the public 
sewer to the point at which the building sewer is connected. 

►ling shall be carried out by customarily accepted methods to 
reflect the effect of constituents upon the sewage works and to 
.<■ existence of hazards to life, limb and property. 

246 



(a) All industries discharging into a public sewer shall perform 
such monitoring of their discharges as the Superintendent may 
reasonably require, including installation, use and maintenance of 
monitoring equipment, keeping records and reporting the results of 
such monitoring to the Superintendent. Such records shall be made 
available upon request by the Superintendent to other Agencies 
having jurisdiction over discharges to the receiving waters. 

Section 9. No statement contained in this article shall be construed as pre- 
venting any special agreement or arrangement between the Town and 
any industrial concern whereby an industrial waste of unusual 
strength or character may be accepted by the Town for treatment, 
subject to payment therefore, by the industrial concern. 



ARTICLE IV 
Protection from Damage 

Section 1. No person shall maliciously, willfully, or negligently break, 
damage, destroy, uncover, deface or tamper with any structure, 
appurtenance or equipment which is a part of the sewage works. 
Any person violating this provision shall be subject to immediate 
arrest under charge of disorderly conduct. 



ARTICLE V 
Powers and Authority of Inspectors 

Section 1. Duly authorized employees of the Town bearing proper credentials 
and identification shall be permitted to enter all properties for 
the purposes of inspection, observation, measurement, sampling and 
testing in accordance with the provisions of these regulations. 
These persons shall have no authority to inquire into any processes 
including metallurgical, chemical, oil, refining, ceramic, paper or 
other industries beyond that point having a direct bearing on the 
kind and source of discharge to the sewers or waterways or facil- 
ities for waste treatment. 

Section 2. Duly authorized employees of the Town bearing proper credentials 

and identification shall be permitted to enter all private proper- 
ties through which the Town holds an easement for the purposes of, 
but not limited to, inspection, observation, measurement, sampling, 
repair and maintenance of any portion of the sewage works lying 
within said easement. All entry and subsequent work, if any, on 
said easement, shall be done in full accordance with the terms of 
the easement pertaining to the private property involved- 



ARTICLE VI 
Penalties 

Section 1. Any person found to be violating any provision of these regulation; 
except Article IV shall be served by the Town with written notice 
stating the nature of the violation and providing a reasonable 
time limit for the satisfactory correction thereof. The offender 
shall, within the period of time stated in such notice, permanent- 
ly cease all violations. 



247 



Loo 2. Any person who shall continue any violation beyond the time limit 
provided for in Article VI, Section 1, shall be guilty of a mis- 
demeanor, and on conviction thereof shall be fined in the amount 
not exceeding twenty (20) dollars for each violation. Each day 
in which any such violation shall continue shall be deemed a 
separate offense. 

Section 3. Any person violating any of the provisions of these regulations 
shall become liable to the Town for any expense, loss or damage 
occasioned the Town by reason of such violation. 



ARTICLE VII 
Validity 

Section 1. All regulations or parts of regulations in conflict herewith are 
hereby repealed. 

Section 2. The invalidity of any section, clause, sentence or provisions 

of these regulations shall not affect the validity of any other 
part of these regulations which can be given effect without such 
invalid part or parts. 



ARTICLE VIII 
Regulation in Force 

Section 1. These regulations shall be in full force and effect from and after 
its passage, approval, recording and publication as provided by 
law. 

Section 2. Passed and adopted by the Water and Sewerage Board of the Town of 
Medfield, State of Massachusetts, on the 25th day of February 1975 



ARTICLE IX 
Appeals 

Section 1. Any person aggrieved by any order or decision of the Superintendent 
may file an appeal in writing to the Board within twenty-one (21) 
days of said order or decision. Within fourteen (14) days of 
receipt of such appeal, the Board shall hold a hearing on the 
appeal and within ten (10) days thereafter shall render its 
decision. Such decision shall be final. (Water & Sewerage Board) 

ARTICLE 2. Voted to enact the Sewer Regulation as printed in the warrant. 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
and/or the Conservation Commission to acquire by purchase or eminent domain 
a lot identified as lot 8, map 34 of the Medfield Assessors' maps containing 
5.6 acres and a lot identified as lot 12, map 39 of the Medfield Assessors' 
maps containing 15.1 acre9, located off Philip Street from the Robert Sever 
Hale Camping Reservation Inc., and vote to transfer from available funds 
and/or borrow a sum of money for the purposes of this article and that the 
Board of Selectmen and/or the Conservation Commission be authorized to apply 
for and receive any Federal and State reimbursement funds that may be avail- 
able for the purpose, or take any action relative thereto. (Conservation Com.) 

248 



ARTICLE 3. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
and/or the Conservation Commission to acquire by purchase or eminent domain 
a lot identified as lot 68, map 333 of the Medfield Assessors' maps containing 
19.2 acres, located off Grace Drive from the Robert Sever Hale Camping Reser- 
vation, Inc. , and vote to transfer from available funds and/or borrow a sum of 
money for the purposes of this article and that the Board of Selectmen and/or 
the Conservation Commission be authorized to apply for and receive any Federal 
and State reimbursement funds that may be authorized for this purpose, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

ARTICLE 4. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 5. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to transfer from avail- 
able funds for the purposes of purchasing two (2) traffic counters complete 
with cord and accessories for use of the police and highway departments, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. (Police Department) 

ARTICLE 5. Voted that the sum of $1400 be transferred from free cash for 
the purchase of two traffic counters complete with cord and 
accessories for the use of the Police and Highway Departments. 

ARTICLE 6. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to transfer from the 
Police School Traffic (Alll-06-100) account to the Police Communication 
account (Alll-04-200) or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Police Dept.) 

ARTICLE 6. Voted that the sum of $1000 be transferred from the Police School 
Traffic (Alll-06-100) account to the Police Communications 
(Alll-04-200) account. 

ARTICLE 7. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to transfer from avail- 
able funds to the Alll-03-200 Cruiser Operations account, or do or act any- 
thing in relation thereto. (Police Department) 

ARTICLE 7. Voted that the sum of $1300 be transferred from free cash to the 
Alll-03-200 Cruiser Operations account. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money to the 
Water Department budget A140-00-200 series to defray expenses for the opera- 
tions of the Water Department for the remainder of the year, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. (Water Department) 

ARTICLE 8. Voted that the sum of $10,886 be transferred from free cash to 

the Water Department budget A140-00-200 Series to defray expenses 
for the operation of the Water Department for the remainder of 
the fiscal year. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from avail- 
able funds to the Street Lights A123-00-200 Account, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 9. Voted to transfer the sum of $2000 from free cash to the Street 
Lighting Account A123-00-200 Operations. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from 
available funds to the Group Insurance A155-04-200 account, or take any 
action relative thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

249 



ARTICLE 10. Voted that the sum of $3500 be transferred from the unexpended 

balance of Vehicles Insurance A155-01-200 Operations Account and 
the sum of $2257 from the unexpended balance of Property & 
Liability Insurance A155-03-200 Operations account to the Group 
Insurance A155-02-200 Operations Account for the purpose of 
this article. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from 
available funds to the Workmen's Compensation Insurance A155-02-200 Account, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 11. Voted to transfer the sum of $7225 from the unexpended balance 
of the Property & Liability Insurance Account A155-03-200 
Operations to the Workmen's Compensation Insurance A155-02-200 
Operations Account for the purposes of this article. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from 
available funds to defray the expenses of operating the public schools or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. (School Committee) 

ARTICLE 12. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a 
sum of money for the purchase of a mowing attachment for the Street Depart- 
ment Ford Diesel Tractor, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 13. Voted to transfer the sum of $1750 from free cash to the 

Highway Department Maintenance A110-04-500 Account to provide 
for the purchase of a Mowing attachment for the Street Depart- 
ment diesel tractor. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to aurhorize the Treasurer to pay 
hourly paid employees retroactively for the Martin Luther King Holiday on 
January 15, 1975, or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 14. Voted to authorize the Treasurer to pay the hourly paid 

employees retroactively for the Martin Luther King Holiday. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a 
sum of money for the purpose of conducting an "Outreach", or youth counseling, 
program under the general supervision of the Board of Health, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. (Board of Health) 

ARTICLE 15. Voted to transfer the sum of $6000 from free cash to the Board 
of Health budget for the purpose of conducting an "Outreach" 
or youth counseling program. 

The meeting was then adjourned and reconvened on May 12, 1975, at the Dale 
Street School Auditorium. Article 1 was then acted upon and passed 
unanimously. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds 

and/or borrow a sum of money to install an 8-inch water main for a distance 

of approximately 900 feet along Stagecoach Road to Lakewood Drive, or take 

any action relative thereto. . . 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 16. Voted to dismiss this article. 



250 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and/ 
or borrow a sum of money to install an 8-inch water main on. South Street for a 
distance of approximately 2400 feet parallel to the existing 6-inch line, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 17. Voted to dismiss this article. 

The meeting was dissolved. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven 
days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, 
unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this 15th day of April A.D. Nineteen hundred and 
seventy five. 

Howiy A. KeJtZeh&i 

hvthuJi L. Foaacla 
R. EdiAJaAd Bm/id 

Selectmen of Medfield 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Medfield, Massachusetts 
April 18, 1975 



Norfolk, ss 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections to meet at the time and for 
the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said warrant in not less 
than five public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven days before the 
time of holding the meeting. 

WWtixtm H. Mann, 
Constable of Medfield 



251 



July 24, 1975 



Boston, Massachusetts 



The foregoing amendment to zoning by-laws adopted May 1, 1975 under 
Article 1 of the warrant is hereby approved subject to the exception that 
the provision of 9.5.1 is deleted. 



FiancAA X. ZdULotJJL 
Attorney General 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
TOWN WARRANT 

TOWN WARRANT 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in 
town affairs, to meet at the Dale Street School Auditorium in said Medfield 
on Monday the 3rd day of November A.D. 1975 at 7:30 p.m. then and there to 
act on the following articles: 

The meeting was called to order at 7:35 p.m. by Ralph Copeland, Moderator, 
after ascertaining that a quorum of 250 voters were present. After the salute 
to the flag, action was taken on the following articles: 



252 



ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend the vote of the Town Meeting 
under Article 10 of the 1974 Annual Town Meeting by deleting the words, "pro- 
vided that the total authorized appropriation shall be reduced by the amount 
of any state or federal grants received," or take any other action relating 
thereto. (Conservation Commission) 

ARTICLE 1. Voted that the vote under Article 10 of the warrant for the 
1974 Annual Town Meeting be amended by deleting the words, 
"provided that the total authorized appropriation shall be 
reduced by the amount of any state or federal grants received" 
and by adding after the words "the fee or any lesser interest" 
the words "including such lease hold or life tenancy interest 
as the Selectmen shall determine, if any." 

Yes 407 
No 1 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation Commis- 
sion to purchase or otherwise acquire, and will authorize the Selectmen to 
take by eminent domain, upon the written request of the Conservation Commission, 
for conservation purposes including outdoor recreation as provided by Section 
8C of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, as amended, any fee, easement or con- 
servation restriction as defined in Section 31 of Chapter 184 of the General 
Laws, or other interest in land shown as lots 13 and 14 on Assessors' Map 10 
of the Town of Medfield, now or formerly of Robert W. Ramsdell, et al; vote to 
appropriate a sum of money for the purposes of this article and determine 
whether the money shall be provided by borrowing or otherwise; vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen or Conservation Commission to apply for and 
receive any Federal and State reimbursement funds that may be available; or 
take any action relative thereto. (Conservation Commission) 

ARTICLE 2. Voted that the Conservation Commission be authorized to purchase 
or otherwise acquire, and the Selectmen be authorized to take 
by eminent domain, upon written request of the Conservation Com- 
mission, for conservation purposes including outdoor recreation 
as provided by Section 8C of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, 
any fee, easement or conservation restriction as defined in 
Section 31 of Chapter 184 of the General Laws or other interest 
in land shown as Lots 13 and 14 on Assessor's Map 10 of the 
Town of Medfield, now or formerly of Robert W. Ramsdell, et al; 
and that to raise such amount the treasurer with the approval 
of the Selectmen be authorized to borrow $55,000 under Chapter 
44 Section 7(3) as amended; and that the Board of Selectmen or 
Conservation Commission be authorized to apply for and receive 
any federal and state reimbursement funds that may be available. 

Yes 401 
No 9 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to delete the present classifications 
and rates for "Custodian, Town Hall", "Custodian, Park and Recreation", and 
'Custodian & Maintenance, Library" in the Personnel Administration Plan and 
substitute the following under Full Time Positions: 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 
Municipal Buildings 

Custodian $3.67 $3.85 $4.04 $4.24 $4.45 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Personnel Board) 

253 



ARTICLE 3. Voted that the Personnel Administration Plan be amended by delet- 
ing the present classification and rates for "Custodian, Town 
Hall", "Custodian, Park and Recreation", and "Custodian and Main- 
tenance, Library" and that the following be substituted under 
Full Time Positions: 

2nd 3rd 4th 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT Minimum Step Step Step Maximum 

Municipal Buildings 

Custodian $3,67 $3.85 $4.04 $4.24 $4.45 

ARTICLE 4. To see what sum the Town will vote to transfer from available funds 
to the Library A135-00-400 - Other Charges & Credits account, or take any 
other action relative thereto. (Trustees of Memorial Public Library) 

ARTICLE 4. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way Carol Ann 
Drive from Station 0+0 to Station 6+46.04 as laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to in the Order of Layout on file 
with the Town Clerk's office and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to ac- 
quire by eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, titles and easements, inclu- 
ding drainage easements as may be necessary to accomplish such purposes and to 
authorize and direct the Selectmen to proceed with the completion of the con- 
struction of said way in accordance with the Subdivision Rules and Regulations 
of the Town, and to transfer a sum of money from available funds for the pur- 
poses of this article, or take any other action relative thereto. (Board of 
Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 5. Voted that Carol Ann Drive from Station 0+0 to Station 6+46.04 
as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans 
referred to in the Order of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's 
office be accepted as a way and that the Board of Selectmen be 
authorized to acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such 
rights, titles and easements, including drainage easements as 
may be necessary to accomplish such purposes and that the 
Board of Selectmen be authorized and directed to proceed with the 
completion of the construction of said way in accordance with 
the Subdivision Rules & Regulations of the Town and that the sum 
of $ 16,000 be transferred from free cash for the purposes of 
this article. 

Yes 382 
No 36 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or trans- 
fer from available funds a sum of money to the Alll-05-200 Street Signs and 
Traffic Marking account or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Police 
Department) 

ARTICLE 6. Voted that the sum of $675.80 be transferred from free cash to 
the Alll-05-200 Street Signs and Traffic Marking account. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or trans- 
fer from available funds and/or borrow a sum of money for the purpose of 
recreational development of Cpl. Stephen Hinkley Memorial Park, and to 
authorize the Park and Recreation Commission to apply for and receive any 
Federal and State funds which may be available for this purpose, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. (Park and Recreation Commission) 



254 



ARTICLE 7. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from avail- 
able funds to be used for development of community gardens, or take any other 
action relating thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 8. Voted that the sum of $500 be transferred from free cash to be 
used for filling, grading and restoring that site owned by the 
Town which was formerly used for sewer beds and that the Select- 
men be authorized to permit use of the site for community gardens 
by the residents of the Town upon such terms as the Selectmen 
find to be in the best interests of the Town. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from avail- 
able funds to the Town Report A160-00-200 Operations Account, or take any other 
action relating thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 9. Voted to dismiss this article. 

RESOLUTION proposed by the Board of Selectmen and Development and Industrial 
Commission adopted. 



RESOLVE that to commemorate 
tion and to commemorate the 
that work begin as soon as 
Hall grounds to assure that 
scheduled for the summer of 
that purpose under Article 
for this work whether reimb 
chusetts Bicentennial Commi 



the 325th Anniversary of the Town's incorpora- 
Bicentennial Celebration of the United States 

possible on the beautif ication of the Town 
the work will be completed prior to events 
1976, and that the funds appropriated for 

29 of the 1975 Annual Town Meeting be used 

ursement is available or not from the Massa- 

ssion, or any other source. 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or bor- 
row and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the use of the 
Board of Assessors for the purpose of revaluing all real and personal property 
within the Town of Medfield, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 
(Board of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 10. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Assessors 
to employ one of its own members as Assessor/Appraiser and to vote to fix the 
salary of such appointee, or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board 
of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 11. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classification of 
Positions and Pay Schedules of the Personnel Administration Plan to include 
the following: 

REGULAR PART TIME POSITIONS 

ASSESSING DEPARTMENT: Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 
Assessor/Appraiser $5,000 $12,000 

General Secretary 2.87 3.03 3.20 3.36 3.53 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 12. Voted to dismiss this article. 



255 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend the classification of Posi- 
tions and Pay Schedules of the Personnel Administration Plan to include the 

fol lowing: 

FULL TIME POSITIONS 

5ING DEPARTMENT Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 
Assessor/Appraiser $12,000 $13,000 $14,000 $15,000 $16,000 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 13. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from avail- 
able funds for the purposes of making repairs to the Causeway Street bridge, 
or take any action relative thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 14. Voted that the sum of $2,000 be transferred from free cash for 
the purpose of making repairs to the Causeway Street bridge. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from avail- 
able funds to the Town Hall A109-00-200 Operations Account for the purpose of 
making heating and insulation improvements to the Town Hall, or take any action 
relating thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 15. Voted that the sum of $10,795 be transferred from free cash to 
the Town Hall A109-00-200 Operations Account for the purpose of 
making heating and insulation improvements to the Town Hall. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds or 
borrow a sum of money for the construction of street sewers in: 

Longmeadow Road 
Spring Valley Road 
Woodfall Road 
Stonybrook Road 
Evergreen Way 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Water and Sewerage Board) 

ARTICLE 16. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise by borrowing or transfer 
from available funds a sum of money to be used along with a sum of money from 
Robert Brooks for the purposes of constructing a 15" street sewer in Harding 
Street for a distance of approximately 350 feet in a southeasterly direction 
from a manhole at the intersection of Harding and West Mill Streets, or take 
any action relating thereto. (Board of Health and Water and Sewerage Board) 

ARTICLE 17. Voted that the sum of $9,700 be transferred from free cash 

to be used along with a sum of money from Robert Brooks for the 
purpose of constructing a 15" street sewer in Harding Street 
for a distance of 415 feet. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaws as 
follows : 

Add Section 9.5.1 "Any reconstruction of a nonconforming structure 

shall require a variance." 

256 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 18. Voted to amend the Zoning Bylaws by adding the following 
section: 

Section 9.5.1 "Any reconstruction of a nonconforming structure 
shall require a variance except then the reconstruction is in 
the same configuration as the p e-existing structure." 

Yes 302 
No 49 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from 
available funds to be used for preparing preliminary plans for a Police Sta- 
tion, or take any other action relating thereto. (Police Station Study Cte.) 

ARTICLE 19. Voted that the sum of $3,000 be transferred from free cash to 
be used for preparing preliminary plans for a police station. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from 
available funds to the Town Counsel A101-00-200 Operations Account for the 
purposes of providing legal services to the Selectmen's Tenant Selection 
Committee, or take any other action relating thereto. (Board of Selectmen 
and Housing Authority) 

ARTICLE 20. Voted that the sum of $2,000 be transferred from free cash to 
the Town Counsel A101-00-200 Operations Account for the pur- 
poses of providing legal services to the Selectmen's Tenant 
Selection Committee. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from 
available funds to be used for the construction of public sidewalks, or 
take any other action relating thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 21. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 22. To see what sum the Town will vote to transfer from Free Cash to 
defray the expenses of operating the public schools for the purposes of trans- 
portation or do or act anything in relation thereto. (School Committee) 

ARTICLE 22. Voted that the sum of $23,360 be transferred from Free Cash to 

the School Committee Account to defray the expenses of operating 
the public schools for purposes of transportation. 

THE MEETING WAS ADJOURNED AT 11:15 P.M. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven 
days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings 
thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this 21st dat of October A.D. Nineteen hundred and 

seventy-five. 

Houuiy A. KzIldheA 

R. EdiAWid B&aAd 

hvthuJi L. Vojowji 

Selectmen of Medfield 

257 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. October 27, 1975 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections to meet at the time and for 
the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said warrant in not less than 
five (5) public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven (7) days before 
the time of holding the meeting. 

WWCLam H. Mann 
Constable 

Nancy J. Vn<u>£on 
Town Clerk 

A true copy attest: 



258 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 

TOWNOFMEDFIELD 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1975 



259 



ASSESSORS 



In 1975 the Commonwealth made its required five-year determination of 
State-owned lands in Medfield at a figure of $1,700,000. Upon receipt of 
notice of determination, using the expertise of the members of the Board, we 
prepared an Appeal from this determination, did an appraisal of the lands, and 
with the assistance of the Town Counsel tried the action before the Appellate 
Tax Board. Upon all of the evidence, that Board found the value of said lands 
to be $2,200,000, an increase in value of $500,000. At present the in lieu of 
tax payment is $134,000. This increase in value should result in an addition- 
al $38,200 for the coming year, and an additional $191,000 in State aid over 
the next five-year period. 

The policy of the Board of Assessors in the past has been to revalue 
every ten years. This keeps the values in their proper balance. The first 
revaluation was in 1957, the second in 1968. Twice within the past year we 
have placed proposals before you at Town Meeting for a professional revaluation 
of all taxable property within the Town in order that we, as a Board, might 
comply with the requirements of the law and that you, as taxpayers, might all 
be paying your fair share of the tax burden. You have rejected our proposals 
twice and we, therefore, are unable to comply with the law. From your stand- 
point as taxpayers you will fall into one of three groups. One of these will 
continue to pay his fair share of the tax burden, the other will continue to 
pay more than his fair share of the tax burden, while the third group will 
continue to pay less than his fair share of the tax burden. 

Our requests for additional funds with which to employ additional full- 
time help has been unavailing. This year we were assigned a 14-year old CETA 
person, plus clerical help for 12 hours a week. We have one full-time secre- 
tary — we need two in order to function properly. 



Our customary report follows: 
Town Appropriations 



$6,556,438.00 



From Free Cash 

From Other Available Funds 

Court Judgments 

Overlay Deficits 



42,999.24 
139,333.00 



$6,738,770.24 

5,052.46 

681.82 



Public Libraries 
School Lunch Program 
Elderly Lunch Program 



3,682.88 

16,135.20 

86.40 



19,904.48 



State Assessments 



Special Education Ch. 766 

Underestimate 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 

Audit of Municipal Accounts 

State Recreation Areas 



20,001.00 

6,822.00 

953.55 

81.50 

42,771.67 



260 



Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 

Mosquito Control Projects 

Air Pollution Control Districts 

Metropolitan Area Planning District 

Underestimate 

County Assessments: 

County Tax 
County Hospital 

Overlay 

GROSS AMOUNT TO BE RAISED: 

Estimated Receipts from General Fund Reimbursements 
and Distributions, Agency, Highway, and Local Aid 



73,938.00 
10,012.12 

863.14 
1,264.20 

488.82 



174,556.90 
12,447.49 



157,196.00 

187,004.39 

53,494.71 

$7,162,104.10 



Funds Distributions 



1,698,633.56 



Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 

Licenses 

Fines 

Special Assessments 

General Government 

Health and Sanitation 

School 

Farm Animal 

Interest 

Water Department 

Tax Titles 



267,913.03 

17,916.21 

1,422.00 

10,981.60 

9,636.08 

3,251.00 

1,121.25 

8.98 

121,217,87 

118,256.33 

2,833.98 



Overestimates 



1,239.74 



Amounts voted from Available Funds 
Available funds to reduce tax rate 

NET AMOUNT TO BE RAISED 

Real Property Valuations 
Personal Property Valuations 
Total Property Valuation 

Tax Rate: 

Real Property Tax 

Personal Property Tax 

Total Taxes Levied on Property 

Water Betterment 
Water Liens 



182,332.24 
355,000.00 



69,280,485.00 

1,781,850.00 

$71,062,335.00 

$61.50 



$2,791,763.87 
$4,370,340.23 



$4,260,756.46 



$4,370,340.23 



2,360.15 
8,180.84 

Respectfully submitted, 

WdL\jJUUL<L J. WUUU 

RogzA E. Handy 

Jo4e.ph S. Kmnzdy 

Board of Assessors of Medfield 



261 



REPORT OF COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



LEVY OF 

1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 



1966 
1967 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 



1967 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1975 



1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 



1974 


1975 




1975 


BALANCE 


COLLECTED 




BALANCE 


9.50 


9.50 




.00 


64.80 


10.75 




54.05 


101.89 


13.06 




88.83 


947.99 


538.52 




409.47 


389.27 


60.09 




329.18 


253.75 


171.25 




82.50 





93,667.30 




412.56 




REAL ESTATE TAXES 




18.40 


10.40 




8.00 


67.87 


11.32 




56.55 


259.19 


9.62 




249.57 


919.72 


9.88 




909.84 


1,406.69 


24.09 


1 


,382.60 


4,604.03 


3,857.97 




746.06 


7,920.41 


5,354.72 


2 


,565.69 


23,860.57 


18,450.77 


5 


,409.80 


52,312.36 


48,191.53 


4 


,120.83 





3,701,942.31 


22 


,887.06 




WATER LIENS ADDED TO 


TAXES 




65.76 


.00 




65.76 


99.35 


35.76 




63.59 


(247.56) 


46.08 




(293.64) 


77.49 


70.02 




7.47 


28.07 


170.60 




(142.53) 


298.16 


583.65 




(285.49) 





7,606.90 




171.12 




MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 


TAXES 




10.45 


10.45 




.00 


5.08 


5.08 




.00 


671.03 


233.55 




437.48 


635.88 


561.00 




74.88 


1,071.78 


910.61 




161.17 


4,823.92 


4,098.29 




725.63 


102,288.22 


99,390.09 


2 


,898.13 





336,805.63 


43 


,428.01 



TOTAL 
BALANCE 



1,376.59 



38,336.00 



(413.72) 



47,725.30 



The above report is for the calendar year ending December 31, 1975 

Respectfully submitted, 

ChaAlzA H. RayneA, J*. 

Collector of Taxes 



262 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



For the Period: July 1, 1974 - June 30, 1975 
RECEIPTS 



Balance Cash on Hand July 1, 1974 



$ 245,440.30 



Taxes: 

1974-1975 $3,770,183.96 

Previous years 18,834.41 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 454,407.57 

Water and Sewer Betterments 11,385.31 

Tax Interest & Certification of Liens 7,884.29 

State Tax - Local Aid 4,145.25 

Farm Animal Excise Tax 8.98 



4,266,849.77 



Licenses and Permits: 
Gas Permits 
Wiring Permits 
Building Permits 
Plumbing Permits 
Other Licenses and Refunds 
Street Listings and Executive 

Department Licenses 
Tennis Courts 
Health Permits 

Grants from State - County & Federal Govt* 
Dept. Natural Resources 
Schools - Building Program 
Schools - Other 
Highways - State & County Aid 
State Lottery Aid 
Veterans' Services 
Sewer Extensions - Federal Aid 
Library - Dog Tax, etc. 
Tri-County School District 
Police Dept. - Radar 

Departmental Revenue: 

Bicentennial Committee 

Planning Board 

Sealer 

Water - Refunds 

Town Hall - Refunds 

School - Sales of Materials, etc. 

Police - Special Duty Details 

Highway - Refunds 

Fire Insurance - School 

Police Cruiser - Refund 

Zoning & Appeals Board 



340.00 
2,210.00 
8,367.15 
2,014.00 

2,931.81 

7,782.39 
1,759.20 



128,651.27 

149,196.04 

1,333,167.05 

96,510.66 

77,660.04 

2,626.35 

1,104,517.45 

5,849.53 

6,372.79 



3,672.00 

7,847.77 

115.30 

2,489.73 

36.15 

5,574.03 

14,784.38 

3,982.51 

2,189.49 

487.00 

788.50 



28,167.45 



2,905.746.18 



263 



Ambulance Fees 

Library Fines and Refunds 

Court Fines 

Cancelled Checks 

W/C Insurance Refund 

Accrued Interest on Investments 

Dog Officer 



4,709.45 
2,103.42 
1,305.00 
1,391.24 

397.80 
105,399.17 

122.25 



$ 157,393.19 



Water Department: 
Sale of Water 
Water Services 



122,786.11 

3,577.87 126,363.98 



Cemetery : 

Sale of Lots and Graves 



etc. 



2,481.00 



Interest on Trust Funds: 
Library 

Granville F. Dailey - Library 
Cemetery Perpetual Care 
Clara S. Littledale - Library 
Conservation Funds 
Revenue Sharing 



1,006.48 
3,823.14 
5,196.92 

115.70 
10.00 

969.91 



11,122.15 



Loans: 
Highway 
Schools 



30,000.00 
43,625.00 



73,625.00 



Reserve Funds: 

School - Special Needs 

School - Adult Education 

School - Athletic Association 

School - Cafeteria 

School - Titles I - V 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 

Dog Taxes 

Group Insurance 

County Retirement 

Teachers' Insurance & Credit Union 

Federal Withholding Taxes 

State Withholding Taxes 

Teachers' Retirement 

Stabilization Fund 

Road Machinery Funds 



16,225.80 

6,608.00 

6,071.91 

171,806.49 

21,223.09 

4,500.00 

3,624.90 

69,053.61 

36,886.51 

84,464.92 

555,275.15 

153,043.96 

128,449.46 

100,000.00 

498.50 



1,357,732.30 



Federal - Revenue Sharing Fund 
State - Treasury Department 



132,428.00 
103,647.60 



Available Funds - Invested 



Total Receipts and Cash on Hand 



$20,875,887.67 



264 



EXPENDITURES 7/1/74 - 6/30/75 



General Government: 
Selectmen 
Executive 
Treasurer 
Town Accountant 
Collector 
Assessors 
Clerk 

Election & Registrations 
Town Hall & Parking Yard 
Counsel 

Warrant Committee 
Planning 
Personnel 
Data Processing 
Town Garage Construction 

Protection of Persons & Property: 
Gas Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector 
Wiring Inspector 
Building Inspector 
Police 
Fire 

Ambulance Purchase 
Sealer 

Care of Trees 
Mosquito Spray 
Dutch Elm Disease 
Ambulance - Operation 
Police Cruisers 
Dog Officer 
Civil Defense 
School Traffic - Police 
Police Transmitters - Control 
Police - Special Duty Detail 



6,832.00 

84,030.51 

6,187.41 

3,650.00 

6,978.60 

14,043.26 

4,497.71 

9,629.76 

27,805.23 

10,916.84 

518.53 

7,635.26 

324.60 

10,764.64 

400.70 



707.00 

1,563.50 

2,513.00 

9,248.03 

204,546.01 

51,384.14 

17,503.56 

195.60 

8,875.00 

3,320.00 

4,727.73 

6,440.69 

21,329.02 

11,985.86 

1,180.39 

11,263.90 

9,846.62 

14,523.12 



$ 194,215.05 



381,153.17 



Health & Sanitation: 

Nurse - Public Health 

Health 

Sewer Maintenance 

Sanitary Landfill 

Garbage Removal 

Sewers - Construction 

Highways : 
Highways 

Traffic Guide Lines 
Snow & Sanding 
Garage - Maintenance 
Chapter 90 - Highways 
Street Lighting 
Dump Truck & Chassis 
Sidewalks 



Route 27 



2,575.00 

6,510.95 

37,970.87 

31,279.90 

18,000.00 

1,432,291.09 



182,293.81 

5,598.67 

47,724.03 

8,699.69 

87,536.65 

23,187.24 

38,028.20 

1,656.81 



1,528,627.81 



394,725.10 



265 



Veterans' Benefits: 

Veterans' Services and Aid 

School and Library: 
Schools 

Regional Vocational H.S. 
Athletic Association 
Cafeterias 
Library 

Norwood Mental Health Center 
Junior-Senior High School 
Adult Education 
School Roofing 

Public Law 89-210 - Voc. Educ. 
Planning Committee 



$ 12,151.38 



$ 3,723,166.88 

22,421.21 

6,598.52 

183,483.24 

36,940.92 

5,800.00 

6,212.01 

8,808.64 

73,080.85 

44,170.31 

100.00 4,110,782.58 



Water and Cemetery: 
Water - Maintenance 
Water - Wells Construction 
Cemetery 



84,814.71 
58,902.06 
15,636.83 



159.353.60 



Miscellaneous : 

Planning Board - Forfeitures 

Tax Interest - Refunds 

Historical & Bicentennial Comm, 

Memorial Day 

Appeals Board 

Real Estate Tax - Refunds 

Parks 

Town Meetings 

Town Report 

Motor Excise Tax - Refunds 

County Retirement System 

Camp - Handicapped Children 

Water Assessments - Refunds 

Aging Council 

Conservation & Land Purchase 

Tennis Courts 

Master Plan 

Swimming Pond 

Recreation - Youth Program 

Skating Pond 

Industrial Comm. 

Land Use Comm. 



7,616.11 

71.92 

4,693.42 

502.40 

998.44 

14,816.14 

16,353.82 

2,312.90 

5,780.05 

9,153.10 

51,638.27 

2,095.40 

212.63 

1,567.70 

36,931.25 

43,978.49 

2,500.00 

12,408.67 

13,868.32 

321.60 

232.01 

950.00 



229,002.64 



State and County Taxes: 
Parks & Reservations 
County Tax 
State Audit 

Mosquito Control - County 
County Hospital 
Motor Excise Tax Bills 
Metropolitan Planning 
Mass. Bay Transit Authority 
State Air Pollution 



40,158.32 

129,681.98 

440.80 

7,821.45 

8,999.19 

1,253.40 

910.22 

57,483.74 

493.71 



247,242.81 



266 



Town Debt: 

Maturing Debt. 
Interest on Debt 
Highway Loans 

Insurance: 

Vehicle Liability 

Workmen's Compensation 

Group Accident & Life 

Property 

Indemnity Insurance 



$ 464,000.00 
226,419.44 
30,000.00 $ 



1,063.42 
20,725.00 
64,521.75 

3,943.65 



720,419.44 



92,874.82 



Trust or Agency Funds: 
State - Treasury Dept. 
Library 

Dog Taxes - County 
Federal Withholding Taxes 
Group Accident & Life Insurance 
Stabilization Funds 
Cemetery Funds 
State Withholding Taxes 
County Retirement Funds 
Mass. Teachers' Insurance & 
Retirement Funds 



Available Funds 



Invested 



103,647.60 

196.00 

3,777.75 

555,275.15 

66,102.59 

117,232.86 

4,500.00 

140,278.58 

35,150.78 

202,268.51 1,228,429.82 

11,046,000.00 



Cash on Hand and in Bank: 
June 30, 1975 

Total Expenditures and Cash on Hand 



530,909.45 
$20,875,887.67 



267 



OUTSTANDING DEBT ACCOUNTS 
June 30, 1975 



Net Funded or Fixed Debt 



Loans : 

Outside Debt Limit: 

Junior-Senior High School 
Memorial School Additon 
Dale Street School Addition 
Elementary (Intermediate) School 
Elm Street (Wheelock) School 
Sewer Project 
Sewer Project 

Inside Debt Limit: 
Fire Station 
Smith Pumping Station 
School Operating Budget 



$4,468,625.00 



I 375,000.00 

20,000.00 

200,000.00 

890,000.00 

1,190,000.00 

60,000.00 

1,655,000.00 



5,000.00 
30,000.00 



Total Loans $4,468,625.00 



DEBT BY YEAR OF MATURITY 



(Principal Only) 



Fiscal 


1976 


$493,625. 


,00 


Fiscal 


1977 


395,000, 


,00 


Fiscal 


1978 


365,000, 


,00 


Fiscal 


1979 


365,000, 


,00 


Fiscal 


1980 


365,000, 


.00 


Fiscal 


1981 


290,000, 


.00 


Fiscal 


1982 


290,000, 


.00 


Fiscal 


1983 


290,000, 


.00 


Fiscal 


1984 


255,000, 


.00 


Fiscal 


1985 


255,000, 


.00 



Fiscal 


1986 


$170,000.00 


Fiscal 


1987 


170,000.00 


Fiscal 


1988 


170,000.00 


Fiscal 


1989 


170,000.00 


Fiscal 


1990 


85,000.00 


Fiscal 


1991 


85,000.00 


Fiscal 


1992 


85,000.00 


Fiscal 


1993 


85,000.00 


Fiscal 


1994 


85,000.00 



268 



Balance Sheet - June 30, 1975 



Cash in Banks and Office 
Invested Funds 



530,909.45 
970,000.00 



Accounts Receivable: 



Tax Levy 
1966 
1967 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 
1973-4 
1974-5 



8.00 

56.55 

249.57 

919.34 

1,436.65 

3,363.29 

3,884.24 

10,480.05 

66,233.44 



631.13 



Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes: 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 

Special Assessments: 



10.45 

5.08 

671.03 

616.08 

294.07 

2,167.21 

11,099.92 



69,906.51 



Water: 


Betterments 


Levy: 


1967 




1970 




1972 




1974 


Committed Interest 



Special Taxes in Litigation 

Tax Titles and Possessions: 
Tax Titles 
Tax Possessions 

Departmental Accounts Receivable 
Ambulance 

Cemetery Annual Care 
Cemetery Sale of Lots 
Police Off-Duty Details 



54.24 

8,775.02 

25.11 

77.38 

348.20 



9,279.95 





3,353.01 


9,507.77 




525.25 


10,033.02 


8,307.35 




5,041.00 




240.00 




1,525.26 


15,113.61 



Water: Liens Added to Taxes 
Levy: 1967 

1969 

1971 

1974 

1975 
Rates 



65.76 

63.59 

7.47 

308.99 

7,709.46 

17,881.62 



269 



Services 

Sales & Use Tax 

Aid to Highways: 
State 

County 

Unprovided for: 
Overlay 1969 
1971 
Land Takings 
State Mosquito Control 



TOTAL ASSETS 
LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 



4,984.95 
683.48 



5,624.74 
1,422.94 



440.42 
241.40 
518.53 
783.47 



$ 31,705.32 



7,047.68 



1,983.82 



$ 1,735,963.50 



State & County Assessments: 
M.B.T.A. 

Parks and Reservations 
Metropolitan Planning District 
County Tax 
Mosquito Control 

Payroll Deductions: 
State Withheld Taxes 
Retirement Plan - County 
Group Insurance 
Teachers Retirement and Insurance 

Guarantee Deposits: 
Planning Board 



1,284.19 
8,682.64 
435.96 
4,054.03 
1,127.81 



12,765.38 
4,636.03 
8,105.51 

12,886 .31 



15,584.63 

38,393.23 
13,421.70 



Agency: 

Water Sales Taxes 
Dog Taxes - County 

Tailings: Unclaimed Checks 



683.48 
518.55 



1,202.03 
4,155.91 



Trust Fund Income: 
Conservation 
Library 
Cemetery 

Federal Grants: 

Occupational Education P/L 89.576 
Titles I, II, III, & V 
Revenue Sharing Funds 
Revenue Sharing Income 

Revolving Funds: 
School Cafeteria 
School Athletic Association 

Appropriation Balances: 
Sewer Extensions 
Schools 



277.58 
3,383.04 

9,351.06 



9,601.55 

10,764.00 

121,542.00 

13,364.95 



472.14 
391.71 



4,996.73 
129,668.87 



13,011.68 



155,272.50 



863.85 



270 



Conservation 
Water Extensions 
All Other 

Highway Road Machinery Fund 

Sale of Real Estate 

Reserve Fund Overlay Surplus 

Overlays Reserved for Abatements 
Levy: 1968 
1970 
1972 
1973 
1974 

Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 
Farm Animal Excise 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Special Assessment 
Special Taxes in Litigation 
Tax Title and Possession 
Departmental Revenue 
Water 

Aid to Highways 
Water Liens 

Surplus Revenue 



$ 15,620.23 
196,689.58 



6,586.00 

4,724.82 

475.73 

24,383.07 

4,793.36 



4.49 

69,906.51 

9,279.95 

3,353.01 

10,033.02 

15,113.61 

22,866.57 

7,047.68 

335.10 



498.50 
3,000.00 
1,535.89 



40,962.98 



137,939.94 
916,493.44 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 



$ 1,735,963.50 



271 



TRUST ACCOUNTS 

PRINCIPAL 

Trust and Investment Funds 

Cash and Securities, June 30, 1975 $370,673.60 

Funds in Custody of Town Treasurer: 

Library - Granville F. Dailey Trust $ 88,896.99 

Clara S. Littledale Trust 2,653.50 

Library Trust Funds 9,000.00 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 88,180.00 

Stabilization 173,542.33 

Conservation 2 , 370. 66 

$364,643.48 

Funds in Custody of Selectmen 

Moses Ellis Post #117 G.A.R. 6,030.12 



The foregoing report is an account of the financial transactions and 
standing of the Town of Medfield for the twelve month fiscal period ending 
June 30, 1975. 

llJ^Ua J. Houtlvtt 
TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



272 



CONTRACTS FOR PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



Department or Board 
Selectmen 

Water & Sewer 



Planning 



School 



Police Station 
Study Committee 



*Per student per year 



Purpose 

Sanitary Landfill 

Engineering 

Services 

Engineering 
Services - Rocky 
Lane Water Mains 

Design & Super- 
vision Well #4 



Design Services 
Longmeadow 
Street Sewers 

Application Pre- 
paration, Environ- 
mental Impact 
Statement Charles 
River Interceptor, 
etc. and Betterment 
Assessment Data 
and Drawings 

Assistance in the 
preparation and 
presentation of the 
Sign Bylaw 



Consultant 

C.E. Maguire, Inc 
60 First Avenue 
Waltham, Mass. 

Walter Amory 
15 Depot Street 
Duxbury, Mass. 

Walter Amory 
15 Depot Street 
Duxbury, Mass. 

Weston & Sampson 
10 High Street 
Boston, Mass. 

Weston & Sampson 
10 High Street 
Boston, Mass. 



Designs and 

Devices, Inc. 
8 Grant Street 
Cambridge, Mass. 



Review of business Masbo Coop. Corp 
functions and pro- 53 Salisbury St. 
cedures presently Winchester, Mass, 
used by the Medfield 
School Department 



Amount 



$5,600, 



Not to Exceed 
$6,000. 



$32,100. 



$46,000, 



Not to Exceed 
$10,000. 



$3,900. 



$ 450. 



Computer Services 
Scheduling, Grade 
Reporting, and 
Attendance 

Preliminary 
Design for 
Police Facilities 



Educators Consul- Sched. $1.15* 

tant Service, Inc. Grade 1.95* 

Hudson, Mass. Atten. 0.90* 



Rich, Lang & Cote $1,600, 
Newton Falls, Mass. 



The above information is printed in accordance with Article II, Section 21 of 
the Town of Medfield By-laws. These contracts are available for review in the 
Selectmen's office. 



273 



REPORT OF TOWN TREASURER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Citizens of Medfield: 

STATEMENT OF CASH 

Cash in Banks December 31, 1975 $ 718,527.29 

Receipts 1975 - including investments 17,495,490.62 

Disbursements 1975 - including investments 16 ,586 ,899. 90 

Cash in Banks December 31, 1975 - Checking $ 1,240,610.78 

Savings $ 386,507.23 

STATEMENT OF INVESTMENTS 

General Fund $ 300,000.00 
Stabilization Fund 178,216.75 

Federal Revenue Sharing Funds - Savings 135,774. 81 

Investments December 31, 1975 $ 613,991.56 

Total Cash, Savings and Investments December 31, 1975 $ 2,241,109.57 



INTEREST EARNED ON INVESTMENTS 

General Fund $ 48,325.74 

Stabilization Fund 18,764.10 

Sewer Project Funds 11,037.54 

Federal Revenue Sharing Funds 3,847. 73 

Interest Earned 1975 $ 8 \'VJ>'\1 

Interest Earned but not Received 1975 3,382.54 

Total Interest Earned 1975 $ 85,357.65 



FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING FUNDS 

Cash in Bank December 31, 1974 $ 1,606.08 
Distribution received 1975 134,713.00 
Interest Earned on Investments 1975 3,847. 73 

Total Revenue Sharing Funds 1975 $ 140,166.81 

Transferred to Article 8 

Voted Annual Town Meeting 1974 $ (2,000.00) (2,000.00 ) 

Cash in Bank and Investment December 31, 1975 $ 138,166.81 



274 



Although the cash position of the Town of Medfield for the year 1975 
remained relatively high when compared with the past several years, interest 
rates on investments were down to less than half of the historic rates of 
1974. This fact is reflected in the amount of interest earned in 1975 as 
compared with 1974. 

Again, I am pleased to report that we have not borrowed in anticipation 
of revenue since July 11, 1973. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EduoaAd F. BaAAeJX, J \. 
Town Treasurer 



275 



PERPETUAL CARE 



Adelbert Kilmer Lot 
Lawrence Alger Lot 
Charles Alger Lot 
John Alger Lot 
Greta Mann Lot 
Robert Alger Lot 
Olga Harrington Lot 
Barbara Alger Lot 
Joseph Zanstuck Lot 
Alexander Johnson Lot 
Forrest Parker Lot 
Walter Sabbag Lot 
Charles Austin Lot 
Garfield Farrell Lot 
Joseph Lanseigne Lot 
Irma Pickard Lot 
Bruce Rieth Lot 
Robert J. Davidson Lot 
Rae J. Conway Lot 
Walter Marks Lot 
William Doub Lot 
TOTAL 



$100.00 
200.00 
200.00 
100.00 
100.00 
200.00 
200.00 
100.00 
200.00 
100.00 
100.00 
400.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
100.00 
200.00 
300.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
$3800.00 



276 



TOWNOFMEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, 
greetings : 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in town 
affairs to meet at the Memorial School, in said Medfield, on Monday, the 
twenty-ninth day of March A.D., 1976, at 6:00 o'clock a.m., then and there to 
act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected 
annually by ballot, viz: 

One Moderator and one member of the School Committee for one year. 

One Selectman, one Assessor, one member of the School Committee, 
two Trustees of the Public Library, one Town Clerk, two Park Com- 
missioners, all for three years 

One member of the Housing Authority for four years. 

One member of the Planning Board and one member of the Housing 
Authority, both for five years. 

The polls will be opened at 6:00 o'clock a.m. and shall be closed at 
8:00 o'clock p.m. 

On Monday, the twenty-sixth day of April A.D. 1976 commencing at 7:30 p.m., 
the following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark Kingsbury School 
gymnasium in said Medfield, viz: 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the 
several Town Officers for the past year. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or transfer 
from available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any 
other Town Officer, Board, Commission and Committee to defray operating 
expenses of the Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1976, or 
such other sums as the Town may determine as required by General Laws, 
Chapter 41, Section 108, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer 
with t^he approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1976, 
in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to 



277 



renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
iance with General Laws, Chapter AA , Section 17. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector to use all means 
in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to that office. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensation 
of the following elected officers: 

Moderator 

Town Clerk 

Treasurer 

Selectmen 

Assessors 

School Committee 

Trustees of Public Library 

Collector of Taxes 

Park and Recreation Commission 

Planning Board 

Housing Authority 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administra- 
tion Plan, effective July 1, 1976, to read as follows: 

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
Adopted by the Town, November 30, 196A 
(As amended through June 30, 19 76) 

I. TITLE 

The Classification of Positions and the Pay Schedule appended hereto, and 
the provisions of the By-law shall be entitled Personnel Administration Plan 
(hereinafter referred to as The Plan), for the Town of Medfield. 

II. APPLICATION 

The Plan shall apply to all officers and employees in the service of the 
Town (whether full-time, or part-time, seasonal, casual, special, Civil Ser- 
vice or other) other than those positions filled by popular election and 
those under the direction and control of the School Committee. Nothing here- 
in, however, shall bar using The Plan or its provisions or facilities or com- 
mittees in determining the compensation of such otherwise exempted employees 
or officials. 

III. TITLE OF POSITIONS 

No person shall be employed or paid as an employee in any position sub- 
ject to the provisions of The Plan under any title other than those in the 
Schedules or under any title other than that of the job, the duties of which 
are actually performed. The job title in The Plan shall be the official 
title of the position and shall be used in all administrative and employment 
records, and in every other connection involving personnel or fiscal 
processes . 



278 



IV. PERSONNEL BOARD 

Under The Plan, there shall be a Personnel Board consisting of three mem- 
bers who shall be appointed by the Moderator acting in conjunction with the 
Chairman of the Board of Selectmen and the Chairman of the Warrant Committee. 
The term of office of members of the Personnel Board shall be three y«ars ; 
initial appointments to the Personnel Board were for the periods of one year, 
two years and three years respectively. No elected or appointed officer of 
the Town of Medfield and no person employed by the Town of Medfield shall be 
eligible for service upon the Personnel Board. 

The Personnel Board shall serve without pay. 



V. DUTIES OF THE PERSONNEL BOARD 

A. The Personnel Board shall administer The Plan and establish such poli- 
cies, procedures and regulations consistent with The Plan as it deems 
necessary. 

B. The Personnel Board shall maintain written descriptions of the job 
titles in The Plan describing the essential characteristics, requirements and 
the general duties. The descriptions shall not be interpreted as complete or 
limiting definitions and employees shall continue to perform any duties 
assigned by their superiors. 

C. The Town Accountant and Department Heads shall keep such records of 
the employees of the Town as the Personnel Board may require. The Personnel 
Board shall keep such records of its own as it considers appropriate. All 
records of the Town which pertain to the Town's employees, by whomever kept, 
shall be open to inspection by the Personnel Board or any of its members at 
all reasonable times. 

D. The Personnel Board, from time to time, shall review the work of all 
positions subject to The Plan. Such reviews shall be so scheduled as to 
cover all such positions at intervals of not more than three years. In case 
of urgent necessity, the Personnel Board may tentatively add a new position 
to The Plan or reclassify an existing position, subject to the subsequent 
ratification of its action by a formal amendment of The Plan at the next town 
meeting. No such action may be taken in connection with positions subject to 
Civil Service Laws . 

E. The Personnel Board shall from time to time review the Pay Schedules. 
It shall keep informed as to pay rates and policies outside the services of 
the Town and shall recommend to the Town any action deemed desirable to main- 
tain a fair and equitable pay level. 

F. Upon recommendation of a Department Head, supported by evidence in 
writing of special reasons and exceptional circumstances satisfactory to the 
Personnel Board, said Board may authorize an entrance rate higher than the 
minimum rate for a position, and such other variances in The Plan as it may 
deem necessary for the proper functioning of the services of the Town. 



VI. TYPES OF EMPLOYMENT 

All positions subject to the provisions of The Plan shall fall into one 
of the following categories: 

279 



A. Regular Full-Time : Regularly scheduled to work, a full schedule of 40 
hours per week, 52 weeks a year. 

B. Regular Part-Time : Regularly schedule to work no less than 20 hours 
per week, 52 weeks a year. 

C. Casual Part-Time : Occasional employment for an hourly rate or fee. 

D. Temporary : Employed for a specific short period of time not to exceed 
6 months. Temporary employment beyond 6 months must be authorized in 
advance by the Department Head and the Personnel Board. 

These categories will determine an employee's eligibility for fringe 
benefits . 



VII. STEP INCREASES - MERIT 

Progression through the rate ranges normally will be one step annually on 
employee's anniversary date provided this is recommended by the Department 
Head and the Personnel Board. 

A. General Increase : When rate ranges are affected by a wage increase 
voted by the Town, either fixed percentage or fixed amount, all em- 
ployees covered by The Plan, except those specifically excluded or 
those holding personal rates, shall receive the increase and the rate 
ranges will be adjusted accordingly. Those holding personal rates 
shall not receive increases until the maximum for the classification 
exceeds the personal rate. 



VIII. PROMOTION AND TRANSFERS 

When an employee is promoted to a higher rated job, he shall enter at the 
minimum of the job's range or at his own rate, whichever is the higher. He 
may also receive a step increase at the time, if the Department Head feels 
that qualifications and performance warrant it, and the Personnel Board 
authorizes it. 

If an employee should be transferred and reclassified to a lower rated 
job, he shall enter it at his own rate or at the maximum of the job, which- 
ever is lower. 

No rate of pay shall be reduced as a result of the rate range revision in 
The Plan. When an employee receives a pay rate above the maximum for the job, 
this rate becomes a personal rate and applies only to the present incumbent. 
When his employment ends, no successor shall advance beyond the maximum for 
the job. 



IX. N EW PERSONNEL 

The hiring rate shall be the minimum of the rate range for the job unless 
otherwise authorized by the Department Head and Personnel Board. If such 
authorization is given, it shall be supported by the Department Head's 
written statement of reasons. 



280 



X. PHYSICAL EXAMINATION 

A pre-employment physical examination will. be required of all regular 
full-time and regular part-time new personnel by a qualified physician of 
the employee's choice. The report is to be made on a form to be provided by 
the Town of Medfield and examination will be at the expense of the Town. 



XI. VACATIONS 

The following annual vacations with pay will be granted to all regular 
full-time employees and to regular part-time employees who are on an hourly 
paid basis, after the following periods of continuous employment. 

Time Employed Length of Vacations 

As of June 1st Each Year 

6 months up to one year 5 days 

1 year, but less than five years 10 days 

5 years, but less than ten years 15 days 

10 years and over 20 days 

The weekly vacation pay of regular part-time employees shall be the 
average of weekly pay for the last twenty-six (26) weeks worked immediately 
preceding the vacation. 

Vacations with pay shall not be granted to temporary or casual part-time 
employees. 

Should a holiday fall during an employee's regularly scheduled work day 
while the employee is on an authorized vacation, an additional day of vacation 
will be allowed. 

Vacations shall not be cumulative from year to year. 

Employees terminating their employment with the Town will receive payment 
in lieu of any earned vacation not yet taken in the calendar year of their 
employment termination. 

XII. HOLIDAYS 

Regular full-time employees and regular part-time employees shall be 
paid for each of the following holidays, except that regular part-time 
employees shall be paid only for those holidays falling on a regularly 
scheduled work day and on the same basis as their earnings, if they had 
worked: 

New Year's Day Memorial Day Veterans' Day 

Martin Luther King Day Independence Day Thanksgiving Day 

Washington's Birthday Labor Day Christmas Day 

Patriot's Day Columbus Day 

Regular full-time employees of the various Town Departments, other than 
Department Heads, required to work on any of the above specified holidays 
shall be paid on the basis of straight time in addition to the regular holiday 
pay for that day, or, at the discretion of the Department Head, may be given 
equivalent time off at regular pay. 



281 



Police Department employees will be paid at straight time for time worked 
on a holiday in addition to holiday pay. Police Department employees working 
on a scheduled day off which is a holiday may be given equivalent time off at 
straight time. 

Holidays with pay shall not be granted to temporary or casual part-time 
employees . 

XIII. LEAVES OF ABSENCE 

Except for reasons to the extent hereinafter provided, all leaves of 
absence shall be without compensation. 

A. Sick Leave : 

1. Upon completion of 30 days' regular full-time employment, an 
employee shall be allowed one and one quarter days' sick leave with pay 
for each month of employment completed in any given calendar year provided 
such leave is caused by sickness or injury or by exposure to contagious 
disease, but not injury sustained in other employment. 

2. An employee in continuous employment shall be credited with the 
unused portion of sick leave granted under subsection (1) up to a maximum 
of ninety (90) days. 

3. If the amount of sick leave credit provided for under subsection 
(2) has been, or is about to be exhausted, an employee may make application 
for additional allowance to that provided under subsection (1) . Such appli- 
cation shall be made to the Personnel Board which is authorized to grant 
such additional allowance as it may determine to be equitable after review- 
ing all circumstances including the employee's attendance and performance 
record prior to conditions supporting his request for additional allowance. 

4. Sick leave must be authorized by the Department Head and must be 
reported, on blank provided for same, to the Personnel Board. 

5. A physician's certificate of illness may be requested by the 
Department Head after three days' absence or after a series of repeated 
absences during the year. This certificate shall be forwarded by the 
Department Head to the Personnel Board. 

6. The Personnel Board may require a medical examination of any 
employee who reports his inability to report for duty because of illness. 
This examination would be at the expense of the Town by a physician ap- 
pointed by the Personnel Board. 

7. Injury, illness or disability self-imposed, or resulting from the 
use of alcohol or drugs shall not be considered a proper claim for sick 
leave under this Section. 

8. An employee who is incapacitated by reason of an injury sustained 
in the course of and arising out of his employment by the Town may elect 
to receive from his accumulated sick leave the difference between his 

^normal work week compensation and the weekly indemnity of the Workman's 
Compensation Act, beginning with the first day of incapacity. 



282 



9. Notification of absence due to illness must be made as early as 
possible on the first day of absence, either to the employee's immediate 
superior or to the Department Head. 

10. Nothing in this Section shall be construed to conflict with 
Section 100, Chapter 41 of the General Laws, and in the event of such con- 
flict the provisions of said Section 100 of Chapter 41 shall prevail as to 
employees covered by said Section 100 of Chapter 41. 

B. Jury Duty ; 

A regular full-time employee called for jury duty shall be paid by the 

Town an amount equal to the difference between the compensation paid for a 

normal working period and the amount paid by the Court excluding allowance 
for travel. 

C. Military Training : 

Regular full-time employees with more than one year continuous employ- 
ment by the Town next prior to the time of performing the service herein 
referred to, who are required to report for temporary summer or like period 
of training in the military forces of the Nation or the Commonwealth shall 
be paid an amount equal to the difference between compensation for normal 
working period of two weeks and the amount paid for military training. An 
employee, on request, may combine his military leave with his regular vaca- 
tion period. 

D. Funeral Leave : 

Regular full-time employees shall be given up to three days' leave with 
pay for the purpose of making arrangements and attending the funeral of mem- 
bers of their immediate family which is defined as the following: mother, 
father, mother-in-law, father-in-law, sister, brother, spouse, child and 
grandparents of the employee. 



XIV. OVERTIME 

Overtime will be worked only with authorization of the Department Head. 
Regular full-time employees, exclusive of Department Heads, who are required 
by the Department Head to work overtime, will be paid time and one half for all 
hours worked in excess of forty hours (40) per week within the department 
where the employee is regularly employed. Where overtime is performed for a 
department other than the employee's regular full-time department, the overtime 
rate will be time and one half the appropriate rate schedule for the work being 
performed as determined by the Department Head for whom the work is being 
accomplished. 



XV. SPECIAL PAY PROVISIONS 

A. Call Back : 

When an hourly paid employee is called in to work on an emergency 
assignment, pay shall be no less than two (2) hours' pay at the appropriate, 
straight-time, hourly rate. This does not apply to planned overtime. 



283 



B. Snow Removal : 

Time and one half for the time worked other than the normal schedule. 
Double time for time worked on Sundays and Holidays. 

C. Fire Pay : 

1. All firemen responding to a call will receive a guaranteed minimum 
of two (2) hours' fire pay. 

2. Town employees responding as call firemen will receive one (1) 
hour at their Town job rate for the first hour of the fire's duration. 

3. Should the fire continue beyond the one (1) hour, normal fire pay 
will apply for the duration of the fire. 

4. Between the hours of 12:00 midnight and 6:00 a.m. an additional 
premium hour will be guaranteed for all men who respond. This means that 
once a fire goes into the second hour an additional hour of pay will be 
added, i.e. , 2 hours becomes 3, 3 hours becomes 4, etc. 

D. Police Intern : 

Plan Intern will receive 7% improvement per successive year in the 
Intern Program. 

E. Longevity : 

Regular full-time employees shall receive an annual longevity payment 
of $50 after 5 years' continuous regular full-time employment plus $10 for 
each additional year of service up to a total maximum of $200, payable on 
the 2nd pay day of December. 

F. Retirees : 

A full-time employee who enters retirement under the County Retire- 
ment System may be rehired by the Town in the last occupation subject to 
the restriction of the County Retirement Program. Such employment must 
be approved in advance by the Department Head, Board of Selectmen and Per- 
sonnel Board. Such employment and wage rate, which will be considered a 
personal rate, will be subject to approval of the Department Head, Board 
of Selectmen and Personnel Board. Such wage rate will not be adjusted by 
general increase as such. 

XVI. INVALIDITY 

If any provision of this By-law shall conflict with any Civil Service 
law or regulation applicable to any position, or any other law, it shall be 
deemed modified by the law or regulation sufficiently only to end the con- 
flict. The invalidity of any provision hereof shall not be construed to 
invalidate any other provision hereof. 



XVII. CONFLICTING BY-LAWS 

All By-laws or parts of By-laws in conflict with this By-law are 
hereby repealed. 



284 



XVIII. CLASSIFICATION AND SCHEDULES 

The classification and schedules of pay under The Plan shall be as shown 
in the appended "Classification of Positions and Pay Schedules" as from time to 
time, amended. 



XIX. AMENDMENT 

This By-law may be amended by vote of the Town at any regular or special 
meeting provided that at least thirty (30) days prior to the town meeting at 
which such amendment is to be considered, the Personnel Board shall be apprised 
in writing of the proposed amendment. The Personnel Board shall make a report 
and recommendation to the Town prior to the taking of any action by the Town 
upon the proposed amendment. 

CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULES 
SALARIED POSITIONS 



Police Department 


Minimum 


2nd Step 


3rd Step 


4th Step 


Maximum 


Chief 

Sergeant 

Patrolman 


$14,178 
12,577 
10,235 


13,100 
10,953 


11,794 




$18,866 
13,759 
12,577 


Streets, Water and Sewer 


Department 










Superintendent 


15,312 








20,416 


Fire Department 












Chief 


12,266 








15,771 


Executive Department 













6,566 


6,951 


7,290 


7,652 


8,178 


3,388 


3,575 


3,779 


3,989 


4,206 


3,388 


3,575 


3,779 


3,989 


4,206 






Executive Secretary 14,745 22,684 

Administrative Secretary 8,423 8,889 9,382 9,901 10,450 

General 

Dog Officer 8,847 9,641 

Library 

Librarian 
Asst. Librarian 
Children's Librarian 

HOURLY POSITIONS 

Listed below is a 12-grade, 5-step hourly structure, in which all hourly graded 
positions are slotted. 

Grade Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 

1 2.33 2.46 2,59 2.71 2.86 

2 2.54 2.67 2.80 2.93 3.07 

3 2.75 2.86 2.98 3.15 3.34 

285 



4 

5 

6 

7 

B 

9 

10 

11 

12 



GRADE 1 

Swimming Instructor (PTT) 
Lifeguard Instructor (PTT) 

$642 minimum per season 
Library Aide (PTT) 
Playground Counselor (PTT) 
Poll Worker (PTT) 
Lifeguard (PTT) 

$535 minimum per season 
Laborer Intern (PTT) 

May be paid minimum wage 
Laborer (PTT) 



2.98 


3.10 


3.21 


3.39 


3.61 


3.04 


3.21 


3.39 


3.56 


3.74 


3.10 


3.34 


3.51 


3.68 


3.98 


3.51 


3.74 


3.98 


4.21 


4.43 


3.91 


4.16 


4.38 


4.61 


4.91 


4.16 


4.38 


4.61 


4.91 


5.19 


4.38 


4.61 


4.84 


5.14 


5.44 


4.49 


4.79 


5.08 


5.37 


5.67 


4.79 


5.08 


5.37 


5.67 


6.01 


HOURLY 


GRADE LISTINGS 






Part Time/Temporary 


- (PTT) 






Regular - 


(R) 


GRADE 7 







Senior Secretary (R) 
Truck Driver (PTT) 
Special Police Officer (PTT) 
Permanent Intermittent (PTT) 
Call Firefighters (PTT) 
Ambulance E.M.T. (PTT) 



GRADE 2 
Presently no jobs 



GRADE 8 

Light Equipment Operator (R) 

Tree Climber (PTT) 

Municipal Buildings Custodian (R) 



GRADE 3 

Clerk Typist (PTT) 

Library Sr. Aide (PTT) 
Cemetery Foreman (PTT) 



GRADE 9 

Wastewater Treatment Plant 

Operator (R) 
Heavy Equipment Operator (R) 
Water Technician (R) 



GRADE 4 

Skilled Laborer (R) 
Secretary (PTT) 



GRADE 10 

Equipment Operator Repairman (R) 
Assistant Wastewater Treatment 
Plant Operator-in-Charge (R) 



GRADE 5 

Co Hector /Bookkeeper /Secretary (R) 



GRADE 11 

Wastewater Treatment Plant 

Operator-in-Charge (R) 
Tree Warden/ Insect Pest Control (PTT) 



GRADE 6 

* — 

Deputy Collector/Bookkeeper (R) 
Police Matron (PTT) 
Skating Supervisor (PTT) 
Traffic Supervisor (PTT) 



GRADE 12 

Street/Water/Sewer Foreman (R) 



286 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS 
Part Time /Temporary 



Animal Inspector 
Waterfront Director 
Asst. Waterfront Director 

Deputy Collector 
Asst. Dog Officer 

Ambulance Serviceman 



$488 per year 

$1,391 to $1,815 per year 

$86 to $119 per week, $749 minimum per 

season 
Fee 
$214 per year and $3.98 per hour when on 

duty 
$2.84 per run, subject to $27 minimum per 

month 



Fire 

Deputy Chief 
Captain 
Lieutenant 
Clerk 

Playground Director 

Police Intern 

Recreation Coordinator 

Registrar 

Registrar, Clerk 

Sealer of Weights/Measures 

Town Counsel 

Veterans' Agent 

Inspectors 

Building Inspector 
Acting Building Inspector 
Gas Inspector 
Acting Gas Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector 
Acting Plumbing Inspector 
Wiring Inspector 
Acting Wiring Inspector 



$739 per year 
$248 per year 
$188 per year 
$188 per year 

$96 to $147 per week 
$106 to $138 per week 
$70 to $86 per week 
$142 per year 
$340 per year 
$239 per year 
$2,813 to $7,032 per year 
$1,590 per year 

$7.03 per inspection except Sanitation's, 

which is $4.25 per inspection 
Annual minimum $1,361 
Annual minimum $181 
Annual minimum $376 
Annual minimum $68 
Annual minimum $1,112 
Annual minimum $255 
Annual minimum $618 
Annual minimum $181 



or do or act anything in relation thereto 



(Personnel Board) 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of conducting 
a management study of town operations or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the town will vote to amend the Classification of Positions 
and Pay Schedules of the Personnel Administration Plan by making the following 
addition: 

FULL TIME POSITIONS 
ASSESSING DEPARTMENT 



Secretary hourly 



2.87 



3.03 



3.20 



3.36 



or do or act anything in relation thereto 



(Board of Assessors) 



3.53 



287 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the town will vote to accept Section 100 I of Chapter 
41 of the General Laws which provides that the town shall indemnify and save 
harmless municipal officers, elected or appointed, from personal financial 
loss and expense including reasonable legal fees and costs, if any, in an 
amount not to exceed one million dollars, arising out of any claim, demand, 
suit or judgment by reason of any act or omission including a violation of 
the civil rights of any person under any federal law, if the official at the 
time of such act or omission was acting within the scope of his official 
duties or employment. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of pur- 
chasing equipment for the Street, Water and Landfill departments as listed, 
and authorize the Selectmen to trade as part of the purchase price equipment 
to be replaced: 



To Be Acquired Department 

1. Pickup Truck, 3/4 ton 

and radio and plow Water 



Trade 



No trade, new 



2. Pickup Truck, 1 ton 
and plow 

3. Street Sweeper 

4. Dozer-Loader 



Street 
Street 
Landfill 



1971 International 
Chassis 

1969 Wayne Sweeper 

1970 Cat 955 



5. Riding Mower 



Street 



No trade, new 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of purchas- 
ing a new 1,000 gallons per minute Class A Pumper for the Fire Department, and 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to trade or sell a 1941 Ford 500 gallons 
per minute Pumper for part of the purchase price, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Fire Department) 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of install- 
ing street sewers in: 

Longmeadow Road 
Spring Valley Road 
Woodfall Road 
Stonybrook Road 
Evergreen Way 
Cross-country from Kaymark Drive to Longmeadow Road 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 



288 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of construct- 
ing Laboratory facilities at the Medfield Senior High School, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(School Committee) 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of prepar- 
ing final design plans and for construction of a facility for the Medfield 
Police Department, said sum to be expended under the direction of the Police 
Station Study Committee, or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Police Station Study Commission) 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the town will request the School Committee to estab- 
lish a hockey program as a part of its regular athletic program and for 
this purpose appropriate a sum of money, said such funds raised by taxation 
or taken from available funds, or take any action relating thereto. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the town will vote to transfer from the Transportation 
Aid Account the sum of Twenty-seven Thousand, Nine Hundred Seventy-six 
Dollars ($27,976) received in accordance with Chapter 825 of the Acts of 1974 
and to borrow the sum of Twenty-seven Thousand, Nine Hundred Seventy-six 
Dollars ($27,976) the town's 1977 allotment from Chapter 765 of the Acts of 
1972, for the purpose of reconstructing North Street from Main Street norther- 
ly for a distance of approximately 1,600 feet (300' northerly of Green Street), 
and to authorize the Selectmen to enter into any and all contracts necessary 
or incidental thereto; said funds may be used in conjunction with any funds 
allotted by the County, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of guard 
fences and posts on Main Street (Route 109) between Bridge Street and the Millis 
town line, said appropriation to be offset by funds received in accordance with 
Chapter 497 of the Acts of 1971 and to authorize the Selectmen to enter into any 
and all contracts necessary or incidental thereto, or do or act anything in re- 
lation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in* what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of resur- 
facing a section of High, South and Spring Streets, said appropriation to be 
offset by funds received in accordance with Chapter 497 of the Acts of 1971 
and to authorize the Selectmen to enter into any and all contracts necessary 
or incidental thereto; said funds may be used with any funds allotted by the 
County; or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 



289 



ARTK see it the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 

.mine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of making 
such repairs or improvements as are necessary to rehabilitate the Hinkley 
Memorial Swim Pond Site and of providing operating funds for a swimming pro- 
gram at the pond for fiscal 1977, said appropriation to be expended under the 
jurisdiction of the Park and Recreation Commission, or take any action relating 
thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised to be used with funds from 
the Federal Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 for the purpose of 
developing and improving recreational facilities at Metacomet Park, or take 
any action relating thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Moderator to ap- 
point a committee of five (5) members and authorize it to make arrangements 
and to spend money appropriated under Article 3 for the observance of Memorial 
Day, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the town will vote to officially name the pond immedi- 
ately adjacent to the First Parish Meeting House as Meeting House Pond or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Historical Commission) 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the town will vote to officially name the following 
water courses: Mill Brook, Vine Brook, Winter Brook, North Brook, Nantasket 
Brook, Great Brook, Stop River; or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Historical Commission) 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of providing 
recreation for the physically and mentally handicapped, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of painting 
and refurbishing the Town clock, or take any action relating thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of installing 
an additional traffic cycle in the traffic signals at the intersection of Routes 
109 and 27, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



290 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of micro- 
filming town records, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of making 
an updated master plan Water Study, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Water & Sewerage Board) 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the 
following-named streets, or parts thereof: 

Kaymark Drive Station 0+0 to Station 9+99.81 

Lakewood Drive Station 6+75.00 to Station 11+50.00 

Morse Lane Station 0+0 to Station 3+67.50 

Ridge Road Station 0+26.84 to Station 2+90.21 

Stonybrook Road Station 11+51.62 to Station 13+58.62 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to in 
the Orders of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, 
titles and easements, including drainage easements as may be necessary to 
accomplish such purposes, or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the town will vote to delete Section 7 of the Medfield 
Zoning Bylaw, "Signs" and substitute in place thereof the following new 
Section 7: 

SECTION 7 

SIGN CODE 

7.1 SIGNING DEFINITIONS 

7.1.1 Sign Any letters, pictorial representations, symbol, flag, 

emblem or animated device displayed in any manner 
whatsoever, which directs attention of persons off the 
premises on which the sign is displayed to any object, 
subject, place, person, activity, product, service, 
institution, organization or business. (For the pur- 
poses of this code, American flags and directional or 
traffic signs and signals erected or adopted by gov- 
ernments or their agencies are not included in this 
definition. ) 



291 



7.1.2 Sign Surface Area - The entire area within a single rectangle (for pur- 

poses of calculation) enclosing the extreme limits of decora- 
tive structure, lettering, representations, emblems or other 
figures, together with any material or color forming an 
integral part of the display or used to differentiate the sign 
from the background against which it is placed. Structural mem- 
bers bearing no sign copy and outside of the above area are not 
included. 

7.1.3 Building Sign Frontage - The length in feet of the ground floor building 

side on which the sign is mounted. For freestanding signs, 
the length of the building side nearest the sign, or, the 
length of the entrance side, whichever is shorter. 

7.1.4 Off-premise Sign - A sign advertising activities, goods, products, ser- 

vices, etc., available elsewhere than within the building or 
on a lot where the sign is located. 

7.1.5 On-premise Sign - A sign advertising activities, goods, etc., available 

within the building or on the lot where the sign is located. 

7.1.5.1 Applied Sign - A painted or applied sign including all lettering and 

symbols together with any background color other than the 
color of the building. 

7.1.5.2 Awning Sign - A sign on or attached to a temporary retractable shelter 

that is supported entirely from the exterior wall of a build- 
ing. 

7.1.5.3 Canopy Sign - A sign on or attached to a permanent overhanging shelter 

that projects from the face of the building and is supported 
entirely or partially by the building. 

7.1.5.4 Freestanding Sign - A sign supported upon the ground and not attached 

to any building. 

7.1.5.5 Parallel Sign - A wall-mounted sign parallel to the building surface 

projecting not more than 12" from that surface. 

7.1.5.6 Projecting Sign - A wall-mounted sign perpendicular to the building 

surface. 

7.1.5.7 Parking Sign - A sign at each vehicular entrance to a parking lot or 

parking garage. 

7.1.5.8 Sign Band - A sign band is a special type of "parallel sign. It is a 

horizontal band, integral to the building facade, and runs the 
full length of the building, exclusive of structural or other 
interruptions . 



292 



7.1.5.9 Window or Interior Sign - A sign painted or applied to glass doors 

or windows, or installed on the interior but visible from the 
exterior. 

7.1.5.10 Special Sign - Any sign or sign structure not included in the pre- 

vious definitions. 

7.2 SIGNING DISTRICTS - The Town of Medfield is divided into three signing 
districts, following zoning classifications. 

7.2.1 Business District - those areas of town zoned Business (B) and 
Business Industrial (BI) . 

7.2.2 Industrial Extensive - the area outside the Central Business District 
zoned IE. 

7.2.3 Residential - All other areas of the town not included above. 

7.3 PROHIBITED SIGNS AND SIGNING LIMITATIONS 

7.3.1 Off-premise signs are prohibited. 

7.3.2 No sign or light shall move, flash, or make noise. (Indicators of 
time and temperature may move.) 

7.3.3 Any imitation of official traffic signs or signals and the use of such 
words as "stop", "look", "danger", "go slow", "caution" or "warning" 
are prohibited. 

7.3.4 Signs before or behind traffic signals shall not obscure or create 
confusion when viewed from a vehicle stopped at a signal. 

7.3.5 Colored lights for sign or building illumination are prohibited in 
residential areas. This requirement does not apply to Christmas signs 
or lights, or to signs installed for a period of less than 14 days. 

7.3.6 A permanent window sign may not exceed one third of the total glass 
area of the windows on the section of the building elevation occupied 
by the business the sign advertises. Any permanent window signs must 
be included in calculating the total area of signage for that eleva- 
tion. 

7.3.7 A freestanding sign may only include lettering to indicate the street 
number, the name and kind of business, service or facility conducted 
on the premises, the year the business was established, the hours of 
operation, time temperature, telephone number and lettering and sym- 
bols that are part of a trade-mark. Freestanding signs for multiple- 
occupancy buildings may display the name and kind of business for each 
occupancy. 

7.3.8 The registered trade-mark of a specific product may occupy no more 
than one quarter of the area of the sign face upon which it appears 
unless the specific product is at least 50% of the business by dollar 
volume. 



293 



ireet parking facilities for ten or more cars may be identified 
by a sign displaying the letter "P" in a size between eight (8) and 

teen US) inches high, and a directional arrow indicating an en- 
trance or exit. No more than one such sign per entrance or exit is 
allowed. Such a sign may also identify the building (or its princi- 
pal occupant) to which the parking is accessory in letters not to ex- 
ceed eight (8) square feet per sign face in area and four feet in 
height. Such signs are not counted in computing total sign area. 

7.4 REQUIRED SIGNS 

7.4.1 The name, if any, and street number of any nonresidential building 
must be identified on or legible from the exterior of the building. 

7.4.2 In a nonresidential area a construction sign is required identifying 
the parties involved and the nature of the construction project, on 
the premises where the sign is located. In a residential area it is 
optional. Sign area may not be greater than 16 square feet. The 
sign must not be installed more than 14 days before construction com- 
mences and must be removed 14 days after any portion of any structure 
is occupied or after any portion of the last structure in a multiple- 
building construction project is occupied. 

7.4.3 The sign permit number issued by the Building Inspector is required 
on every sign except those existing at the time of the adoption of 
this bylaw. Also, sign permits shall not be required for window and 
temporary signs. 

7.5 TEMPORARY SIGNS 

7.5.1 Temporary window signs are allowed only if they advertise special 
sales or events lasting no more than 60 days. They may cover no more 
than one third of the area of the window in which they appear. Their 
area is not included in calculating allowable permanent sign area. 

7.5.2 Real Estate Signs: One unlighted sign of up to 8 square feet pertain- 
ing to the sale, rental or lease of the premises on which the sign is 
placed. Such signs shall be removed by the realtor within 14 days 
after final sale, rental or lease. 

7.6 NUMBER OF SIGNS 

7.6.1 There shall be no more than three different types of permanent signs 
employed per building regardless of the number of occupancies. 

7.6.2 There shall be no more than one freestanding sign per building. 

7.7 LOCATION OF SIGNS 

7.7.1 A parallel sign shall project no more than 12" from the building sur- 
face. No awning, canopy or projecting sign shall project more than 
five feet from the building face or come within three feet of the 
public way reserved for vehicular traffic. 



294 



7.7.2 The bottom of a projecting sign shall be at least ten feet above 
ground level. The bottom of any awning or canopy sign shall not be 
lower than the awning or canopy to which it is attached, and shall 
not be lower than 6 feet and 8 inches above the ground level. 

7.7.3 The surface area of a freestanding sign shall extend no higher than 
15 feet above ground level and the bottom shall not interfere with 
vehicular or pedestrian traffic. 

7.7.4 No parallel sign or any portion thereof shall be allowed above the 
bottom of the sills of second story windows of the building on which 
it is mounted. 

7.7.5 No sign or support for a sign may extend above the cornice line of 
the building to which it is attached. 

7.7.6 In a Business (B) or Business-Industrial (BI) District no freestanding 
sign shall be located nearer to the street line than the permitted 
setback distance for a building on the same lot. 

7.8 SIGN SURFACE AREA 

7.8.1 Except as noted below, the area of a sign is defined as the entire 
area within a single rectangle enclosing the extreme limits of letter- 
ing, decorative structure, logos, representations, emblems or other 
figures, together with any material or color forming an integral part 
of the sign or used to differentiate the sign from the building on 
which it is mounted. Structural members bearing no sign copy and out- 
side of the area defined above are not included in calculating sign 
area. 

7.8.1.1 For two- or three-sided freestanding or projecting signs, all vertical 
sides are included in calculating sign area, whether used for copy or 
not. 

7.8.1.2 For freestanding or projecting signs having more than three sides 
(e.g., a cube sign), the sign area is calculated as the sum of one 
less than the number of vertical sides. 

7.8.1.3 For parallel signs composed of individual letters mounted directly to 
a building, with no differentiating background color or material, the 
sign area shall be calculated as the sum of the areas of rectangles 
enclosing the individual letters. 

7.8.2 In a Residential District there shall be no signs except the following: 
On a lot occupied by a dwelling there shall not be more than one sign 
pertaining to the use thereof or bearing the name and occupation of 
any occupant, or occupants, and no such sign shall exceed one square 
foot in area; for premises used for home occupations, there shall be 
no exterior signs other than a sign not to exceed one square foot in 
area, and carrying only the name and occupation of any occupant of 

the premises such as a physician, artisan, beautician, lawyer, archi- 
tect, engineer, clergyman, accountant, osteopath, dentist and similar 
occupations or professions or as allowed in Section 5.2. 

7.8.3 Business District: Maximum sign area allowed is calculated according 
to a formula based on the building sign frontage or as otherwise in- 
dicated. 

295 



. imum sign area equals ten times the square root of the building 
bign frontage. 

1.2 For buildings with building sign frontage more than 25 feet: 

Maximum sign area equals fifteen times the square root of the building 
sign frontage. 

7.8.4 Industrial-Extensive District: 

7.8.4.1 Maximum sign area equals five times the square root of the building 
sign frontage. 

7.8.5 In the case where no building sign frontage exists, the maximum sign 
area allowed is 32 square feet, advertising only those activities 
conducted on the premises. 

7.8.6 Sign Area Exceptions: Allowed in addition to the maximum sign area 
are the following: 

7.8.6.1 Historic markers and commemorative tablets up to 5 square feet in area 
when made a permanent and integral part of the building. 

7.8.6.2 Signs up to 2 square feet in area, including signs identifying non- 
profit organizations, rest rooms, telephones, and other public facili- 
ties are allowed for the purposes of identification. 

7.9 ADMINISTRATION (See Section 13.2 also.) 

7.9.1 No sign, except noncommercial signs less than one square foot or spe- 
cifically enumerated in Section 7.5 Temporary Signs, shall be erected 
without a permit issued by the Building Inspector, application for 
which shall be accompanied by such scale drawings, photographs, and 
other information as the Building Inspector may require. The appli- 
cant must be the owner of the property or have the written permission 
of the owner. 

7.9.2 Fees for sign permits shall be fixed every three years by the Board 
of Selectmen. 

7.9.3 Fines for violations of the Sign Bylaw shall be established by the 
Board of Selectmen. 

7.9.4 A Sign Advisory Board Shall be established for the following purposes: 

a) To review periodically the existing Sign Bylaw and advise the 
Planning Board as to desirable modifications. 

b) To provide assistance and advice. 

c) To bring violations of the Sign Bylaw to the attention of the 
Zoning Enforcing Officer. 

The Sign Advisory Board members shall be appointed by the Planning 
Board and shall be composed of the following: one Planning Board 
member; one Master Plan Implementation Committee member; one member 

296 



of Industrial Commission, three businessmen (two to be Medfield 
residaats, one to be nonresident), one member of Building Code 
Committee. 

7.10 OBSOLETE SIGNS 

7.10.1 A sign which ceases to advertise a bonafide business conducted or 
product sold on any premises shall be removed within 30 days after 
written notification from the Building Inspector. 



7.11 ALTERATION, REPAIR, AND REPLACEMENT OF ON-PREMISE SIGNS 

7.11.1 Except for copy changes on signs with changeable letter channels, no 
signs shall be reconstructed, extended, changed structurally or in 
content or repaired except in accordance with this ordinance. A 
sign which does not conform with this ordinance may be repaired pro- 
vided that the cost of repair does not exceed 50% of the replacement 
cost of the entire sign, except that an electric time and temperature 
sign which is an integral part of a nonconforming sign may be repaired 
or replaced with no restrictions on the cost of the repair or re- 
placement. A nonconforming sign which is deemed unsafe by the 
Building Inspector shall be removed by its owner. 

or do or take any action relative thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to 
the Conservation Fund and determine in what manner the money will be raised, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen and 
Conservation Commission) 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
and/or Conservation Commission to acquire by easement, purchase, gift or 
eminent domain the fee or any lesser interest including such lease hold or life 
tenancy interest as the Selectmen shall determine in the developed and undevel- 
oped land on Noon Hill bounded in general by the Stop River, Causeway Street, 
Orchard Street and Indian Hill Road and vote to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to utilize the funds appropriated under Article 10 of the 19 74 annual town 
meeting as amended by Article 1 of the November 3, 1975, special town meeting 
for these purposes, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the town will vote to delete and exclude the property 
of Patrick S. Harris, Lot 16 on Map 14, from the land authorized for acquisi- 
tion by easement, gift, purchase or eminent demain, authorized by Article 10 of 
the 1974 Town Meeting. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Board of Assessors 
to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the 
Tax Rate, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

297 



(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the town will vote to accept the following-named sums 
as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the 
interest thereof or as may be necessary for said care, viz: 



Adelbert Kilmer Lot 
Lawrence Alger Lot 
Charles Alger Lot 
John Alger Lot 
Greta Mann Lot 
Robert Alger Lot 
Olga Harrington Lot 
Barbara Alger Lot 
Joseph Zanstuck Lot 
Alexander Johnson Lot 
Forrest Parker Lot 
Walter Sabbag Lot 
Charles Austin Lot 
Garfield Farrell Lot 
Joseph Lanseigne Lot 
Irma Pickard Lot 
Bruce Rieth Lot 
Robert J. Davidson Lot 
Rae J. Conway Lot 
Walter Marks Lot 
William Doub Lot 



$100.00 
200.00 
200.00 
100.00 
100.00 
200.00 
200.00 
100.00 
200.00 
100.00 
100.00 
400.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
100.00 
200.00 
300.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
$3800.00 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven 
days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings 
thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this second day of March, A.D. , Nineteen Hundred 
and Seventy-six. 

Hcvoiy A. KdULz.hQA 
R. EduJOAd ZdoJid 
kdUauJi L. faAAaA 

Selectmen of Medfield 



298 



NOTES 



299 



INDEX 

Page 

Town Officers Elected 5 

Appointments by Board of Health 15 

Appointments by Collector 17 

Appointments by Fire Chief 17 

Appointments by Park & Recreation 15 

Appointments by Planning Board 15 

Appointments by Selectmen 7 

Appointments by Town Clerk 17 

Appointments by Town Moderator 16 

Appointments by Treasurer 17 

DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Aging , Council on 75 

Ambulance 47 

Anniversary Committee 88 

Appeals on Zoning , Board of 5 3 

Building Code Committee 76 

Civil Defense 49 

Conservation Commission 65 

Development & Industrial Commission 83 

Dog Officer 81 

Fire Department 38 

Health , Board of 66 

Historical Commission 85 

Housing Authority 62 

Inspector of Animals 79 

Inspector of Buildings 77 

Inspector of Gasfittings 80 

Inspector of Plumbing 80 

Inspector of Wiring 79 

Jury List 95 

Library Trustees 59 

Master Plan Implementation Committee 52 

Memorial Library 60 

Mental Health & Retardation Area Board 94 

Mosquito Control, Norfolk County 70 

Park & Recreation Commission 73 

Planning Board 54 

Police Department 40 

Police Station Study Committee 43 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 82 

Selectmen, Board of 21 

Streets, Water & Sewer, Superintendent of 34 

Town Clock, Keeper of 50 

Tree Warden 71 

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School 93 

Veterans ' Services 74 

Water & Sewerage Department 51 



300 



INDEX 

Page 
SCHOOL DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Adult Education 137 

Amos Clark Kingsbury School 127 

Athletic Director 138 

Buildings and Grounds Director 141 

Dale Street School 121 

Ralph Wheelock School 124 

Enrollment Commentary 113 

Junior High School 126 

Graduation Exercises , High School 129 

Instructional Materials Centers 135 

Memorial Elementary School 120 

School Committee 98 

School Lunch Program 140 

Special Services , Director of 133 

Superintendent of Schools 99 

Teachers ' Directory 101 

TOWN CLERK'S RECORD: 

Births 145 

Marriages 148 

Deaths 151 

TOWN MEETINGS AND ELECTIONS: 

Annual Town Election, March 31, 1975 153 

Warrant and Proceedings, Annual Town Meeting, April 28, 1975 158 

Warrant and Proceedings, Special Town Meeting, April 28, 1975 ....... 191 

Warrant and Proceedings, Special Town Meeting, November 3, 1975 ..... 252 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting 1976 2 77 



FINANCIAL REPORTS: 

Assessors ' Report 260 

73 



Contracts for Professional Services 2' 



Perpetual Care 

Tax Collector .........................I...]..." 262 

Town Accountant ncr> 

rp ZO J 

Treasurer ,, 

274 



301 



NOTES 



302 



NOTES 



303 



304